Router / network problem

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by jhewitt@arrakis.es, Nov 30, 2006.

  1. Guest

    One of my networked computers can't connect to the 'net.

    I have two PCs, a Pentium 2300 and a Celeron 400, connected to a four
    port ADSL router [ Dlink 504T ].
    The router does not run DHCP, the three units are given DNSs...
    Router 192.168.1.1 Pentium 192.168.1.2 Celeron 192.168.1.3

    Using the Pentium, I can connect to the 'net, and ping all three
    addresses. It's OK.

    Using the router I can ping the Pentium and the router itself, but NOT
    the Celeron.

    Using the Celeron I can ping all three addresses, but Opera [ and
    Firefox ] cannot find any URL I enter and connect to the 'net.

    I have tried resetting many of the values in both the Celeron and the
    router, but can't get the Celeron to connect to the 'net.

    Sure would appreciate a hint / help/ guide with this problem.

    Thanks.
    John Hewitt, Malaga, Spain

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    , Nov 30, 2006
    #1
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  2. Mr. Arnold6 Guest

    wrote:
    > One of my networked computers can't connect to the 'net.
    >
    > I have two PCs, a Pentium 2300 and a Celeron 400, connected to a four
    > port ADSL router [ Dlink 504T ].
    > The router does not run DHCP, the three units are given DNSs...
    > Router 192.168.1.1 Pentium 192.168.1.2 Celeron 192.168.1.3


    Just because you have assigned a static of 192.168.1.x IP to a machine
    doesn't mean it's able to access the Internet, when there is something
    wrong.
    >
    > Using the Pentium, I can connect to the 'net, and ping all three
    > addresses. It's OK.


    That has nothing to do with it, because that machine has no problem with
    accessing the WAN or LAN, with any DHCP or static IP assigned to it.
    >
    > Using the router I can ping the Pentium and the router itself, but NOT
    > the Celeron.


    Well, the problem is with that one machine and not the others. You can
    verify that there is something wrong with that one machine by
    configuring the machine's NIC to us a DHCP IP from the router. If the IP
    comes back 0 or starts 169.254, then there is something wrong with that
    one machine's connection between it and the router. The 169.254 is a
    time out IP the O/S gives the NIC in a DHCP server situation.

    The 169.254 will allow it to communicate with other machines on the LAN,
    but it will not allow the machine to access the Internet nor will it
    allow it to access the router's admin set-up using the router's Device
    IP in a browser session, because it's not using an IP on the router
    that's going to allow it. Of course, if the IP came back 0, the machine
    will have no communication period.

    You can even verify that there is a problem with that one machine, even
    if you have assigned a static IP to machine. If the machine cannot
    access the Device IP of the router through a browser to get to the
    router's admin screen, like the other machines that have a good
    connection can do, then there is a problem with the connection with that
    one machine.
    >
    > Using the Celeron I can ping all three addresses, but Opera [ and
    > Firefox ] cannot find any URL I enter and connect to the 'net.
    >
    > I have tried resetting many of the values in both the Celeron and the
    > router, but can't get the Celeron to connect to the 'net.


    I suggest that you come away from the static IP usage for the NIC and
    use a DHCP IP to verify that the machine can get a DHCP IP from the
    router, that's going to allow it to access the Internet.
    >
    > Sure would appreciate a hint / help/ guide with this problem.
    >


    It could be that the LAN port of the router the machine is using is bad,
    if you have not moved the machine's connection to other LAN ports on the
    router to verify.

    It could be a bad network cable the machine is using, if you have not
    tried other cables.

    The NIC itself may be bad if you have not tried other NIC's in the machine.

    The machine could have malware that has hosed up the TCP/IP Stack,
    preventing the machine for accessing the Internet. You can verify by
    using DHCP on the machine and using IPconfig /release and IPconfig
    /renew at the DOS prompt to see if the machine can get an IP from the
    DHCP server on the router.

    It may come down to you resetting the TCP/IP Stack, use Google and look
    it up based on the O/S you're using and then trying to get the machine
    to get a DHCP IP from the router.

    If the machine can get a DHCP IP from the router, then OK, it can use a
    static IP on the router with success. If it cannot get one, then
    something is wrong. You using a static IP is only hidding the problem.

    Duane :)
     
    Mr. Arnold6, Nov 30, 2006
    #2
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  3. Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-11-30, <> wrote:

    snip

    > Using the Celeron I can ping all three addresses, but Opera [ and
    > Firefox ] cannot find any URL I enter and connect to the 'net.


    snip

    That sounds like a DNS problem. What is the DNS server set up in the OS
    running on that machine? Is there a Hosts file and if so, what does that
    file contain?

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Nov 30, 2006
    #3
  4. Howdy!

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > One of my networked computers can't connect to the 'net.
    >
    > I have two PCs, a Pentium 2300 and a Celeron 400, connected to a four
    > port ADSL router [ Dlink 504T ].
    > The router does not run DHCP, the three units are given DNSs...
    > Router 192.168.1.1 Pentium 192.168.1.2 Celeron 192.168.1.3


    Ahem. You've assigned IP addresses to them, not DNSes.

    Now, what's the netmask, what's the gateway, and what ARE the DNS
    entries for the two computers? That will help fix the problem, I bet.

    Using terminalogy like they're magic incantations without paying any
    attention to what the abbreviations MEAN usually means you're not quite
    knowledgable about what you're doing, and have probably screwed up a network
    setting.

    Now for a silly question - why not allow the router to hand out IPs
    via DHCP? If you do, at least the netmask and gateways will be coherent.

    RwP
     
    Ralph Wade Phillips, Dec 1, 2006
    #4
  5. Guest

    On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 11:44:39 GMT, "Mr. Arnold6"
    <TheDog@It's-A-Dog'sWorld66.COM> wrote:

    > wrote:
    >> One of my networked computers can't connect to the 'net.
    >>
    >> I have two PCs, a Pentium 2300 and a Celeron 400, connected to a four
    >> port ADSL router [ Dlink 504T ].
    >> The router does not run DHCP, the three units are given DNSs...
    >> Router 192.168.1.1 Pentium 192.168.1.2 Celeron 192.168.1.3

    >
    >Just because you have assigned a static of 192.168.1.x IP to a machine
    >doesn't mean it's able to access the Internet, when there is something
    >wrong.
    >>
    >> Using the Pentium, I can connect to the 'net, and ping all three
    >> addresses. It's OK.

    >
    >That has nothing to do with it, because that machine has no problem with
    >accessing the WAN or LAN, with any DHCP or static IP assigned to it.
    >>
    >> Using the router I can ping the Pentium and the router itself, but NOT
    >> the Celeron.

    >
    >Well, the problem is with that one machine and not the others. You can
    >verify that there is something wrong with that one machine by
    >configuring the machine's NIC to us a DHCP IP from the router. If the IP
    >comes back 0 or starts 169.254, then there is something wrong with that
    >one machine's connection between it and the router. The 169.254 is a
    >time out IP the O/S gives the NIC in a DHCP server situation.
    >
    >The 169.254 will allow it to communicate with other machines on the LAN,
    >but it will not allow the machine to access the Internet nor will it
    >allow it to access the router's admin set-up using the router's Device
    >IP in a browser session, because it's not using an IP on the router
    >that's going to allow it. Of course, if the IP came back 0, the machine
    >will have no communication period.
    >
    >You can even verify that there is a problem with that one machine, even
    >if you have assigned a static IP to machine. If the machine cannot
    >access the Device IP of the router through a browser to get to the
    >router's admin screen, like the other machines that have a good
    >connection can do, then there is a problem with the connection with that
    >one machine.
    >>
    >> Using the Celeron I can ping all three addresses, but Opera [ and
    >> Firefox ] cannot find any URL I enter and connect to the 'net.
    >>
    >> I have tried resetting many of the values in both the Celeron and the
    >> router, but can't get the Celeron to connect to the 'net.

    >
    >I suggest that you come away from the static IP usage for the NIC and
    >use a DHCP IP to verify that the machine can get a DHCP IP from the
    >router, that's going to allow it to access the Internet.
    >>
    >> Sure would appreciate a hint / help/ guide with this problem.
    >>

    >
    >It could be that the LAN port of the router the machine is using is bad,
    >if you have not moved the machine's connection to other LAN ports on the
    >router to verify.
    >
    >It could be a bad network cable the machine is using, if you have not
    >tried other cables.
    >
    >The NIC itself may be bad if you have not tried other NIC's in the machine.
    >
    >The machine could have malware that has hosed up the TCP/IP Stack,
    >preventing the machine for accessing the Internet. You can verify by
    >using DHCP on the machine and using IPconfig /release and IPconfig
    >/renew at the DOS prompt to see if the machine can get an IP from the
    >DHCP server on the router.
    >
    >It may come down to you resetting the TCP/IP Stack, use Google and look
    >it up based on the O/S you're using and then trying to get the machine
    >to get a DHCP IP from the router.
    >
    >If the machine can get a DHCP IP from the router, then OK, it can use a
    >static IP on the router with success. If it cannot get one, then
    >something is wrong. You using a static IP is only hidding the problem.


    First. Thanks to you and to messrs Whiskers and Ralph Wade Phillips
    for the help and info.

    In response to your help and direction...

    I had earlier tried substution of the cable from the PC to the router,
    and tried using another entry socket on the router - all with no
    change and no success.

    I have reset the NIC on the Celeron to DHCP.
    After that I ran ipconfig: I got the response that the PC has a DHCP
    IP of 192.168.1.3 [ same as the IP I gave it manually ].
    Note. I did not reset the router to DHCP.

    Now from the Celeron I can ping _everything_ succesfully...

    17.0.0.1
    192.168.1.1
    192.168.1.2
    192.168.1.3

    and finally from the Celeron I can ping Google.com, which tells me I
    am getting out to the 'net [?]

    But MSIE and FF still give errors of not being able to find any URL
    adressess I enter.

    Did I miss something in your directions? or,
    do I have to manipulate the TCP/IP stack [ shudder ]
    John Hewitt, Malaga, Spain

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    , Dec 1, 2006
    #5
  6. Mr. Arnold6 Guest

    wrote:
    > On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 11:44:39 GMT, "Mr. Arnold6"
    > <TheDog@It's-A-Dog'sWorld66.COM> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>One of my networked computers can't connect to the 'net.
    >>>
    >>>I have two PCs, a Pentium 2300 and a Celeron 400, connected to a four
    >>>port ADSL router [ Dlink 504T ].
    >>>The router does not run DHCP, the three units are given DNSs...
    >>>Router 192.168.1.1 Pentium 192.168.1.2 Celeron 192.168.1.3

    >>
    >>Just because you have assigned a static of 192.168.1.x IP to a machine
    >>doesn't mean it's able to access the Internet, when there is something
    >>wrong.
    >>
    >>>Using the Pentium, I can connect to the 'net, and ping all three
    >>>addresses. It's OK.

    >>
    >>That has nothing to do with it, because that machine has no problem with
    >>accessing the WAN or LAN, with any DHCP or static IP assigned to it.
    >>
    >>>Using the router I can ping the Pentium and the router itself, but NOT
    >>>the Celeron.

    >>
    >>Well, the problem is with that one machine and not the others. You can
    >>verify that there is something wrong with that one machine by
    >>configuring the machine's NIC to us a DHCP IP from the router. If the IP
    >>comes back 0 or starts 169.254, then there is something wrong with that
    >>one machine's connection between it and the router. The 169.254 is a
    >>time out IP the O/S gives the NIC in a DHCP server situation.
    >>
    >>The 169.254 will allow it to communicate with other machines on the LAN,
    >>but it will not allow the machine to access the Internet nor will it
    >>allow it to access the router's admin set-up using the router's Device
    >>IP in a browser session, because it's not using an IP on the router
    >>that's going to allow it. Of course, if the IP came back 0, the machine
    >>will have no communication period.
    >>
    >>You can even verify that there is a problem with that one machine, even
    >>if you have assigned a static IP to machine. If the machine cannot
    >>access the Device IP of the router through a browser to get to the
    >>router's admin screen, like the other machines that have a good
    >>connection can do, then there is a problem with the connection with that
    >>one machine.
    >>
    >>>Using the Celeron I can ping all three addresses, but Opera [ and
    >>>Firefox ] cannot find any URL I enter and connect to the 'net.
    >>>
    >>>I have tried resetting many of the values in both the Celeron and the
    >>>router, but can't get the Celeron to connect to the 'net.

    >>
    >>I suggest that you come away from the static IP usage for the NIC and
    >>use a DHCP IP to verify that the machine can get a DHCP IP from the
    >>router, that's going to allow it to access the Internet.
    >>
    >>>Sure would appreciate a hint / help/ guide with this problem.
    >>>

    >>
    >>It could be that the LAN port of the router the machine is using is bad,
    >>if you have not moved the machine's connection to other LAN ports on the
    >>router to verify.
    >>
    >>It could be a bad network cable the machine is using, if you have not
    >>tried other cables.
    >>
    >>The NIC itself may be bad if you have not tried other NIC's in the machine.
    >>
    >>The machine could have malware that has hosed up the TCP/IP Stack,
    >>preventing the machine for accessing the Internet. You can verify by
    >>using DHCP on the machine and using IPconfig /release and IPconfig
    >>/renew at the DOS prompt to see if the machine can get an IP from the
    >>DHCP server on the router.
    >>
    >>It may come down to you resetting the TCP/IP Stack, use Google and look
    >>it up based on the O/S you're using and then trying to get the machine
    >>to get a DHCP IP from the router.
    >>
    >>If the machine can get a DHCP IP from the router, then OK, it can use a
    >>static IP on the router with success. If it cannot get one, then
    >>something is wrong. You using a static IP is only hidding the problem.

    >
    >
    > First. Thanks to you and to messrs Whiskers and Ralph Wade Phillips
    > for the help and info.
    >
    > In response to your help and direction...
    >
    > I had earlier tried substution of the cable from the PC to the router,
    > and tried using another entry socket on the router - all with no
    > change and no success.


    OK

    >
    > I have reset the NIC on the Celeron to DHCP.
    > After that I ran ipconfig: I got the response that the PC has a DHCP
    > IP of 192.168.1.3 [ same as the IP I gave it manually ].
    > Note. I did not reset the router to DHCP.


    Note, in order for the machine to get a DHCP IP from the router, the
    router must have its DHCP server enabled on the router. The machine
    couldn't get a DHCP IP from the router, because it's not enabled, which
    the IP should be in the range of DHCP IP server ranges of IP(s) that can
    issued by the DHCP server. The first DHCP IP would most likely be
    starting at 192.168.1.100, I would think. But you'll have to read your
    manual to see what the start IP the DHCP server will issue.

    Any IP(s) before the start of the DHCP IP range or after the DHCP IP
    range, based the DHCP server Issue Count, are static IP(s) not issuable
    by the DHCP server on the router. The static and DHCP IP(s) are in the
    192.168.1.x range, most likely. However, you have not made mention of
    the router make or model, therefore, I don't know where the DHCP IP
    range starts and ends, read your manual.

    An IP such as 192.168.2.1 is also a static IP not issuable by the DHCP
    server on the router. But, you should use static IP(s) in the range of
    whatever the DHCP IP cannot issue, if the DHCP server on the router is
    in the 192.168.1.x range of IP(s).

    On top of that, when you disabled the DHCP server on the router, it's no
    longer a router. You're not getting the full protection of the router to
    protect the LAN, because it's not in router mode when you disabled the
    DHCP server on the router. All you have now is a smart *switch*.

    >
    > Now from the Celeron I can ping _everything_ succesfully...
    >
    > 17.0.0.1


    What's that up above, it don't look right?

    > 192.168.1.1
    > 192.168.1.2
    > 192.168.1.3


    What's the Device IP of the router? Is it 192.168.1.1
    >
    > and finally from the Celeron I can ping Google.com, which tells me I
    > am getting out to the 'net [?]


    I don't know what you're talking about here. And why are you trying to
    use static IP(s) instead of DHCP IP(s) that the router issues? It seems
    you need to keep this simple, possibly

    >
    > But MSIE and FF still give errors of not being able to find any URL
    > adressess I enter.
    >
    > Did I miss something in your directions? or,
    > do I have to manipulate the TCP/IP stack [ shudder ]


    Yeah, you might be missing it on the router and machine setup. That
    computer you're talking about cannot get a DHCP IP from the router,
    because the DHCP server is disabled and it's just holding on to what's
    already there for the configuration of the NIC it looks like. You still
    don't know if the computer can even get a DHCP IP from the router.

    All you have right now is what is in the link, because you have disabled
    the DHCP server on the NAT router.

    http://www.homenethelp.com/web/explain/about-hubs-and-switches.asp

    What you want is the NAT router doing what's in the link.

    http://www.homenethelp.com/web/explain/about-NAT.asp

    I don't know what protection on the LAN you're getting from the Internet
    with the setup you have with the router, is just a switch facing the
    Internet, but you need to enable the DHCP server on the router and use
    static IP(s), which are IP(s) not issuable by the DHCP Server on the
    router, when the DHCP server is enabled.
     
    Mr. Arnold6, Dec 1, 2006
    #6
  7. Guest

    On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 19:15:39 -0600, "Ralph Wade Phillips"
    <> wrote:

    >Howdy!
    >
    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> One of my networked computers can't connect to the 'net.
    >>
    >> I have two PCs, a Pentium 2300 and a Celeron 400, connected to a four
    >> port ADSL router [ Dlink 504T ].
    >> The router does not run DHCP, the three units are given DNSs...
    >> Router 192.168.1.1 Pentium 192.168.1.2 Celeron 192.168.1.3

    >
    > Ahem. You've assigned IP addresses to them, not DNSes.
    >
    > Now, what's the netmask, what's the gateway, and what ARE the DNS
    >entries for the two computers? That will help fix the problem, I bet.


    Well based on the advice of Arnold 6, I have changed the PC and the
    router to use DHCP. No change in the problem!
    >
    > Using terminalogy like they're magic incantations without paying any
    >attention to what the abbreviations MEAN usually means you're not quite
    >knowledgable about what you're doing, and have probably screwed up a network
    >setting.


    Appreciate the compliment, and that's likely correct
    >
    > Now for a silly question - why not allow the router to hand out IPs
    >via DHCP? If you do, at least the netmask and gateways will be coherent.


    I thought that "IP(s)" was an acronym for "internet protocol", how
    does "IP" mean an address?

    Well, I did [ see above]. The situation is unchanged, viz.

    Can ping the router and Google.com [ by name ]. but cannot connect to
    any URL through any browser.
    John Hewitt, Malaga, Spain

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    , Dec 5, 2006
    #7
  8. Guest

    On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 16:10:19 +0000, Whiskers
    <> wrote:

    >On 2006-11-30, <> wrote:
    >
    >snip
    >
    >> Using the Celeron I can ping all three addresses, but Opera [ and
    >> Firefox ] cannot find any URL I enter and connect to the 'net.

    >
    >snip
    >
    >That sounds like a DNS problem. What is the DNS server set up in the OS
    >running on that machine?


    The DNS servers are 194.179.1.100 [ a local ISp ya.com] and.
    129.67.1.1 Oxford Univ. services.

    > Is there a Hosts file and if so, what does that
    >file contain?


    Yes there is, it contains about 500K of hosts who are either time
    wasters or virii, or.... based upon the URL
    http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/hosts.htm
    John Hewitt, Malaga, Spain

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    , Dec 5, 2006
    #8
  9. Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-12-05, <> wrote:
    > On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 16:10:19 +0000, Whiskers
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On 2006-11-30, <> wrote:
    >>
    >>snip
    >>
    >>> Using the Celeron I can ping all three addresses, but Opera [ and
    >>> Firefox ] cannot find any URL I enter and connect to the 'net.

    >>
    >>snip
    >>
    >>That sounds like a DNS problem. What is the DNS server set up in the OS
    >>running on that machine?

    >
    > The DNS servers are 194.179.1.100 [ a local ISp ya.com] and.
    > 129.67.1.1 Oxford Univ. services.


    Does your router not have a DNS server of its own? If so, your computer
    should have the local IP number of the router as the DNS server.

    Telefonica own the IP number 194.179.1.100, and they state that their DNS
    servers are 80.58.61.250 and 80.58.61.254 - which should be where your
    router gets its DNS information from (or your computer if the router
    doesn't have a DNS server) if Telefonica are providing the DNS servers for
    your ISP.
    <http://www.telefonicaonline.com/on/pub/servicios/onTOEntrada/0,,entrada+
    atc%2Bv_segmento%2BAHOG%2Bv_idioma%2Bes%2Bmenu_izq%2B2%2Bnodo_izq%2B1%2Bmen
    u_cab_sup%2BCliente%2BambitoAcceso%2Bpub,00.html?uri=%2Fon%2Fio%2Fes%2Faten
    cion%2Fsoporte_tecnico_y_averias%2Finternet%2Fadsl%2Finstalacion%2Finstalac
    ion_adsl.htm> or <http://masl.to/?R5F921F4E>

    Check with <http://acceso.ya.com/> to make sure that you have the correct
    configuration of your modem/router and computer (assuming that Ya.com is
    in fact your ISP - you only describe is as "a local ISp"; you can't expect
    to use their DNS service if they aren't /your/ ISP!).

    I would be surprised if Oxford University's DNS servers are available for
    public use - how did you get that number?
    <http://welcometoit.ox.ac.uk/wit_net.html>

    There are DNS servers available publicly; eg
    <http://www.opennic.unrated.net/public_servers.html>

    >> Is there a Hosts file and if so, what does that
    >>file contain?

    >
    > Yes there is, it contains about 500K of hosts who are either time
    > wasters or virii, or.... based upon the URL
    > http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/hosts.htm
    > John Hewitt, Malaga, Spain


    Sheesh. A list that big is very difficult to keep track of, and could
    easily block things unexpectedly.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Dec 5, 2006
    #9
  10. why? Guest

    On Tue, 05 Dec 2006 21:33:11 +0100, wrote:

    >On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 19:15:39 -0600, "Ralph Wade Phillips"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>Howdy!
    >>
    >><> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> One of my networked computers can't connect to the 'net.
    >>>
    >>> I have two PCs, a Pentium 2300 and a Celeron 400, connected to a four
    >>> port ADSL router [ Dlink 504T ].
    >>> The router does not run DHCP, the three units are given DNSs...
    >>> Router 192.168.1.1 Pentium 192.168.1.2 Celeron 192.168.1.3


    < snip>

    >> Using terminalogy like they're magic incantations without paying any
    >>attention to what the abbreviations MEAN usually means you're not quite
    >>knowledgable about what you're doing, and have probably screwed up a network
    >>setting.

    >
    >Appreciate the compliment, and that's likely correct
    >>
    >> Now for a silly question - why not allow the router to hand out IPs
    >>via DHCP? If you do, at least the netmask and gateways will be coherent.

    >
    >I thought that "IP(s)" was an acronym for "internet protocol", how
    >does "IP" mean an address?


    TCP/IP

    Transmission Control Protocol - connects hosts , data exchange.

    Internet Protocol - specifies format of packets, and the addressing
    scheme.

    IP does a couple of things including addressing. So IP address , is an
    identifier for a computer or device on a TCP/IP network.

    TCP/IP - together establish a link and the address between systems.

    Swiped from http://www.webopedia.com

    <snip>

    Me
     
    why?, Dec 6, 2006
    #10
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