router question

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by bhb, Sep 8, 2004.

  1. bhb

    bhb Guest

    I want to hook up 2 computers to use the same cable internet service.One
    uses 98 & the other XP. I was told that I need to use a router.What is the
    best type to get ;wired or wireless? The 2 computers will be about 20' away
    from each other & 2 walls between them. Also I have 2 cordless
    2.4mhz.phones; will these interfere with the wireless ones? Thanks for any
    help.
     
    bhb, Sep 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. bhb

    why? Guest

    On Wed, 08 Sep 2004 19:24:35 GMT, bhb wrote:

    >I want to hook up 2 computers to use the same cable internet service.One
    >uses 98 & the other XP. I was told that I need to use a router.What is the


    A router is easiest.

    >best type to get ;wired or wireless? The 2 computers will be about 20' away


    Best type? What do you use / need? Do you plan to get wireless?

    >from each other & 2 walls between them. Also I have 2 cordless


    If you can't cable between the rooms, then it sounds like you need the
    wireless option.

    >2.4mhz.phones; will these interfere with the wireless ones? Thanks for any

    It's Mhz.
    >help.


    The wireless stuff is 2.4GHz well away from the phone figure you quoted.
    If in doubt the wireless has selectable channel and you can always check
    the manufacturer help/support/FAQs before purchase.

    I have used the Belkin 54g stuff, Wireless Router and also an additional
    Access Point using both PCCard (Laptop) and PCI cards.

    Me
     
    why?, Sep 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. bhb

    bhb Guest

    I'm sorry ,my phones are 2.4Ghz not Mhz. Will they affect the operation of
    the router?
    "why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On Wed, 08 Sep 2004 19:24:35 GMT, bhb wrote:
    >
    > >I want to hook up 2 computers to use the same cable internet service.One
    > >uses 98 & the other XP. I was told that I need to use a router.What is

    the
    >
    > A router is easiest.
    >
    > >best type to get ;wired or wireless? The 2 computers will be about 20'

    away
    >
    > Best type? What do you use / need? Do you plan to get wireless?
    >
    > >from each other & 2 walls between them. Also I have 2 cordless

    >
    > If you can't cable between the rooms, then it sounds like you need the
    > wireless option.
    >
    > >2.4mhz.phones; will these interfere with the wireless ones? Thanks for

    any
    > It's Mhz.
    > >help.

    >
    > The wireless stuff is 2.4GHz well away from the phone figure you quoted.
    > If in doubt the wireless has selectable channel and you can always check
    > the manufacturer help/support/FAQs before purchase.
    >
    > I have used the Belkin 54g stuff, Wireless Router and also an additional
    > Access Point using both PCCard (Laptop) and PCI cards.
    >
    > Me
     
    bhb, Sep 8, 2004
    #3
  4. bhb

    why? Guest

    On Wed, 08 Sep 2004 21:06:33 GMT, bhb wrote:

    >I'm sorry ,my phones are 2.4Ghz not Mhz. Will they affect the operation of


    My typo - MHz and GHz.

    >the router?


    In that case maybe, as mentioned earlier,

    >> If in doubt the wireless has selectable channel and you can always check
    >> the manufacturer help/support/FAQs before purchase.


    Or the always helpful Google
    http://www.google.com/search?q=wireless router 2.4GHz phone
    Results 1 - 10 of about 65,600 English pages for wireless router 2.4GHz
    phone. (0.59 seconds)


    D-Link Wireless PC-CardBus Adapter
    D-Link Wireless Router/Firewall. ... in infrastructure mode to connect
    with a wireless
    access point ... Users Worried about interference between your 2.4GHz
    phone and a ...
    www.smarthome.com/6300.html - 36k - 8 Sep 2004 - Cached - Similar pages

    D-Link AirPlus Extreme G™ 2.4GHz Wireless Networking Products
    ... Worried about interference between your 2.4GHz phone and a ...
    Also, in the 802.11b
    (2.4GHz) standard there are ... 6300G D-LINK WIRELESS ROUTER 54MBPS
    2.4GHZ $149.99 ...
    www.smarthome.com/6300G.html - 47k - Cached - Similar pages
    [ More results from www.smarthome.com ]

    Amazon.com: Electronics: D-Link DI-714P+ 2.4GHZ Wireless Router
    .... maybe it's Microsoft...maybe it's your 2.4GHZ phone running on ... I
    may keep the router
    if it stays stable for a ... I will need to buy another wireless print
    server ...
    www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ tg/detail/-/B00006SKKD?v=glance - 69k -
    Cached - Similar pages

    Amazon.com: Electronics: Netgear WGR614 802.11g Wireless Router
    ... doesn't seem to interfere with my 2.4 ghz Panasonic cordless ...
    I currently have the
    router at the end of my ... ip address for each computer on the
    wireless LAN by ...
    www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ tg/detail/-/B00008SCFL?v=glance - 74k -
    7 Sep 2004 - Cached - Similar pages
    [ More results from www.amazon.com ]

    That Computer Guy's Help Forum -> router and 2.4ghz phone ...
    .... router and 2.4ghz phone interrupting wireless. ...
    http://forums.thatcomputerguy.us/index.php?showtopic=4818 - 30k - Cached
    - Similar pages



    >"why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>
    >> On Wed, 08 Sep 2004 19:24:35 GMT, bhb wrote:
    >>
    >> >I want to hook up 2 computers to use the same cable internet service.One
    >> >uses 98 & the other XP. I was told that I need to use a router.What is

    >the
    >>
    >> A router is easiest.
    >>
    >> >best type to get ;wired or wireless? The 2 computers will be about 20'

    >away
    >>
    >> Best type? What do you use / need? Do you plan to get wireless?
    >>
    >> >from each other & 2 walls between them. Also I have 2 cordless

    >>
    >> If you can't cable between the rooms, then it sounds like you need the
    >> wireless option.

    <snip>

    Me
     
    why?, Sep 9, 2004
    #4
  5. bhb wrote:

    > I want to hook up 2 computers to use the same cable internet
    > service.One uses 98 & the other XP. I was told that I need to use a
    > router.What is the best type to get ;wired or wireless? The 2
    > computers will be about 20' away from each other & 2 walls between
    > them. Also I have 2 cordless 2.4mhz.phones; will these interfere with
    > the wireless ones? Thanks for any help.


    Hardwired Cat5 connection:
    PRO: Best speeds (10 or 100MB dependant on Router & NICs)
    CON: Cables needed (Need to stretch from router to computers)

    Your only wireless choice will be:
    802.11a - Uses the 5-GHz band
    54 Mbps speed (Top possible, typical throughput of 24 Mbps)

    Stay away from Bluetooth, 802.11b & 802.11g wireless systems:
    All use the 2.4 Ghz Radio spectrum - will be susceptable to interference

    Honestly, if you CAN go with Hardwired connection, do it. (Double-stick
    tape can be used to help support wires in hard-to-spot locations.) If
    you can't, be sure to enable WEP (Wireless Encryption Protocal) to lock
    out nearby "rogue" accesses.

    Since Wireless Networking is becoming more and more popular, you may run
    into problems with other nearby wireless bases or other 5 Ghz devices.
    Be sure you have a valid return policy for whatever hardware you
    purchase just in case.

    --

    BuffNET Technical Support Supervisor
    (BEHOLD! The power of the BOFH!)
     
    BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ, Sep 10, 2004
    #5
  6. bhb

    Jim Berwick Guest

    BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ <> wrote in
    news::

    > Your only wireless choice will be:
    > 802.11a - Uses the 5-GHz band
    > 54 Mbps speed (Top possible, typical throughput of 24 Mbps)
    >
    > Stay away from Bluetooth, 802.11b & 802.11g wireless systems:
    > All use the 2.4 Ghz Radio spectrum - will be susceptable to interference


    Complete malarky. 802.11b/g are both highly viable wireless technologies,
    and using WEP alone is foolish. You should use WEP + MAC Filtering, and
    occasionally change the WEP key.
     
    Jim Berwick, Sep 10, 2004
    #6
  7. bhb

    why? Guest

    On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 16:46:57 -0400, BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ
    wrote:

    >bhb wrote:
    >
    >> I want to hook up 2 computers to use the same cable internet
    >> service.One uses 98 & the other XP. I was told that I need to use a
    >> router.What is the best type to get ;wired or wireless? The 2
    >> computers will be about 20' away from each other & 2 walls between
    >> them. Also I have 2 cordless 2.4mhz.phones; will these interfere with
    >> the wireless ones? Thanks for any help.

    >
    >Hardwired Cat5 connection:
    >PRO: Best speeds (10 or 100MB dependant on Router & NICs)


    Or 1000Mbps.

    >CON: Cables needed (Need to stretch from router to computers)


    Don't stretch cables.

    >Your only wireless choice will be:
    >802.11a - Uses the 5-GHz band
    >54 Mbps speed (Top possible, typical throughput of 24 Mbps)


    Which doesn't interoperate with commonly available b and g devices.
    Requires use of TriMode Dualband equipment.

    >
    >Stay away from Bluetooth, 802.11b & 802.11g wireless systems:
    >All use the 2.4 Ghz Radio spectrum - will be susceptable to interference
    >
    >Honestly, if you CAN go with Hardwired connection, do it. (Double-stick
    >tape can be used to help support wires in hard-to-spot locations.) If
    >you can't, be sure to enable WEP (Wireless Encryption Protocal) to lock
    >out nearby "rogue" accesses.


    Should have mentioed WPA and not broadcasting SSID and using MAC access
    control.

    <snip>

    Me
     
    why?, Sep 11, 2004
    #7
  8. bhb

    Scrote Guest

    why? wrote:
    >> On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 16:46:57 -0400, BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> bhb wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I want to hook up 2 computers to use the same cable internet
    >>>> service.One uses 98 & the other XP. I was told that I need to use a
    >>>> router.What is the best type to get ;wired or wireless? The 2
    >>>> computers will be about 20' away from each other & 2 walls between
    >>>> them. Also I have 2 cordless 2.4mhz.phones; will these interfere
    >>>> with the wireless ones? Thanks for any help.
    >>>
    >>> Hardwired Cat5 connection:
    >>> PRO: Best speeds (10 or 100MB dependant on Router & NICs)

    >>
    >> Or 1000Mbps.
    >>
    >>> CON: Cables needed (Need to stretch from router to computers)

    >>
    >> Don't stretch cables.
    >>
    >>> Your only wireless choice will be:
    >>> 802.11a - Uses the 5-GHz band
    >>> 54 Mbps speed (Top possible, typical throughput of 24 Mbps)

    >>
    >> Which doesn't interoperate with commonly available b and g devices.
    >> Requires use of TriMode Dualband equipment.
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Stay away from Bluetooth, 802.11b & 802.11g wireless systems:
    >>> All use the 2.4 Ghz Radio spectrum - will be susceptable to
    >>> interference
    >>>
    >>> Honestly, if you CAN go with Hardwired connection, do it.
    >>> (Double-stick tape can be used to help support wires in
    >>> hard-to-spot locations.) If you can't, be sure to enable WEP
    >>> (Wireless Encryption Protocal) to lock out nearby "rogue" accesses.

    >>
    >> Should have mentioed WPA and not broadcasting SSID and using MAC
    >> access control.
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >> Me


    I have seen much recent( and some not so) debate reference SSID
    broadcast. The received wisdom seems to be that turning it off achieves
    little. A hacker will probably have the tools(program) to cause
    temporary disassociation of the wireless link. This is, to all intents &
    purposes, instantaneous. On reinstatment of the link the router/ap will
    broadcast its SSID briefly which will in turn be recorded by the hacker.
    It is MUCH more important to have the highest level of encryption
    available in use and use MAC address filtering.

    --
    Twas a woman who drove me to drink.
    I never had the courtesy to thank her.
    W.C.Fields
     
    Scrote, Sep 11, 2004
    #8
  9. bhb

    why? Guest

    On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 16:00:34 +0100, Scrote wrote:

    >why? wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 16:46:57 -0400, BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> bhb wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I want to hook up 2 computers to use the same cable internet
    >>>>> service.One uses 98 & the other XP. I was told that I need to use a
    >>>>> router.What is the best type to get ;wired or wireless? The 2
    >>>>> computers will be about 20' away from each other & 2 walls between
    >>>>> them. Also I have 2 cordless 2.4mhz.phones; will these interfere
    >>>>> with the wireless ones? Thanks for any help.
    >>>>
    >>>> Hardwired Cat5 connection:
    >>>> PRO: Best speeds (10 or 100MB dependant on Router & NICs)
    >>>
    >>> Or 1000Mbps.
    >>>
    >>>> CON: Cables needed (Need to stretch from router to computers)
    >>>
    >>> Don't stretch cables.
    >>>
    >>>> Your only wireless choice will be:
    >>>> 802.11a - Uses the 5-GHz band
    >>>> 54 Mbps speed (Top possible, typical throughput of 24 Mbps)
    >>>
    >>> Which doesn't interoperate with commonly available b and g devices.
    >>> Requires use of TriMode Dualband equipment.
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Stay away from Bluetooth, 802.11b & 802.11g wireless systems:
    >>>> All use the 2.4 Ghz Radio spectrum - will be susceptable to
    >>>> interference
    >>>>
    >>>> Honestly, if you CAN go with Hardwired connection, do it.
    >>>> (Double-stick tape can be used to help support wires in
    >>>> hard-to-spot locations.) If you can't, be sure to enable WEP
    >>>> (Wireless Encryption Protocal) to lock out nearby "rogue" accesses.
    >>>
    >>> Should have mentioed WPA and not broadcasting SSID and using MAC
    >>> access control.
    >>>
    >>> <snip>
    >>>
    >>> Me

    >
    >I have seen much recent( and some not so) debate reference SSID
    >broadcast. The received wisdom seems to be that turning it off achieves
    >little. A hacker will probably have the tools(program) to cause
    >temporary disassociation of the wireless link. This is, to all intents &


    Agree, it's to help anyone trying to hack in a little as possible.

    It also brings in the commercial / office situation vis home discussion,
    and level of security , MAC blocking, firewall, VPN and proxy
    restrictions.

    >purposes, instantaneous. On reinstatment of the link the router/ap will
    >broadcast its SSID briefly which will in turn be recorded by the hacker.
    >It is MUCH more important to have the highest level of encryption
    >available in use and use MAC address filtering.


    It's the same with all the ocassional Norton 2003 questions, it's not
    just the DAT files that need updating it's the scanning engine in later
    versions that provide better protection. Taking more preventative steps
    is better.

    Me
     
    why?, Sep 11, 2004
    #9
  10. bhb

    Mikish Guest

    why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> impressed us all with the following
    remark:

    >
    > On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 16:46:57 -0400, BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ
    > wrote:
    >
    > >bhb wrote:
    > >
    > >> I want to hook up 2 computers to use the same cable internet
    > >> service.One uses 98 & the other XP. I was told that I need to use a
    > >> router.What is the best type to get ;wired or wireless? The 2
    > >> computers will be about 20' away from each other & 2 walls between
    > >> them. Also I have 2 cordless 2.4mhz.phones; will these interfere with
    > >> the wireless ones? Thanks for any help.

    > >
    > >Hardwired Cat5 connection:
    > >PRO: Best speeds (10 or 100MB dependant on Router & NICs)

    >
    > Or 1000Mbps.


    It seems that 1000Mbps Internet routers are a little hard to come by and
    expensive, but a local network based on that speed is extremely nice. I opted
    to just add an additional inexpensive 1000Mbps switch to handle the portions
    of my network that were equipped to handle the higher speeds (along with CAT 6
    cabling). Possibly overkill for a home system, but very nice if you use your
    network heavily as I do.

    > >CON: Cables needed (Need to stretch from router to computers)

    >
    > Don't stretch cables.


    Too funny!

    > >Your only wireless choice will be:
    > >802.11a - Uses the 5-GHz band
    > >54 Mbps speed (Top possible, typical throughput of 24 Mbps)

    >
    > Which doesn't interoperate with commonly available b and g devices.
    > Requires use of TriMode Dualband equipment.


    Yes, 802.11g seems to be the starting point nowadays with "b" and "a" being
    somewhat obsolete. Everyone has their favorite hardware brands and mine is
    Netgear. I added their 108Mbps wireless and have been totally pleased,
    especially with the range, which was a problem with my older 802.11b based
    wireless router.

    > <snip>


    --
    ....Hi Mara!
     
    Mikish, Sep 11, 2004
    #10
  11. bhb

    why? Guest

    On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 11:29:59 -0700, Mikish wrote:

    >why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> impressed us all with the following
    >remark:
    >
    >>
    >> On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 16:46:57 -0400, BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >bhb wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> I want to hook up 2 computers to use the same cable internet
    >> >> service.One uses 98 & the other XP. I was told that I need to use a
    >> >> router.What is the best type to get ;wired or wireless? The 2
    >> >> computers will be about 20' away from each other & 2 walls between
    >> >> them. Also I have 2 cordless 2.4mhz.phones; will these interfere with
    >> >> the wireless ones? Thanks for any help.
    >> >
    >> >Hardwired Cat5 connection:
    >> >PRO: Best speeds (10 or 100MB dependant on Router & NICs)

    >>
    >> Or 1000Mbps.

    >
    >It seems that 1000Mbps Internet routers are a little hard to come by and


    Haven't seen 1 yet, however as the ISP is only 3Mbps/256K it's not an
    issue.

    >expensive, but a local network based on that speed is extremely nice. I opted
    >to just add an additional inexpensive 1000Mbps switch to handle the portions


    Same here, I have ended up with multiple switches/repeaters and have
    10/100 and 1000 Mbps segments.

    >of my network that were equipped to handle the higher speeds (along with CAT 6
    >cabling). Possibly overkill for a home system, but very nice if you use your


    I didn't bother with that for the short distances Cat5/5e work just
    fine.

    >network heavily as I do.


    I found it makes it easier to burn DVD backups a x4 with the 1000Mbps,
    sometimes on the 100 the odd coaster was left.

    >> >CON: Cables needed (Need to stretch from router to computers)

    >>
    >> Don't stretch cables.

    >
    >Too funny!
    >
    >> >Your only wireless choice will be:
    >> >802.11a - Uses the 5-GHz band
    >> >54 Mbps speed (Top possible, typical throughput of 24 Mbps)

    >>
    >> Which doesn't interoperate with commonly available b and g devices.
    >> Requires use of TriMode Dualband equipment.

    >
    >Yes, 802.11g seems to be the starting point nowadays with "b" and "a" being
    >somewhat obsolete. Everyone has their favorite hardware brands and mine is
    >Netgear. I added their 108Mbps wireless and have been totally pleased,


    I finished off my Belkin wireless setup with the 54 stuff weeks ago,
    last week I saw boxes of 108 for the first time <sigh>

    <snip>

    Me
     
    why?, Sep 11, 2004
    #11
  12. bhb

    Mikish Guest

    why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> impressed us all with the following
    remark:

    [...]

    > >It seems that 1000Mbps Internet routers are a little hard to come by and

    >
    > Haven't seen 1 yet, however as the ISP is only 3Mbps/256K it's not an
    > issue.


    It would be a consideration for one stop shopping where the Internet router is
    also to be used as the LAN switch (as is common). It would be convenient and
    save on additional hardware. I looked recently, but only briefly without any
    luck. As soon as I would have said that they don't exist, someone would have
    immediately come forward with a link though!

    > >expensive, but a local network based on that speed is extremely nice. I opted
    > >to just add an additional inexpensive 1000Mbps switch to handle the portions

    >
    > Same here, I have ended up with multiple switches/repeaters and have
    > 10/100 and 1000 Mbps segments.


    Yeah, me too. Both my goddess and I mainly work from home and rely heavily on
    a variety of workstations and servers... not your typical home setup. I've
    gotten totally spoiled by the 1000 Mbps portion of the network while my
    significant other is generally moving around using one of the wireless access
    points and a laptop.

    > >of my network that were equipped to handle the higher speeds (along with CAT 6
    > >cabling). Possibly overkill for a home system, but very nice if you use your

    >
    > I didn't bother with that for the short distances Cat5/5e work just
    > fine.


    7' CAT 6 patch cables were only a couple of bucks, so I opted to pick some up
    when I purchased the high speed switch. I have to eventually make a longer
    run though, and have been putting off picking up a spool because I haven't
    seen a reasonable price yet locally.

    > I found it makes it easier to burn DVD backups a x4 with the 1000Mbps,
    > sometimes on the 100 the odd coaster was left.


    I'm sure that's true, but I hadn't had any problems burning across the old 100
    Mbps network. I was having an aggravating problem making coasters, but that
    went away when I threw the burner in the trash... (another trip to Fry's)!

    [...]

    > >Yes, 802.11g seems to be the starting point nowadays with "b" and "a" being
    > >somewhat obsolete. Everyone has their favorite hardware brands and mine is
    > >Netgear. I added their 108Mbps wireless and have been totally pleased,

    >
    > I finished off my Belkin wireless setup with the 54 stuff weeks ago,
    > last week I saw boxes of 108 for the first time <sigh>


    It was more important to me when I was using my laptop all the time, but I've
    switched back to a workstation directly connected to the network. I would
    always get a solid 54 with bursts up to 108. It's not like a *constant* 108,
    but there is a slight difference between straight 54 Mbps. I wouldn't beat
    yourself up too bad!

    A friend just picked up a Belkin setup a few days ago. I've heard that they
    can be pretty solid, but have not heard anything about his experiences yet.
     
    Mikish, Sep 11, 2004
    #12
  13. why? wrote:

    >>Hardwired Cat5 connection:
    >>PRO: Best speeds (10 or 100MB dependant on Router & NICs)


    > Or 1000Mbps.


    True - but not nearly as typical at the consumer level, from what I've seen.

    >>CON: Cables needed (Need to stretch from router to computers)


    > Don't stretch cables.


    (Chuckle) Point taken... Mea Culpa - do NOT stretch cable.. they must
    reach from point to point with some room to spare.

    >>Your only wireless choice will be:
    >>802.11a - Uses the 5-GHz band
    >>54 Mbps speed (Top possible, typical throughput of 24 Mbps)


    > Which doesn't interoperate with commonly available b and g devices.
    > Requires use of TriMode Dualband equipment.


    Yes.. But as b and g use the frequency space he's trying to avoid, that
    leaves us with a by process of elimination. (And aren't tri-band access
    points damned expensive and harder to find than dragon's teeth?)

    >>....be sure to enable WEP (Wireless Encryption Protocal) to lock
    >>out nearby "rogue" accesses.


    > Should have mentioed WPA and not broadcasting SSID and using MAC access
    > control.


    True.... again, my oversight on that one.

    If the OP is still reading, be sure if you do go wireless to use all the
    security settings at your disposal. (And don't neglect using a desktop
    firewall either!)

    --

    BuffNET Technical Support Supervisor
    (BEHOLD! The power of the BOFH!)
     
    BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ, Sep 13, 2004
    #13
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