Router same brand as network card: Do I care?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by douglasl, Aug 12, 2008.

  1. douglasl

    douglasl Guest

    How important is it - if it is important at all - to pick a wireless router
    that's the same BRAND as the wireless network cards that I'm using in the
    client computers?

    Are there brands of routers that are known to be particularly troublesome
    when mixed with networking hardware from other vendors?

    Thanks for any suggestions, or pointers to other online resources!

    -Doug
     
    douglasl, Aug 12, 2008
    #1
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  2. douglasl

    Big_Al Guest

    douglasl wrote:
    > How important is it - if it is important at all - to pick a wireless router
    > that's the same BRAND as the wireless network cards that I'm using in the
    > client computers?
    >
    > Are there brands of routers that are known to be particularly troublesome
    > when mixed with networking hardware from other vendors?
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions, or pointers to other online resources!
    >
    > -Doug
    >

    It's not supposed to but if you are running 'N', I've heard it can be an
    issue. But I've got a built in intel wireless G card in my laptop so
    there are no routers to match me, and I've traveled and had no problem
    in hotels & airports. So in practice, I'd say that it makes little
    difference. But when I bought my PCMCIA card and router, I did buy
    Netgear for both, just in case.
     
    Big_Al, Aug 12, 2008
    #2
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  3. douglasl

    Lem Guest

    douglasl wrote:
    > How important is it - if it is important at all - to pick a wireless router
    > that's the same BRAND as the wireless network cards that I'm using in the
    > client computers?
    >
    > Are there brands of routers that are known to be particularly troublesome
    > when mixed with networking hardware from other vendors?
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions, or pointers to other online resources!
    >
    > -Doug
    >


    If you have an adapter or a router that is advertised as giving better
    performance than the spec (e.g., 108 Mbps for 802.11G), then -- in
    general -- you will only get any enhancement if the brands *and* model
    lines of the router and adapter are the same. For example, if you have
    a standard wireless-G router and a "108 Mbps" adapter, you'll only get
    standard wireless-G performance.

    Even though 802.11n has *still* not been ratified by the IEEE, the WiFi
    Alliance (the manufacturers' group) has a program to "certify"
    interoperability of 802.11n products of different brands. In fact, the
    WiFi certification is also supposed to "ensure that products from
    different vendors work together" for all wireless specs. See:
    http://certifications.wi-fi.org/wbcs_certified_products.php?lang=en



    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
     
    Lem, Aug 12, 2008
    #3
  4. douglasl

    John Guest

    "J.H. Holliday" <doc@ok> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Main advantage is if they're different brands, you have a problem and call
    > tech support, the router manufacturer will tell you it's wireless card
    > issue--- and vice versa....


    Wait a minute... calling clueless tech support who's good at nothing but
    pointing fingers is an advantage?
     
    John, Aug 12, 2008
    #4
  5. douglasl

    Kwmani Guest

    With .n standard using a Belkin router, Trendnet adapter on one machine and
    Dell adapter on the other without any problems.

    "douglasl" wrote:

    > How important is it - if it is important at all - to pick a wireless router
    > that's the same BRAND as the wireless network cards that I'm using in the
    > client computers?
    >
    > Are there brands of routers that are known to be particularly troublesome
    > when mixed with networking hardware from other vendors?
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions, or pointers to other online resources!
    >
    > -Doug
    >
     
    Kwmani, Aug 12, 2008
    #5
  6. Hi
    While differences of performance between Laptop's Wireless card are almost
    none existence, there is significant differences between the performance of
    Wireless Routers.
    Ergo I would nor choose a Router just because I happened to have card X in
    my laptop,
    Tell us what is the model and the make of the card and may be some one would
    come wit6h a solid recommendation.
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)

    "douglasl" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > How important is it - if it is important at all - to pick a wireless
    > router
    > that's the same BRAND as the wireless network cards that I'm using in the
    > client computers?
    >
    > Are there brands of routers that are known to be particularly troublesome
    > when mixed with networking hardware from other vendors?
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions, or pointers to other online resources!
    >
    > -Doug
    >
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Aug 12, 2008
    #6
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