Rotating to the left movie frames taken in vertical

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by cgc88, Jan 11, 2004.

  1. cgc88

    cgc88 Guest

    I made some movies with my Canon PS 45 but holding the camera in vertical,
    because the scene extended in vertical. I expected the camera would rotate
    it when playing, as for the photos. It didn't, and also when I play the
    movie with Quicktime or other player, I see the images in the movie in
    vertical. What kind of software is there to rotate 90° to the left (or to
    the right) the frames of the movie? Any hints?

    I tried the ArcSoft Video Impression V1.7 program that comes with the camera
    but it hasn't any rotate capability, nor the Ulead Media Studio Pro 5.0
    Video Edition that I had with a previous Matrox Rainbow Runner video capture
    card.
    I asked this question to Canon and they answered sharply to use a software
    program for video acquisition, like Pinnacle Studio, Adobe Premiere, or
    Presto!
    So I downloaded the Adobe Premiere trial version but it works only with
    Windows XP and I have Windows 2000. I reverted to download the Pinnacle
    Studio 7.0 trial version, installed it and it runs, but still I don't see
    any way to rotate 90° to the left ALL frames (or even each single frame).
    The trial version doesn't allow for some features, but even the help
    function say nothing about rotating frames.
    Presto! programs were only for sale, no trial version.
    I have seven small movies to correct, for say 5 minutes in total time.
    I wonder if anyone has incurred in the same problem and if there is an easy
    way to do the job.
    Apologize for the long question, and thank a lot in advance for any help.
     
    cgc88, Jan 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. cgc88

    Ed Ruf Guest

    On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 23:00:49 GMT, in rec.photo.digital "cgc88"
    <> wrote:

    >I made some movies with my Canon PS 45 but holding the camera in vertical,
    >because the scene extended in vertical. I expected the camera would rotate
    >it when playing, as for the photos. It didn't, and also when I play the
    >movie with Quicktime or other player, I see the images in the movie in
    >vertical. What kind of software is there to rotate 90° to the left (or to
    >the right) the frames of the movie? Any hints?


    >I have seven small movies to correct, for say 5 minutes in total time.
    >I wonder if anyone has incurred in the same problem and if there is an easy
    >way to do the job.


    http://www.radgametools.com/
    ________________________________________________________
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    http://members.cox.net/egruf
    See images taken with my CP-990 and 5700 at
    http://members.cox.net/egruf-digicam
     
    Ed Ruf, Jan 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. Try the following link:

    http://gnuwin.epfl.ch/apps/virtualdub/en/

    This is for Virtual Dub, I had the same question posted here last
    year, someone suggested this program, I tried it and it worked great.
    Free, too.

    Regards,
    John Scurlock
     
    John Scurlock, Jan 12, 2004
    #3
  4. (John Scurlock) wrote:

    >Try the following link:
    >
    >http://gnuwin.epfl.ch/apps/virtualdub/en/
    >
    >This is for Virtual Dub, I had the same question posted here last
    >year, someone suggested this program, I tried it and it worked great.
    >Free, too.


    John,

    I can confirm this. Made the same mistake of recording movies in
    portrait format. VirtualDub has a rotation filter.

    I was even able to join movie clips with dissimilar orientation
    by adding black stripes to make them square.

    The general recommendation, however, is never to record movie
    clips in portrait orientation, for various reasons.

    Hans-Georg

    --
    No mail, please.
     
    Hans-Georg Michna, Jan 12, 2004
    #4
  5. cgc88

    Guest

    Hans-Georg Michna <> wrote:

    >The general recommendation, however, is never to record movie
    >clips in portrait orientation, for various reasons.


    As long as they can be rotated for "normal" playback, why not?
     
    , Jan 12, 2004
    #5
  6. writes:

    > Hans-Georg Michna <> wrote:
    >
    > >The general recommendation, however, is never to record movie
    > >clips in portrait orientation, for various reasons.

    >
    > As long as they can be rotated for "normal" playback, why not?


    I do video clips on my Nikon CoolPix 990 in portrait mode all the time,
    then rotate them in QT Pro. I have no idea what various reasons exist for
    using landscape orientation only -- I don't take still pictures in
    landscape only.
    --
    Philip Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
    Legal Assistance on the Web | spam and read later. email to philip@
    http://www.PhilipStripling.com/ | my domain is read daily.
     
    Phil Stripling, Jan 12, 2004
    #6
  7. wrote:

    >Hans-Georg Michna <> wrote:


    >>The general recommendation, however, is never to record movie
    >>clips in portrait orientation, for various reasons.


    >As long as they can be rotated for "normal" playback, why not?


    Because it is difficult to insert them into a movie that is
    normally oriented. (I know what I'm talking about---I've done
    it.)

    Because most screens and projectors are not oriented that way.

    Because some software (for example Microsoft's Movie Maker)
    can't handle them.

    Because rotating them is still awkward work.

    And I guess I'm forgetting some more reasons.

    Hans-Georg

    --
    No mail, please.
     
    Hans-Georg Michna, Jan 12, 2004
    #7
  8. Phil Stripling <> wrote:

    >I don't take still pictures in landscape only.


    Phil,

    neither do I, but the only place where portrait orientation
    makes sense is on paper. Screens and projectors are almost
    exclusively landscape-oriented, so portrait orientation makes no
    sense on them. You're essentially only cutting off the sides.

    Portrait is perfect for prints though, particularly for large
    ones.

    Hans-Georg

    --
    No mail, please.
     
    Hans-Georg Michna, Jan 12, 2004
    #8
  9. cgc88

    Ed Ruf Guest

    On Mon, 12 Jan 2004 22:53:29 +0100, in rec.photo.digital Hans-Georg Michna
    <> wrote:

    >>>As long as they can be rotated for "normal" playback, why not?


    >Because most screens and projectors are not oriented that way.


    So one then never watches a letterboxed movie on an older 4:3 TV or
    conversely never watches 4:3 programming on a 16:9 widescreen TV?And
    everyone must have a THX certified home theater sound system? I guess I
    should also throw away all my IMAX filmed laserdiscs and DVDs, because
    viewing them on my pathetic 31" flatscreen is sacrilege and I can not
    obviously enjoy them as presented this way.

    I use portrait mode to document my experiments, as it sometimes makes the
    best use of the available pixels. I should throw away this information for
    the sake of what?

    >Because some software (for example Microsoft's Movie Maker)
    >can't handle them.


    MS Word doesn't do well in composing long technical documents with hundreds
    of figures included, so I never document my research? Or do I use a tool
    such as Framemaker instead which handles my requirements?

    >Because rotating them is still awkward work.


    Virtualdub and Rad Video Tool's Bink are both free tools which do this and
    all it takes is a few clicks.

    Do you now see how limited and shallow this perspective is? Everyone's
    photography, still or motion, is not high art. Please don't impose those
    limitations and restrictions you feel bound to on others where the shoe may
    not fit.
    ________________________________________________________
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    http://members.cox.net/egruf
    See images taken with my CP-990 and 5700 at
    http://members.cox.net/egruf-digicam
     
    Ed Ruf, Jan 12, 2004
    #9
  10. Ed,

    I take exception to your criticism and demand that you cease and
    desist from creating movies in portrait mode immediately. If
    this order is not obeyed, I will come to your place and spit
    into your front yard.

    Hans-Georg

    --
    No mail, please.
     
    Hans-Georg Michna, Jan 13, 2004
    #10
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