Rock Bands Sue Sony Music

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by GraB, May 6, 2006.

  1. GraB

    GraB Guest

    http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?id=54125&sort=0&sparte=4

    http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7

    Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
    Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
    downloaded legally over the Internet.

    According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
    downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
    triggering a different royalty deal.

    Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
    extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
    including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
    breakage.

    Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
    cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
    1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
    approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.
     
    GraB, May 6, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. GraB

    Blofelds Cat Guest

    "GraB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?id=54125&sort=0&sparte=4
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
    >
    > Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
    > Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
    > downloaded legally over the Internet.
    >
    > According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
    > downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
    > triggering a different royalty deal.
    >
    > Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
    > extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
    > including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
    > breakage.
    >
    > Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
    > cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
    > 1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
    > approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.


    Ah yes, the ongoing hypocrisy of the music industry - bleat like hell about
    how many trillions they are losing to file-sharing while at the same time
    ripping the artists off at every turn, despite already taking the lion's
    share of the profits.
     
    Blofelds Cat, May 6, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. GraB

    smithy Guest

    what an opportunity to start charing for torrent material at a rate of
    $2.00, 70% goes to artists, rest towards the network as a not for profit etc
    that would screw the record lables, the fans sell their artists music for
    them!


    "Blofelds Cat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "GraB" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?id=54125&sort=0&sparte=4
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
    >>
    >> Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
    >> Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
    >> downloaded legally over the Internet.
    >>
    >> According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
    >> downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
    >> triggering a different royalty deal.
    >>
    >> Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
    >> extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
    >> including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
    >> breakage.
    >>
    >> Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
    >> cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
    >> 1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
    >> approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.

    >
    > Ah yes, the ongoing hypocrisy of the music industry - bleat like hell
    > about how many trillions they are losing to file-sharing while at the same
    > time ripping the artists off at every turn, despite already taking the
    > lion's share of the profits.
    >
    >
    >
     
    smithy, May 6, 2006
    #3
  4. GraB

    jcash Guest

    if i remember correctly .....................the same ruse was employed by
    record companies at the time compact discs were introduced..............
    "GraB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?id=54125&sort=0&sparte=4
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
    >
    > Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
    > Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
    > downloaded legally over the Internet.
    >
    > According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
    > downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
    > triggering a different royalty deal.
    >
    > Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
    > extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
    > including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
    > breakage.
    >
    > Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
    > cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
    > 1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
    > approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.
     
    jcash, May 7, 2006
    #4
  5. GraB

    Jeßus Guest

    On Sun, 07 May 2006 05:08:22 +1200, GraB proclaimed:

    > http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?id=54125&sort=0&sparte=4
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
    >
    > Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony Music,
    > claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs downloaded
    > legally over the Internet.
    >
    > According to the suit, the record company is treating digital downloads
    > like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music, triggering a
    > different royalty deal.
    >
    > Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
    > extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
    > including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to breakage.
    >
    > Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
    > cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4 1/2
    > cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the approximately 30
    > cents they claim is rightfully theirs.


    Yeah, that'd be right. I wish any and all bands the best of luck and I
    hope they get to ream these so-called record companies like sony... these
    companies are the enemy of artists and consumers alike.



    --
    /J/
    Cut the crap to email me...
    Webcam: http://homepages.picknowl.com.au/glen1070/x.jpg
     
    Jeßus, May 7, 2006
    #5
  6. GraB

    Michael Guest

    "GraB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
    > Under that old rubrik,


    Sloppy journalism there. Associated Press need spell checkers. It's
    'rubric'.
     
    Michael, May 7, 2006
    #6
  7. GraB

    free2002 Guest

    ahh yeah i'm sure all those people who dloaded a copy of 'Don't Be Cruel' or
    'the Beat Police' would have gone out & bought the cd if it werent for the
    fact they could get it for free off the net ;/

    "GraB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?id=54125&sort=0&sparte=4
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
    >
    > Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
    > Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
    > downloaded legally over the Internet.
    >
    > According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
    > downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
    > triggering a different royalty deal.
    >
    > Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
    > extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
    > including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
    > breakage.
    >
    > Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
    > cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
    > 1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
    > approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.
     
    free2002, May 7, 2006
    #7
  8. GraB

    GraB Guest

    GraB, May 7, 2006
    #8
  9. GraB

    GraB Guest

    On Sat, 06 May 2006 21:13:02 GMT, "Blofelds Cat" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"GraB" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?id=54125&sort=0&sparte=4
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
    >>
    >> Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
    >> Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
    >> downloaded legally over the Internet.
    >>
    >> According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
    >> downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
    >> triggering a different royalty deal.
    >>
    >> Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
    >> extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
    >> including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
    >> breakage.
    >>
    >> Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
    >> cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
    >> 1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
    >> approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.

    >
    >Ah yes, the ongoing hypocrisy of the music industry - bleat like hell about
    >how many trillions they are losing to file-sharing while at the same time
    >ripping the artists off at every turn, despite already taking the lion's
    >share of the profits.
    >

    From http://daviswiki.org/MP3s :

    According to Moses Avalon's 1998 Book, Confessions of a Record
    Producer, the proceeds of a then-$17 CD would typically be distributed
    as follows: Retailer: $5 (29.4%), Record label: $4.92 (28.9%),
    Distributor: $2.40 (14.1%), Giveaways: $1.80 (10.6%),
    Duplication/recording: $1.10 (5.8%), Artist royalty: 83 cents (4.9%),
    Songwriter license: 60 cents (3.5%), Producer royalty: 27 cents
    (1.6%), Musicians union: 8 cents (0.4%). These figures show two
    things: How little is spent on production and the artist, and how much
    goes to the retailer and the record label. Yet $20 CDs - not just $17
    CDs - are commonplace now. Nevertheless, since the book was released,
    the cost of physical CD production has plummeted due to advances in CD
    mastering technology, as well as decreases in prices of the materials
    used in CDs themselves. Indeed, a common CD package may cost somewhere
    between six and 50 cents to produce, depending mostly on the amount
    and quality of liner-material.

    Notice what the artists get. This breakdown stinks to high heaven.
    If there is anyone robbing or hurting anyone, it is the record labels.

    There was a big Rap group that declared bankruptcy. Turned out they
    were getting 2% of the money from sales of their CDs.
     
    GraB, May 7, 2006
    #9
  10. GraB

    -=rjh=- Guest

    GraB wrote:

    >
    > Notice what the artists get. This breakdown stinks to high heaven.
    > If there is anyone robbing or hurting anyone, it is the record labels.


    Actually, it is probably much worse than the example you give.

    Steve Albini has something to say about all this, and he knows the business:

    http://www.negativland.com/albini.html

    "The Problem With Music
    by Steve Albini

    Whenever I talk to a band who are about to sign with a major label, I
    always end up thinking of them in a particular context. I imagine a
    trench, about four feet wide and five feet deep, maybe sixty yards long,
    filled with runny, decaying..."

    and the figures he gives at the end of the article are just amazing.


    Other links:

    http://blogcritics.org/archives/2003/06/10/155555.php

    Robert Fripp has had an ongoing problem with EMI/Virgin which he details
    in his diaries back in 2004, search in http://www.dgmlive.com/diaries.htm

    BTW Fripp has been recording soundtracks for Vista - remember that Eno
    did the Windows 95 startup sound?
     
    -=rjh=-, May 7, 2006
    #10
  11. GraB

    free2002 Guest

    interesting reading, was also wondering how succesful the Aussie itunes is &
    whether it has reduced peoples dloading. I for one have not used it partly
    because most legal dloads are encoded at 128 which is just yuk & also coz i
    buy 2nd hand cds of stuff i really want & encode them all at 256k. Theres
    heaps of stuff that i wouldn't dream of buying but dload coz i can get it
    for free eg. 90's stuff like Mc Hammer & Vanilla Ice (lol)


    "GraB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 7 May 2006 21:38:49 +1000, "free2002" <> wrote:
    >
    >>ahh yeah i'm sure all those people who dloaded a copy of 'Don't Be Cruel'
    >>or
    >>'the Beat Police' would have gone out & bought the cd if it werent for the
    >>fact they could get it for free off the net ;/
    >>

    > http://www.unc.edu/~cigar/papers/FileSharing_March2004.pdf
    >
    > http://www.openp2p.com/pub/a/p2p/2003/07/22/p2p_debate.html
    >
    > One could write a book on how the music suits are claiming losses that
    > they can't prove they are actually losing.
     
    free2002, May 8, 2006
    #11
  12. GraB

    Bette Noir Guest

    On , , Mon, 08 May 2006 09:45:12 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony
    Music, -=rjh=- <> wrote:

    >GraB wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Notice what the artists get. This breakdown stinks to high heaven.
    >> If there is anyone robbing or hurting anyone, it is the record labels.

    >
    >Actually, it is probably much worse than the example you give.
    >
    >Steve Albini has something to say about all this, and he knows the business:
    >
    >http://www.negativland.com/albini.html
    >
    >"The Problem With Music
    >by Steve Albini
    >
    >Whenever I talk to a band who are about to sign with a major label, I
    >always end up thinking of them in a particular context. I imagine a
    >trench, about four feet wide and five feet deep, maybe sixty yards long,
    >filled with runny, decaying..."
    >
    >and the figures he gives at the end of the article are just amazing.


    Well why don't the band members have a whip around and use that
    to produce the CD's, covers, international promotion and freight?
    Shouldn't cost them much more than a few million.
    Record labels get a very bad press, they do take a risk in
    investing money into bands and recordings, for every sucessfull
    group there are probably another 4 that don't make their money
    back. They have to recoup their money somehow.

    ---
     
    Bette Noir, May 8, 2006
    #12
  13. On Tue, 09 May 2006 08:03:50 +1200, someone purporting to be Bette Noir
    didst scrawl:

    > On , , Mon, 08 May 2006 09:45:12 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony
    > Music, -=rjh=- <> wrote:
    >

    *SNIP*
    > Well why don't the band members have a whip around and use that
    > to produce the CD's, covers, international promotion and freight?
    > Shouldn't cost them much more than a few million.
    > Record labels get a very bad press, they do take a risk in
    > investing money into bands and recordings, for every sucessfull
    > group there are probably another 4 that don't make their money
    > back. They have to recoup their money somehow.
    >

    How is it that the book publishing industry doesn't hold their writers
    responsible for every last cost if a book doesn't make it? They say "Oh
    well, it happens," and look for another book to publish. Quite reasonably
    they subtract advances from sales, but they are the ones who wear all the
    costs of publication instead of putting them on an account that the writer
    must pay back.

    The record labels get bad press because they deserve it.
    Take a look at http://www.markrubin.com/sxsw/albini.html. Steve Albini
    ought to know, if anyone does, what the music industry is like.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
     
    Matthew Poole, May 8, 2006
    #13
  14. GraB

    Nik Coughlin Guest

    Matthew Poole wrote:
    > On Tue, 09 May 2006 08:03:50 +1200, someone purporting to be Bette
    > Noir didst scrawl:
    >
    >> On , , Mon, 08 May 2006 09:45:12 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony
    >> Music, -=rjh=- <> wrote:
    >>

    > *SNIP*
    >> Well why don't the band members have a whip around and use that
    >> to produce the CD's, covers, international promotion and freight?
    >> Shouldn't cost them much more than a few million.
    >> Record labels get a very bad press, they do take a risk in
    >> investing money into bands and recordings, for every sucessfull
    >> group there are probably another 4 that don't make their money
    >> back. They have to recoup their money somehow.

    >
    > The record labels get bad press because they deserve it.
    > Take a look at http://www.markrubin.com/sxsw/albini.html. Steve Albini
    > ought to know, if anyone does, what the music industry is like.


    The last part of the page is the most telling:

    The Balance Sheet:
    This is how much each player got paid at the end of the game.
    Record company: $710,000
    Producer: $90,000
    Manager: $51,000
    Studio: $52,500
    Previous label: $50,000
    Agent: $7,500
    Lawyer: $12,000
    Band member net income each: $4,031.25
     
    Nik Coughlin, May 8, 2006
    #14
  15. On Tue, 09 May 2006 08:03:50 +1200, Bette Noir wrote:

    > On , , Mon, 08 May 2006 09:45:12 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony
    > Music, -=rjh=- <> wrote:

    [snip]

    >>Actually, it is probably much worse than the example you give.
    >>
    >>Steve Albini has something to say about all this, and he knows the business:
    >>
    >>http://www.negativland.com/albini.html
    >>
    >>"The Problem With Music
    >>by Steve Albini
    >>
    >>Whenever I talk to a band who are about to sign with a major label, I
    >>always end up thinking of them in a particular context. I imagine a
    >>trench, about four feet wide and five feet deep, maybe sixty yards long,
    >>filled with runny, decaying..."
    >>
    >>and the figures he gives at the end of the article are just amazing.

    >
    > Well why don't the band members have a whip around and use that
    > to produce the CD's, covers, international promotion and freight?
    > Shouldn't cost them much more than a few million.
    > Record labels get a very bad press, they do take a risk in
    > investing money into bands and recordings, for every sucessfull
    > group there are probably another 4 that don't make their money
    > back. They have to recoup their money somehow.


    FFS did you even read what Albini wrote? You're basically saying the only
    way record companies can make money is be defrauding bands.

    --
    You can't stop the signal
     
    Ian Galbraith, May 8, 2006
    #15
  16. GraB

    Bette Noir Guest

    On , , Tue, 09 May 2006 08:12:17 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony
    Music, Matthew Poole <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 09 May 2006 08:03:50 +1200, someone purporting to be Bette Noir
    >didst scrawl:
    >
    >> On , , Mon, 08 May 2006 09:45:12 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony
    >> Music, -=rjh=- <> wrote:
    >>

    >*SNIP*
    >> Well why don't the band members have a whip around and use that
    >> to produce the CD's, covers, international promotion and freight?
    >> Shouldn't cost them much more than a few million.
    >> Record labels get a very bad press, they do take a risk in
    >> investing money into bands and recordings, for every sucessfull
    >> group there are probably another 4 that don't make their money
    >> back. They have to recoup their money somehow.
    >>

    >How is it that the book publishing industry doesn't hold their writers
    >responsible for every last cost if a book doesn't make it? They say "Oh
    >well, it happens," and look for another book to publish. Quite reasonably
    >they subtract advances from sales, but they are the ones who wear all the
    >costs of publication instead of putting them on an account that the writer
    >must pay back.


    I have no knowledge of the book publishing industry. I was
    talking about the record industry.
    It is a gamble on the part of the music publishers which is what
    I was saying.

    ---
     
    Bette Noir, May 9, 2006
    #16
  17. GraB

    Jeßus Guest

    On Tue, 09 May 2006 14:30:30 +1200, Bette Noir proclaimed:

    > On , , Tue, 09 May 2006 08:12:17 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony Music,
    > Matthew Poole <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 09 May 2006 08:03:50 +1200, someone purporting to be Bette Noir
    >>didst scrawl:
    >>
    >>> On , , Mon, 08 May 2006 09:45:12 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony >>

    > Music, -=rjh=- <> wrote: >>
    >>*SNIP*
    >>> Well why don't the band members have a whip around and use that >> to

    > produce the CD's, covers, international promotion and freight? >>
    > Shouldn't cost them much more than a few million. >> Record labels get a
    > very bad press, they do take a risk in >> investing money into bands and
    > recordings, for every sucessfull >> group there are probably another 4
    > that don't make their money >> back. They have to recoup their money
    > somehow. >>
    >>How is it that the book publishing industry doesn't hold their writers
    >>responsible for every last cost if a book doesn't make it? They say "Oh
    >>well, it happens," and look for another book to publish. Quite reasonably
    >>they subtract advances from sales, but they are the ones who wear all the
    >>costs of publication instead of putting them on an account that the

    > writer >must pay back.
    >
    > I have no knowledge of the book publishing industry. I was talking about
    > the record industry.
    > It is a gamble on the part of the music publishers which is what I was
    > saying.


    The same argument can be made for a wide range of enterprises... from drug
    dealing to playing the money market. Either way, it is an argument that is
    not the slightest bit relevant to the discussion. Millions of
    people/companies take the same risks, and yet they seem able to
    resist abusing/exploiting their position in the same way that the major
    labels do.


    --
    /J/
    Cut the crap to email me...
    Webcam: http://homepages.picknowl.com.au/glen1070/x.jpg
     
    Jeßus, May 9, 2006
    #17
  18. GraB

    Bette Noir Guest

    On , , Tue, 9 May 2006 08:38:52 +1000, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony
    Music, Ian Galbraith <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 09 May 2006 08:03:50 +1200, Bette Noir wrote:
    >
    >> On , , Mon, 08 May 2006 09:45:12 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony
    >> Music, -=rjh=- <> wrote:

    >[snip]
    >
    >>>Actually, it is probably much worse than the example you give.
    >>>
    >>>Steve Albini has something to say about all this, and he knows the business:
    >>>
    >>>http://www.negativland.com/albini.html
    >>>
    >>>"The Problem With Music
    >>>by Steve Albini
    >>>
    >>>Whenever I talk to a band who are about to sign with a major label, I
    >>>always end up thinking of them in a particular context. I imagine a
    >>>trench, about four feet wide and five feet deep, maybe sixty yards long,
    >>>filled with runny, decaying..."
    >>>
    >>>and the figures he gives at the end of the article are just amazing.

    >>
    >> Well why don't the band members have a whip around and use that
    >> to produce the CD's, covers, international promotion and freight?
    >> Shouldn't cost them much more than a few million.
    >> Record labels get a very bad press, they do take a risk in
    >> investing money into bands and recordings, for every sucessfull
    >> group there are probably another 4 that don't make their money
    >> back. They have to recoup their money somehow.

    >
    >FFS did you even read what Albini wrote?


    I don't happen to agree with his conclusions.

    >You're basically saying the only
    >way record companies can make money is be defrauding bands.


    I said no such thing. Record companies are not defrauding bands.
    ---
     
    Bette Noir, May 10, 2006
    #18
  19. On Thu, 11 May 2006 01:16:36 +1200, Bette Noir wrote:

    > On , , Tue, 9 May 2006 08:38:52 +1000, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony
    > Music, Ian Galbraith <> wrote:

    [snip]

    >>FFS did you even read what Albini wrote?


    > I don't happen to agree with his conclusions.


    >>You're basically saying the only
    >>way record companies can make money is be defrauding bands.


    > I said no such thing. Record companies are not defrauding bands.


    Its not a matter of agreeing with his conclusions, unless he is lying he
    is presenting facts and those facts amount to fraud.

    --
    You can't stop the signal
     
    Ian Galbraith, May 10, 2006
    #19
  20. GraB

    Bette Noir Guest

    On , , Tue, 09 May 2006 13:18:46 +1000, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony
    Music, Jeßus <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 09 May 2006 14:30:30 +1200, Bette Noir proclaimed:
    >
    >> On , , Tue, 09 May 2006 08:12:17 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony Music,
    >> Matthew Poole <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 09 May 2006 08:03:50 +1200, someone purporting to be Bette Noir
    >>>didst scrawl:
    >>>
    >>>> On , , Mon, 08 May 2006 09:45:12 +1200, Re: Rock Bands Sue Sony >>

    >> Music, -=rjh=- <> wrote: >>
    >>>*SNIP*
    >>>> Well why don't the band members have a whip around and use that >> to

    >> produce the CD's, covers, international promotion and freight? >>
    >> Shouldn't cost them much more than a few million. >> Record labels get a
    >> very bad press, they do take a risk in >> investing money into bands and
    >> recordings, for every sucessfull >> group there are probably another 4
    >> that don't make their money >> back. They have to recoup their money
    >> somehow. >>
    >>>How is it that the book publishing industry doesn't hold their writers
    >>>responsible for every last cost if a book doesn't make it? They say "Oh
    >>>well, it happens," and look for another book to publish. Quite reasonably
    >>>they subtract advances from sales, but they are the ones who wear all the
    >>>costs of publication instead of putting them on an account that the

    >> writer >must pay back.
    >>
    >> I have no knowledge of the book publishing industry. I was talking about
    >> the record industry.
    >> It is a gamble on the part of the music publishers which is what I was
    >> saying.

    >
    >The same argument can be made for a wide range of enterprises... from drug
    >dealing to playing the money market. Either way, it is an argument that is
    >not the slightest bit relevant to the discussion. Millions of
    >people/companies take the same risks, and yet they seem able to
    >resist abusing/exploiting their position in the same way that the major
    >labels do.


    Well as I said a few posts ago let the band members have a whip
    around for the few million or so and do their own production,
    advertising and distribution. It should be a doddle if there is
    so much profit to be made.

    ---
     
    Bette Noir, May 11, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. PR
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    409
    Jonathan Wilson
    Jul 11, 2004
  2. gman

    advise on minicam to record bands

    gman, Aug 4, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    358
    Frank ess
    Aug 5, 2004
  3. Jeff M
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    626
  4. Jeff M
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    476
    greensteak
    Nov 9, 2004
  5. iL_weReo

    There is no more rock music

    iL_weReo, Dec 23, 2008, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    430
    iL_weReo
    Dec 23, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page