Rookie Battery Question about Canon S3

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Les Stewart, Aug 10, 2007.

  1. Les Stewart

    Les Stewart Guest

    Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use Canon
    AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH rechargeable
    is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by using standard
    disposable AA alkaline batteries.

    I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just want
    to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.

    THANKS!
    --
    Les Stewart
    Beaumont, TX
     
    Les Stewart, Aug 10, 2007
    #1
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  2. Les Stewart

    Bob Williams Guest

    Les Stewart wrote:
    > Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use Canon
    > AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH rechargeable
    > is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by using standard
    > disposable AA alkaline batteries.
    >
    > I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just want
    > to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.
    >
    > THANKS!


    According to Steves Digicams, it is OK to use Alkaline batteries.
    See: http://www.steves-digicams.com/2006_reviews/s3is.html#specs
    Bob Williams
     
    Bob Williams, Aug 10, 2007
    #2
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  3. "Les Stewart" <> wrote in message
    news:q_Qui.44884$...
    > Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use Canon
    > AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH
    > rechargeable is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by
    > using standard disposable AA alkaline batteries.
    >
    > I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just
    > want to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.


    You can use normal Alkaline. I tend to use Panasonic Oxyride and also
    Energiser Lithium AA cells in my S3 IS without issue.
     
    Jack Torrence, Aug 10, 2007
    #3
  4. Les Stewart

    Mark B. Guest

    "Bob Williams" <> wrote in message
    news:n6Uui.44542$...
    > Les Stewart wrote:
    >> Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use
    >> Canon AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH
    >> rechargeable is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by
    >> using standard disposable AA alkaline batteries.
    >>
    >> I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just
    >> want to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.
    >>
    >> THANKS!

    >
    > According to Steves Digicams, it is OK to use Alkaline batteries.


    Alkalines are inluded, but do not use them on a regular basis unless you
    enjoy throwing money and batteries away. They'll die very shortly. The
    included batteries will allow you to test the camera, nothing else. Any
    name brand NiMH are fine, along with a good charger. If you use the camera
    infrequently, take a look at Sanyo Eneloops - they hold their charge far
    longer than standard NiMH.

    Mark
     
    Mark B., Aug 10, 2007
    #4
  5. Les Stewart

    Mark B. Guest

    "Jack Torrence" <room217[at]overlook.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:46bc10b7$...
    > "Les Stewart" <> wrote in message
    > news:q_Qui.44884$...
    >> Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use
    >> Canon AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH
    >> rechargeable is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by
    >> using standard disposable AA alkaline batteries.
    >>
    >> I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just
    >> want to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.

    >
    > You can use normal Alkaline. I tend to use Panasonic Oxyride and also
    > Energiser Lithium AA cells in my S3 IS without issue.
    >


    Energizer Lithium are not the same as normal Alkaline, and it seems the
    Panny Oxyrides are probably similar to the Energizer Lithium. Good choices
    if you're on a trip where you'll be away from a power source, or as a
    backup. As I stated in my other reply, forget about alkalines in a digital
    camera. Rechargeable NiMH or the new technology NiMH like Sanyo Eneloops
    are the way to go, with a good charger.

    Mark
     
    Mark B., Aug 10, 2007
    #5
  6. Les Stewart

    Alex Monro Guest

    Les Stewart wrote:

    > Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use
    > Canon AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH
    > rechargeable is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by
    > using standard disposable AA alkaline batteries.
    >
    > I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just
    > want to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.
    >

    The only harm you might do by using standard alkaline AAs is to your
    wallet, and possibly the environment.

    Your best bet is probably the low self discharge rechargeable NiMH, such
    as the Sanyo Eneloop, Uniross Hybrio or Rayovac Hybrid. These hold
    their charge for up to a year or so. There are also high capacity
    disposable very long shelf life (~10 years!) lithium AA batteries, but
    they are expensive and hard to find. Good for an emergency reserve
    though.
     
    Alex Monro, Aug 10, 2007
    #6
  7. "Mark B." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Jack Torrence" <room217[at]overlook.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:46bc10b7$...
    >> "Les Stewart" <> wrote in message
    >> news:q_Qui.44884$...
    >>> Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use
    >>> Canon AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH
    >>> rechargeable is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by
    >>> using standard disposable AA alkaline batteries.
    >>>
    >>> I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just
    >>> want to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.

    >>
    >> You can use normal Alkaline. I tend to use Panasonic Oxyride and also
    >> Energiser Lithium AA cells in my S3 IS without issue.
    >>

    >
    > Energizer Lithium are not the same as normal Alkaline, and it seems the
    > Panny Oxyrides are probably similar to the Energizer Lithium. Good
    > choices if you're on a trip where you'll be away from a power source, or
    > as a backup. As I stated in my other reply, forget about alkalines in a
    > digital camera.


    Rechargables may suit your needs but they don't mine. I'll continue to use
    Oxyrides and Lithium thank you.
     
    Jack Torrence, Aug 10, 2007
    #7
  8. Les Stewart

    Ray Paseur Guest

    "Les Stewart" <> wrote in
    news:q_Qui.44884$:

    > Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use
    > Canon AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH
    > rechargeable is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by
    > using standard disposable AA alkaline batteries.
    >
    > I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just
    > want to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.
    >
    > THANKS!


    Les: AA batteries are fungible commodities. In my S3 I'ved used lots of
    different AA batteries - no problems at all. My preference is Eneloop.
    HTH, ~Ray
     
    Ray Paseur, Aug 10, 2007
    #8
  9. Les Stewart

    Allen Guest

    Les Stewart wrote:
    > Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use Canon
    > AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH rechargeable
    > is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by using standard
    > disposable AA alkaline batteries.
    >
    > I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just want
    > to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.
    >
    > THANKS!

    Mine came with alkalines packed with it, which I threw into my
    miscellaneous battery bin; I've use only NiMH.
    Allen
     
    Allen, Aug 10, 2007
    #9
  10. Les Stewart

    bluezfolk Guest

    On Aug 10, 5:31 am, "Mark B." <> wrote:
    > "Bob Williams" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:n6Uui.44542$...
    >
    > > Les Stewart wrote:
    > >> Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use
    > >> Canon AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH
    > >> rechargeable is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by
    > >> using standard disposable AA alkaline batteries.

    >
    > >> I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just
    > >> want to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.

    >
    > >> THANKS!

    >
    > > According to Steves Digicams, it is OK to use Alkaline batteries.

    >
    > Alkalines are inluded, but do not use them on a regular basis unless you
    > enjoy throwing money and batteries away. They'll die very shortly. The
    > included batteries will allow you to test the camera, nothing else. Any
    > name brand NiMH are fine, along with a good charger. If you use the camera
    > infrequently, take a look at Sanyo Eneloops - they hold their charge far
    > longer than standard NiMH.
    >
    > Mark


    I've got 2 Canons (neither is an S3) and I primarily use NiMH
    batteries, but if the batteries go low and I don't have others
    available at the moment I have used alkalines and they do work fine
    and I haven't caused any damage. The main reason I haven't bought one
    of those tiny digicams is because they use proprietary batteries and I
    can't use AA alkalines in a pinch.

    Eric
     
    bluezfolk, Aug 10, 2007
    #10
  11. Les Stewart

    ASAAR Guest

    On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 06:35:09 -0400, Mark B. wrote:

    >> You can use normal Alkaline. I tend to use Panasonic Oxyride and also
    >> Energiser Lithium AA cells in my S3 IS without issue.

    >
    > Energizer Lithium are not the same as normal Alkaline, and it seems the
    > Panny Oxyrides are probably similar to the Energizer Lithium. Good
    > choices if you're on a trip where you'll be away from a power source, or as a
    > backup. As I stated in my other reply, forget about alkalines in a digital
    > camera. Rechargeable NiMH or the new technology NiMH like Sanyo
    > Eneloops are the way to go, with a good charger.


    You're quite mistaken about several things. Panasonic's Oxyrides
    are not at all similar to lithium batteries. They much more
    resemble alkalines as they are both based primarily on using
    manganese dioxide and a zinc gel, to which the Oxyrides add nickel
    hydroxide. This formulation is probably what provides them with
    better high current performance. Alkaline batteries have shelf
    lives of 7 to 8 years, and this is the same shelf life claimed by
    Duracell for their PowerPix Oxyride batteries. Lithium batteries
    have shelf lives of about 15 years.

    Oxyrides are better than alkalines for older cameras that have
    very high current demands. For cameras that have low to very low
    current demands (such as a number of Canon's models) Oxyrides won't
    provide any real advantage over alkaline batteries, but they tend to
    cost much more. When there are cameras being sold today that can
    get many hundreds, some approaching 1,000 shots from a set of
    alkaline batteries, making a general statement to "forget about
    alkalines in a digital camera" is ill advised.


    http://panasonic.com.au/products/information.cfm?detailsID=88&contextID=42


    http://panasonic.com.au/products/faqs/details.cfm?detailsID=686&objectID=42&categoryID=0&productID=0


    http://www.photoreporter.com/article.asp?issueID=&num=07&vol=15&articleType=n&articleID=1440
     
    ASAAR, Aug 10, 2007
    #11
  12. Les Stewart

    Mark B. Guest

    "ASAAR" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 06:35:09 -0400, Mark B. wrote:
    >
    >>> You can use normal Alkaline. I tend to use Panasonic Oxyride and also
    >>> Energiser Lithium AA cells in my S3 IS without issue.

    >>
    >> Energizer Lithium are not the same as normal Alkaline, and it seems the
    >> Panny Oxyrides are probably similar to the Energizer Lithium. Good
    >> choices if you're on a trip where you'll be away from a power source, or
    >> as a
    >> backup. As I stated in my other reply, forget about alkalines in a
    >> digital
    >> camera. Rechargeable NiMH or the new technology NiMH like Sanyo
    >> Eneloops are the way to go, with a good charger.

    >
    > You're quite mistaken about several things. Panasonic's Oxyrides
    > are not at all similar to lithium batteries. They much more
    > resemble alkalines as they are both based primarily on using
    > manganese dioxide and a zinc gel, to which the Oxyrides add nickel
    > hydroxide. This formulation is probably what provides them with
    > better high current performance. Alkaline batteries have shelf
    > lives of 7 to 8 years, and this is the same shelf life claimed by
    > Duracell for their PowerPix Oxyride batteries. Lithium batteries
    > have shelf lives of about 15 years.
    >
    > Oxyrides are better than alkalines for older cameras that have
    > very high current demands. For cameras that have low to very low
    > current demands (such as a number of Canon's models) Oxyrides won't
    > provide any real advantage over alkaline batteries, but they tend to
    > cost much more. When there are cameras being sold today that can
    > get many hundreds, some approaching 1,000 shots from a set of
    > alkaline batteries, making a general statement to "forget about
    > alkalines in a digital camera" is ill advised.
    >


    What digicams currently being sold will get this kind of performance from
    alkalines?

    Mar
     
    Mark B., Aug 11, 2007
    #12
  13. Les Stewart

    ASAAR Guest

    On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 21:46:39 -0400, Mark B. wrote:

    >> Oxyrides are better than alkalines for older cameras that have
    >> very high current demands. For cameras that have low to very low
    >> current demands (such as a number of Canon's models) Oxyrides won't
    >> provide any real advantage over alkaline batteries, but they tend to
    >> cost much more. When there are cameras being sold today that can
    >> get many hundreds, some approaching 1,000 shots from a set of
    >> alkaline batteries, making a general statement to "forget about
    >> alkalines in a digital camera" is ill advised.
    >>

    >
    > What digicams currently being sold will get this kind of
    > performance from alkalines?


    Generally, the cameras from Canon and Fuji that use four AA cells.
    Some of the ones that use two AA cells get 1/2 the number of shots,
    as expected, but others don't do as well. The Fuji S5100/S5600 that
    I bought in 2004 was the first I've seen that used the fairly tough
    "CIPA (Camera & Imaging Products Association) standard procedure
    for measuring digital still camera battery consumption". It a
    number of things such as using a full powered flash for every second
    shot taken, zooming the lens from full wide to full tele and back
    every 30 seconds, turning the camera off and on again after every 10
    shots, and that the LCD or EVF viewfinder should be turned on. It
    was rated at only 200 shots for alkaline batteries and 400 if using
    2,300mAh NiMH cells. From what I had read about using alkaline
    cells in digital camera, I didn't think that they would do very
    well, so I didn't use the four Panasonic batteries (standard
    alkalines, not Oxyrides) that were included with the camera. When I
    read what the manual said about battery performance 1/2 year later,
    I decided to test those batteries using the CIPA guidelines. I got
    about 220 shots from them before the camera shut down due to low
    voltage.

    Being curious, and familiar with alkaline's voltage rebound, I
    decided to continue shooting, but without using the flash any more.
    Unlike some other cameras, the Fuji doesn't have an optical
    viewfinder, so I had to continue shooting with the EVF turned on.
    Over the next several days the shot count increased by more than
    another 400 shots. At that time I saw no need to see if the
    batteries could reach 700 or 800 shots, so I sent them off to
    battery heaven. :) Newer versions of the S5100 (S5200/S5600) rate
    higher numbers using CIPA testing, 250 and 500 shots per charge.

    Canon's A6x0 line of cameras do even better than my Fuji. Using
    the same CIPA procedure the A610/A620 are rated at 350 shots using
    alkalines and 500 shots using 2,300mAh NiMH cells. Canon, however,
    also lists the battery performance for people that don't need to use
    the flash and prefer using the optical viewfinder. For those
    conditions, alkaline batteries are rated at 1,200 shots and NiMH at
    1,500 shots. Canon also provides the playback time for using the
    LCD display, and both battery types are rated at 16 2/3 hours. The
    current models (A630, A640) do about the same for taking still
    pictures, but the LCD playback time increased to 20 hours. While I
    don't recall the models, a few (not many) of Kodak's and Nikon's
    cameras also have very good battery performance.
     
    ASAAR, Aug 11, 2007
    #13
  14. Les Stewart

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Alex Monro wrote:
    > Les Stewart wrote:
    >
    >> Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use
    >> Canon AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH
    >> rechargeable is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by
    >> using standard disposable AA alkaline batteries.
    >>
    >> I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just
    >> want to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.
    >>

    > The only harm you might do by using standard alkaline AAs is to your
    > wallet, and possibly the environment.
    >
    > Your best bet is probably the low self discharge rechargeable NiMH, such
    > as the Sanyo Eneloop, Uniross Hybrio or Rayovac Hybrid. These hold
    > their charge for up to a year or so. There are also high capacity
    > disposable very long shelf life (~10 years!) lithium AA batteries, but
    > they are expensive and hard to find. Good for an emergency reserve
    > though.


    I have had a set of the Energizer Lithium disposables in my wife's
    camera since December. They are still going strong. For cameras used
    very rarely, they are a good choice (I pay only a little over $1 each
    for them), and are a excellent choice for backup to a set of NiMH
    batteries as they are light in weight, and have great power density to
    weight ratio.
    The Eneloop batteries are also a good solution for cameras used only on
    special occasions.
     
    Ron Hunter, Aug 11, 2007
    #14
  15. Les Stewart

    Dave Cohen Guest

    Ron Hunter wrote:
    > Alex Monro wrote:
    >> Les Stewart wrote:
    >>
    >>> Recently purchased a Canon S3 SI camera. The manual says to only use
    >>> Canon AA NIMH rechargeable batteries. Now I assume any brand of NIMH
    >>> rechargeable is ok, but am I doing any harm or causing any problems by
    >>> using standard disposable AA alkaline batteries.
    >>>
    >>> I realize there is a difference in expense and battery life...... just
    >>> want to make sure I am not doing anything really stupid.
    >>>

    >> The only harm you might do by using standard alkaline AAs is to your
    >> wallet, and possibly the environment.
    >>
    >> Your best bet is probably the low self discharge rechargeable NiMH, such
    >> as the Sanyo Eneloop, Uniross Hybrio or Rayovac Hybrid. These hold
    >> their charge for up to a year or so. There are also high capacity
    >> disposable very long shelf life (~10 years!) lithium AA batteries, but
    >> they are expensive and hard to find. Good for an emergency reserve
    >> though.

    >
    > I have had a set of the Energizer Lithium disposables in my wife's
    > camera since December. They are still going strong. For cameras used
    > very rarely, they are a good choice (I pay only a little over $1 each
    > for them), and are a excellent choice for backup to a set of NiMH
    > batteries as they are light in weight, and have great power density to
    > weight ratio.
    > The Eneloop batteries are also a good solution for cameras used only on
    > special occasions.


    Good is an understatement, they're bloody marvelous. Got 652 shots out
    of the package, recharged last October and still going strong at 263
    shots. Camera is canon A95. Mixture of flash on/off, review and download
    from camera to computer. I generally shoot with LCD off. I paid $12 for
    a set at Ritz retail. Hybrid's from Walmart may also be worth a try
    (cheaper). My enthusiasm is based on much poorer performance using
    normal NiMH.
    Dave Cohen
     
    Dave Cohen, Aug 11, 2007
    #15
  16. Les Stewart

    SMS Guest

    Ron Hunter wrote:

    > I have had a set of the Energizer Lithium disposables in my wife's
    > camera since December. They are still going strong. For cameras used
    > very rarely, they are a good choice (I pay only a little over $1 each
    > for them),


    Where do you get the Energizer Lithium cells for $1 each? They're around
    4/$10 around here. There's a guy at the local electronics flea market
    that sometimes has them for less, but I don't know if they are real or
    fakes.
     
    SMS, Aug 11, 2007
    #16
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