Rock concert photo techniques?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner, Jun 9, 2006.

  1. I'm curious what suggestions people have for shooting rock concerts
    at small venues. (I'm sure one regular here will suggest that I stay
    home unless and until I'm an expert, of course. :^) Dunno what he
    thinks we _should_ be doing to become expert; make cranky posts to
    USENET, I guess.) Problems I've encountered include:
    -dim lighting
    -oddly colored lighting
    -lights pointing into the audience from the back of the stage
    -blocking (mike stands, singers with mikes/hands in front of their faces)
    -performers who move around a lot
    Also, what's people's feelings on using flash? I find it necessary most
    of the time, but obviously "flashy" pictures tend to look like crap.
    Any other issues or concerns people have run into?

    So far the best things I've found have been
    -shoot a lot and be prepared to throw away a lot
    -shoot RAW
    -use high ISO
    -use flash and a diffuser
    -have a flash with a quick cycle time (it's a real pain to miss a good
    shot opportunity because your flash wasn't ready again yet)
    -accept the limitations of the scene and use them; it's never going to
    look like a studio portrait, so go for a more impressionistic feel

    Another concern I have is about combinations of ISO/aperture/shutter
    speed for less-than-optimal conditions like this. If you stop down to
    get better depth of field, your exposure time goes up and now that
    guitarist rockin' out has too much motion blur (although flash helps
    with this). If you open up to get better speed, your depth of field
    becomes small and proper focus gets harder, and autofocus doesn't work
    so well in dim light...I guess manual focus is probably the way to go
    for this? Also, if anyone knows of any good books about this topic, or
    even just collections of good concert shots, that would be great.
    Thanks!

    --
    Oh to have a lodge in some vast wilderness. Where rumors of oppression
    and deceit, of unsuccessful and successful wars may never reach me
    anymore.
    -- William Cowper
    Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner, Jun 9, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner

    sonsdad Guest

    Hi
    There is a great book by Jon Sievert, Concert Photography that should help.
    I try to shoot without flash but using a fast lens, I have a Nikon 85mm 1.8
    and 70-210 2.8. You do need to seek permission or you could lose your gear.
    Start in a local bar, bands are often happy that someone is interested in
    taking shots. I am sure you are correct to try using Raw although the read
    speed can be a pain sometimes, My rule is if it moves use JPEG if it is
    still use Raw. Hope this help a bit
    Cheers


    On 9/6/06 17:04, in article e6c660$4em$, "Jeremiah DeWitt
    Weiner" <> wrote:

    > I'm curious what suggestions people have for shooting rock concerts
    > at small venues. (I'm sure one regular here will suggest that I stay
    > home unless and until I'm an expert, of course. :^) Dunno what he
    > thinks we _should_ be doing to become expert; make cranky posts to
    > USENET, I guess.) Problems I've encountered include:
    > -dim lighting
    > -oddly colored lighting
    > -lights pointing into the audience from the back of the stage
    > -blocking (mike stands, singers with mikes/hands in front of their faces)
    > -performers who move around a lot
    > Also, what's people's feelings on using flash? I find it necessary most
    > of the time, but obviously "flashy" pictures tend to look like crap.
    > Any other issues or concerns people have run into?
    >
    > So far the best things I've found have been
    > -shoot a lot and be prepared to throw away a lot
    > -shoot RAW
    > -use high ISO
    > -use flash and a diffuser
    > -have a flash with a quick cycle time (it's a real pain to miss a good
    > shot opportunity because your flash wasn't ready again yet)
    > -accept the limitations of the scene and use them; it's never going to
    > look like a studio portrait, so go for a more impressionistic feel
    >
    > Another concern I have is about combinations of ISO/aperture/shutter
    > speed for less-than-optimal conditions like this. If you stop down to
    > get better depth of field, your exposure time goes up and now that
    > guitarist rockin' out has too much motion blur (although flash helps
    > with this). If you open up to get better speed, your depth of field
    > becomes small and proper focus gets harder, and autofocus doesn't work
    > so well in dim light...I guess manual focus is probably the way to go
    > for this? Also, if anyone knows of any good books about this topic, or
    > even just collections of good concert shots, that would be great.
    > Thanks!
    sonsdad, Jun 9, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner wrote:
    > I'm curious what suggestions people have for shooting rock concerts
    > at small venues. (I'm sure one regular here will suggest that I stay
    > home unless and until I'm an expert, of course. :^) Dunno what he
    > thinks we _should_ be doing to become expert; make cranky posts to
    > USENET, I guess.) Problems I've encountered include:
    > -dim lighting
    > -oddly colored lighting
    > -lights pointing into the audience from the back of the stage
    > -blocking (mike stands, singers with mikes/hands in front of their
    > faces)
    > -performers who move around a lot
    > Also, what's people's feelings on using flash? I find it necessary
    > most of the time, but obviously "flashy" pictures tend to look like
    > crap.
    > Any other issues or concerns people have run into?


    You missed one. The sign on the door that says no cameras allowed and a
    few large bozos to enforce the rule.

    >
    > So far the best things I've found have been
    > -shoot a lot and be prepared to throw away a lot
    > -shoot RAW


    Not bad idea

    > -use high ISO


    Likely, but how good of an idea depends partly on the camera.

    > -use flash and a diffuser


    Some places don't like cameras let alone flashes. Most of the time you
    are not going to have a flash that is powerful enough and you will not be
    close enough to get any benefit from it. Diffuser.. I don't think so, it
    would only reduce the effective working distance for your flash. If you can
    use flash and your flash is powerful enough for the distance, I would not
    use diffuser as for that use, I like the harsh look of the flash.

    > -have a flash with a quick cycle time (it's a real pain to miss a good
    > shot opportunity because your flash wasn't ready again yet)


    Yea, but if you do it often enough, you learn to predict action.

    > -accept the limitations of the scene and use them; it's never going to
    > look like a studio portrait, so go for a more impressionistic feel


    Best advice of the list.

    >
    > Another concern I have is about combinations of ISO/aperture/shutter
    > speed for less-than-optimal conditions like this. If you stop down to
    > get better depth of field,


    DOF will no be a problem unless you are rather close.

    > your exposure time goes up and now that
    > guitarist rockin' out has too much motion blur (although flash helps
    > with this). If you open up to get better speed, your depth of field
    > becomes small and proper focus gets harder, and autofocus doesn't work
    > so well in dim light...I guess manual focus is probably the way to go
    > for this? Also, if anyone knows of any good books about this topic,
    > or even just collections of good concert shots, that would be great.
    > Thanks!


    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
    Joseph Meehan, Jun 9, 2006
    #3
  4. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner wrote:

    > I'm curious what suggestions people have for shooting rock concerts
    > at small venues. (I'm sure one regular here will suggest that I stay
    > home unless and until I'm an expert, of course. :^) Dunno what he
    > thinks we _should_ be doing to become expert; make cranky posts to
    > USENET, I guess.) Problems I've encountered include:
    > -dim lighting
    > -oddly colored lighting
    > -lights pointing into the audience from the back of the stage
    > -blocking (mike stands, singers with mikes/hands in front of their faces)
    > -performers who move around a lot
    > Also, what's people's feelings on using flash? I find it necessary most
    > of the time, but obviously "flashy" pictures tend to look like crap.
    > Any other issues or concerns people have run into?
    >
    > So far the best things I've found have been
    > -shoot a lot and be prepared to throw away a lot
    > -shoot RAW
    > -use high ISO
    > -use flash and a diffuser
    > -have a flash with a quick cycle time (it's a real pain to miss a good
    > shot opportunity because your flash wasn't ready again yet)
    > -accept the limitations of the scene and use them; it's never going to
    > look like a studio portrait, so go for a more impressionistic feel
    >
    > Another concern I have is about combinations of ISO/aperture/shutter
    > speed for less-than-optimal conditions like this. If you stop down to
    > get better depth of field, your exposure time goes up and now that
    > guitarist rockin' out has too much motion blur (although flash helps
    > with this). If you open up to get better speed, your depth of field
    > becomes small and proper focus gets harder, and autofocus doesn't work
    > so well in dim light...I guess manual focus is probably the way to go
    > for this? Also, if anyone knows of any good books about this topic, or
    > even just collections of good concert shots, that would be great.
    > Thanks!
    >

    Not tried it myself and it depends if your gear can do it - but how about
    second curtain flash sync? So you get blurred movement of the artists
    doing their stuff and then the flash will get the detail. A quick google
    should explain it much better than me.
    I would have thought you'd have to be close and with a stable support.

    Jon
    Jonathan Telfer, Jun 9, 2006
    #4
  5. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner

    Gank Guest

    "Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner" <> wrote in message
    news:e6c660$4em$...
    > Also, what's people's feelings on using flash? I find it necessary most
    > of the time, but obviously "flashy" pictures tend to look like crap.


    Not only that but in small venues you will piss off the band members if you
    use flash. When I use to shoot concerts on film cameras I used to use high
    speed film and no flash. Flash from longer distances is useless anyway.
    Gank, Jun 9, 2006
    #5
  6. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner <> writes:

    > I'm curious what suggestions people have for shooting rock concerts
    > at small venues. (I'm sure one regular here will suggest that I stay
    > home unless and until I'm an expert, of course. :^) Dunno what he
    > thinks we _should_ be doing to become expert; make cranky posts to
    > USENET, I guess.) Problems I've encountered include:
    > -dim lighting


    Yep. Digital helps a lot. High ISO, and tungsten balance, does
    things film never touched (I know no reason they *couldn't* have made
    ASA 1600 tungsten film, but they never *did*).

    > -oddly colored lighting


    This is not a problem; you want your pictures to look like the show,
    and if the show is lit in funny colors your pictures should capture
    that.

    > -lights pointing into the audience from the back of the stage


    This causes horrid flare in cheap zooms. Use better lenses, and use
    lens hoods. Then it's just hot-spots.

    > -blocking (mike stands, singers with mikes/hands in front of their faces)


    Move around yourself, and be patient.

    > -performers who move around a lot


    Nothing to be done.

    > Also, what's people's feelings on using flash? I find it necessary most
    > of the time, but obviously "flashy" pictures tend to look like crap.


    Definitely undesirable -- ruins the look of the photos, as you say.
    And the shows often put considerable effort into lighting design,
    which flash then throws away.

    > Any other issues or concerns people have run into?


    > So far the best things I've found have been
    > -shoot a lot and be prepared to throw away a lot


    Yep, even with film. Hundreds of shots for any one keeper usually.

    > -shoot RAW


    Can help, but also a lot of post-processing work and limits bursts.

    > -use high ISO


    Definitely.

    > -use flash and a diffuser
    > -have a flash with a quick cycle time (it's a real pain to miss a good
    > shot opportunity because your flash wasn't ready again yet)


    Yeah, if you're using a flash you need a pro-grade flash, powerful and
    with quick cycling. Probably also an external battery.

    But flash is almost never a good choice for rock shows.

    > -accept the limitations of the scene and use them; it's never going to
    > look like a studio portrait, so go for a more impressionistic feel


    Yes, exactly. That's the key point -- photograph the show that's put
    on, rather than trying to use the show as a venue to photograph
    something you've thought up.

    > Another concern I have is about combinations of ISO/aperture/shutter
    > speed for less-than-optimal conditions like this. If you stop down to
    > get better depth of field, your exposure time goes up and now that
    > guitarist rockin' out has too much motion blur (although flash helps
    > with this). If you open up to get better speed, your depth of field
    > becomes small and proper focus gets harder, and autofocus doesn't work
    > so well in dim light...I guess manual focus is probably the way to go
    > for this? Also, if anyone knows of any good books about this topic, or
    > even just collections of good concert shots, that would be great.


    Now you know why people pay $1600 for the Nikon 70-210mm f/2.8 VR
    lens, or the Canon equivalent, or even longer fast lenses sometimes.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
    David Dyer-Bennet, Jun 9, 2006
    #6
  7. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner

    Guest

    [snip]
    > So far the best things I've found have been
    > -shoot a lot and be prepared to throw away a lot
    > -shoot RAW
    > -use high ISO
    > -use flash and a diffuser
    > -have a flash with a quick cycle time (it's a real pain to miss a good
    > shot opportunity because your flash wasn't ready again yet)
    > -accept the limitations of the scene and use them; it's never going to
    > look like a studio portrait, so go for a more impressionistic feel


    All good starting points -except for the references to the flash. I
    almost always never use a flash - you wash out all the concert
    lighting, so what's the point?

    It's definitely challenging, but that's what I like about it. In a way
    it's easier because the 'scene' is already setup for you. What you see
    is exactly what your shooting conditions are - no need to 'set up'
    anything.

    You basically take some time to study and get to know both the venue
    (lighting, shooting angles, audience, etc...) and the band (songs,
    movement tendencies, placement of the mic, band equipment, etc...) and
    go from there.

    I find shooting wide open is fine. Especially in smaller bars/clubs
    that really have limited lighiting, you need every single packet of
    light to reach the camera sensor. It's not that big of a deal if the
    image isn't the sharpest it could be because you're not shooting at the
    ideal aperture. The two most important elements are getting the correct
    exposure and focus, because without that, nothing else matters.

    Once you have a good handle of your camera and your own abilities, you
    should have a good idea of how steady you can haldhold your camera at
    various focal lengths while still getting a fairly sharp photo.

    Shooting in RAW is great since you can bump up the exposure by a stop
    or two and do your WB corrections as well. After that, I do a bit of
    noise reduction (if needed).

    The best thing to do is just go out there and shoot... you gain a lot
    of knowledge on the field through plain experience and trial-and-error.

    Terence
    , Jun 9, 2006
    #7
  8. Just wanted to say thanks for all the advice offered so far, and
    I'll take it all into consideration. A friend pointed out to me an
    article on concert photography: "Concert, Stage, and Low-Light
    Photography", by Steve Mirarchi.
    http://www.photo.net/learn/concerts/mirarchi/concer_i.htm
    And he does discuss flash usage, interestingly enough, including second
    curtain.

    BTW, I've been lucky enough to find a venue/concert series that does not
    give a wet flap about whether you do your amateur photography there.
    :^)

    --
    Oh to have a lodge in some vast wilderness. Where rumors of oppression
    and deceit, of unsuccessful and successful wars may never reach me
    anymore.
    -- William Cowper
    Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner, Jun 10, 2006
    #8
  9. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner

    EarGuy Guest

    "Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner" <> wrote in message
    news:e6c660$4em$...
    > I'm curious what suggestions people have for shooting rock concerts
    > at small venues.


    Not to sound like an old fogie, but I've been shooting concerts since the
    1970's (amature, audience - we don't need no stinkin' press passes!).

    I learned quick to toss out your automatic exposure. The dark backgrounds
    with illuminated faces will totally screw with your metering. Shoot manual.

    Back in the film days, this was my rule of thumb, and it rarely failed me:

    1. 400 mm film (the fastest available back then)
    2. Shoot wide open aperature
    3. Set shutter speed to 1/125. if the stage was dark, click down to 1/60.
    If the stage was awash in ligh, click up to 1/250..
    4. Get in as close as possible. No one wants to see 50 shots of a big
    stage set.

    I found that print film had enough latitude that this formula got me many
    good prints. Hold that long lens steady, especially if you're shooting
    1/60.

    Now, we have digital. Your camera may have faster ISOs than 400, but you
    have to trade off graininess vs. exposure. I start with the above settings
    and bracket using my on-camera preview. That's what opening acts and
    eraseable memory is for. Unfortunately, digital is less forgiving than
    film.

    No matter what, turn that flash off! It's annoying to your fellow
    concert-goers. It annoys many performers. It may get you thrown out.

    A few other things come to mind: Don't shoot during the first one or two
    songs. Everyone, including you, is excited and jostling around. Give some
    time to calm down before you bring our your camera. Often, the best shots
    are taken between songs because the performers back away from the mike
    stands, and look up from their hands. They might even smile at each other
    and give a high-five. Don't blow all your film/memory early. The lights
    and pyrotechnics are often saved for the last song before the encore.
    Clothing may change for the encores, giving you a varied look.

    Last, remember the great photographer's rule: F8 and be there. As
    inspiration, here are some concert shots taken with a disposable camera. I
    didn't take these, I was at the back of the venue. I do think, however that
    the shooter used flash. But I really liked her use of lens flare, she knew
    when to push the shutter, and her composition is good. I'd like to give her
    a lesson in cropping, though.

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 2/FL000022.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 2/FL000020.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 4/FL000001.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 3/FL000010.jpg

    Have fun!
    Dave
    Earguy
    EarGuy, Jun 11, 2006
    #9
  10. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner

    EarGuy Guest

    "Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner" <> wrote in message
    news:e6c660$4em$...
    > I'm curious what suggestions people have for shooting rock concerts
    > at small venues.


    Not to sound like an old fogie, but I've been shooting concerts since the
    1970's (amature, audience - we don't need no stinkin' press passes!).

    I learned quick to toss out your automatic exposure. The dark backgrounds
    with illuminated faces will totally screw with your metering. Shoot manual.

    Back in the film days, this was my rule of thumb, and it rarely failed me:

    1. 400 mm film (the fastest available back then)
    2. Shoot wide open aperature
    3. Set shutter speed to 1/125. if the stage was dark, click down to 1/60.
    If the stage was awash in ligh, click up to 1/250..
    4. Get in as close as possible. No one wants to see 50 shots of a big
    stage set.

    I found that print film had enough latitude that this formula got me many
    good prints. Hold that long lens steady, especially if you're shooting
    1/60.

    Now, we have digital. Your camera may have faster ISOs than 400, but you
    have to trade off graininess vs. exposure. I start with the above settings
    and bracket using my on-camera preview. That's what opening acts and
    eraseable memory is for. Unfortunately, digital is less forgiving than
    film.

    No matter what, turn that flash off! It's annoying to your fellow
    concert-goers. It annoys many performers. It may get you thrown out.

    A few other things come to mind: Don't shoot during the first one or two
    songs. Everyone, including you, is excited and jostling around. Give some
    time to calm down before you bring our your camera. Often, the best shots
    are taken between songs because the performers back away from the mike
    stands, and look up from their hands. They might even smile at each other
    and give a high-five. Don't blow all your film/memory early. The lights
    and pyrotechnics are often saved for the last song before the encore.
    Clothing may change for the encores, giving you a varied look.

    Last, remember the great photographer's rule: F8 and be there. As
    inspiration, here are some concert shots taken with a disposable camera. I
    didn't take these, I was at the back of the venue. I do think, however that
    the shooter used flash. But I really liked her use of lens flare, she knew
    when to push the shutter, and her composition is good. I'd like to give her
    a lesson in cropping, though.

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 2/FL000022.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 2/FL000020.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 4/FL000001.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 3/FL000010.jpg

    Have fun!
    Dave
    Earguy
    EarGuy, Jun 11, 2006
    #10
  11. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner

    EarGuy Guest

    "Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner" <> wrote in message
    news:e6c660$4em$...
    > I'm curious what suggestions people have for shooting rock concerts
    > at small venues.


    Not to sound like an old fogie, but I've been shooting concerts since the
    1970's (amature, audience - we don't need no stinkin' press passes!).

    I learned quick to toss out your automatic exposure. The dark backgrounds
    with illuminated faces will totally screw with your metering. Shoot manual.

    Back in the film days, this was my rule of thumb, and it rarely failed me:

    1. 400 mm film (the fastest available back then)
    2. Shoot wide open aperature
    3. Set shutter speed to 1/125. if the stage was dark, click down to 1/60.
    If the stage was awash in ligh, click up to 1/250..
    4. Get in as close as possible. No one wants to see 50 shots of a big
    stage set.

    I found that print film had enough latitude that this formula got me many
    good prints. Hold that long lens steady, especially if you're shooting
    1/60.

    Now, we have digital. Your camera may have faster ISOs than 400, but you
    have to trade off graininess vs. exposure. I start with the above settings
    and bracket using my on-camera preview. That's what opening acts and
    eraseable memory is for. Unfortunately, digital is less forgiving than
    film.

    No matter what, turn that flash off! It's annoying to your fellow
    concert-goers. It annoys many performers. It may get you thrown out.

    A few other things come to mind: Don't shoot during the first one or two
    songs. Everyone, including you, is excited and jostling around. Give some
    time to calm down before you bring our your camera. Often, the best shots
    are taken between songs because the performers back away from the mike
    stands, and look up from their hands. They might even smile at each other
    and give a high-five. Don't blow all your film/memory early. The lights
    and pyrotechnics are often saved for the last song before the encore.
    Clothing may change for the encores, giving you a varied look.

    Last, remember the great photographer's rule: F8 and be there. As
    inspiration, here are some concert shots taken with a disposable camera. I
    didn't take these, I was at the back of the venue. I do think, however that
    the shooter used flash. But I really liked her use of lens flare, she knew
    when to push the shutter, and her composition is good. I'd like to give her
    a lesson in cropping, though.

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 2/FL000022.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 2/FL000020.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 4/FL000001.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 3/FL000010.jpg

    Have fun!
    Dave
    Earguy
    EarGuy, Jun 11, 2006
    #11
  12. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner

    EarGuy Guest

    "Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner" <> wrote in message
    news:e6c660$4em$...
    > I'm curious what suggestions people have for shooting rock concerts
    > at small venues.


    Not to sound like an old fogie, but I've been shooting concerts since the
    1970's (amature, audience - we don't need no stinkin' press passes!).

    I learned quick to toss out your automatic exposure. The dark backgrounds
    with illuminated faces will totally screw with your metering. Shoot manual.

    Back in the film days, this was my rule of thumb, and it rarely failed me:

    1. 400 mm film (the fastest available back then)
    2. Shoot wide open aperature
    3. Set shutter speed to 1/125. if the stage was dark, click down to 1/60.
    If the stage was awash in ligh, click up to 1/250..
    4. Get in as close as possible. No one wants to see 50 shots of a big
    stage set.

    I found that print film had enough latitude that this formula got me many
    good prints. Hold that long lens steady, especially if you're shooting
    1/60.

    Now, we have digital. Your camera may have faster ISOs than 400, but you
    have to trade off graininess vs. exposure. I start with the above settings
    and bracket using my on-camera preview. That's what opening acts and
    eraseable memory is for. Unfortunately, digital is less forgiving than
    film.

    No matter what, turn that flash off! It's annoying to your fellow
    concert-goers. It annoys many performers. It may get you thrown out.

    A few other things come to mind: Don't shoot during the first one or two
    songs. Everyone, including you, is excited and jostling around. Give some
    time to calm down before you bring our your camera. Often, the best shots
    are taken between songs because the performers back away from the mike
    stands, and look up from their hands. They might even smile at each other
    and give a high-five. Don't blow all your film/memory early. The lights
    and pyrotechnics are often saved for the last song before the encore.
    Clothing may change for the encores, giving you a varied look.

    Last, remember the great photographer's rule: F8 and be there. As
    inspiration, here are some concert shots taken with a disposable camera. I
    didn't take these, I was at the back of the venue. I do think, however that
    the shooter used flash. But I really liked her use of lens flare, she knew
    when to push the shutter, and her composition is good. I'd like to give her
    a lesson in cropping, though.

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 2/FL000022.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 2/FL000020.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 4/FL000001.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v...Photos from Philadelphia/Album 3/FL000010.jpg

    Have fun!
    Dave
    Earguy
    EarGuy, Jun 11, 2006
    #12
  13. Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner

    EarGuy Guest

    "EarGuy" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Jeremiah DeWitt Weiner" <> wrote in message
    > news:e6c660$4em$...
    > > I'm curious what suggestions people have for shooting rock concerts
    > > at small venues.

    >
    > Not to sound like an old fogie, but I've been shooting concerts since the
    > 1970's (amature, audience - we don't need no stinkin' press passes!).


    Apologies for the multiple reply. Computer error. Couldn't have been me!

    Dave
    earguy
    EarGuy, Jun 11, 2006
    #13
  14. Hi EarGuy

    > Last, remember the great photographer's rule: F8 and be there.


    I love that rule !!! Deepest truth.

    Homage ...

    -- stan
    Stanley Krute, Jun 12, 2006
    #14
    1. Advertising

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