REVIEW: Raynox Polarising Filter

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Alex Butcher, Aug 20, 2004.

  1. Alex Butcher

    Alex Butcher Guest

    Hi -

    I've just recently picked up a Raynox polarising filter (together with
    45->52mm adaptor and multi-coated lens protector) from Jessops. Now, I'm
    sure the pros will recommend other (costlier!) polarisers (and they're
    probably worth it), but I have to say that I'm very impressed for the
    price of the Raynox (35GBP all-in for the Olympus C-7xx series).

    There's not really much to say about it, except that it works exactly as
    described; greatly reducing reflections from shiny surfaces (e.g. glass,
    water, leaves, car bodywork) and reducing atmospheric haze giving bluer
    skies and more distinct clouds (on a bright, clear day, anyway).

    I'd heartily recommend a polarising filter to anyone who's taking photos
    including the subjects I've mentioned.

    A tip for anyone whose camera includes a histogram is to leave it on and
    turn the polariser ring until the graph stops moving leftwards and
    reverses direction. Turn the polariser back the other way slightly and
    you'll have found the maximum effect position.

    One downside is that it is slightly easier to get lens flares, that's a
    hazard (to a greater or lesser extent) with all add-on lenses. Careful
    positioning will prevent it, though.

    Raynox produce x->52mm adaptors for many current digicams and Jessops can
    order similar bundles to the one I bought. The URL for Raynox's website is
    <http://www.raynox.co.jp>.

    Best Regards,
    Alex.
    --
    Alex Butcher Brainbench MVP for Internet Security: www.brainbench.com
    Bristol, UK Need reliable and secure network systems?
    PGP/GnuPG ID:0x271fd950 <http://www.assursys.com/>
     
    Alex Butcher, Aug 20, 2004
    #1
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  2. Alex Butcher

    G. Innipig Guest

    "Alex Butcher" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Hi -
    >
    > I've just recently picked up a Raynox polarising filter


    > There's not really much to say about it,


    One wonders why you managed to say so much then, really.
     
    G. Innipig, Aug 20, 2004
    #2
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  3. Alex Butcher

    Bob Salomon Guest

    In article <>,
    Alex Butcher <> wrote:

    > One downside is that it is slightly easier to get lens flares, that's a
    > hazard (to a greater or lesser extent) with all add-on lenses. Careful
    > positioning will prevent it, though.


    That is easily controlled by using a multi-coated (on both sides) filter
    and a lens hood. Uncoated filters or those with coatings on one side
    only are prone to flare as are all uncoated glass to air surfaces.

    --
    To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
     
    Bob Salomon, Aug 20, 2004
    #3
  4. Alex Butcher

    Alex Butcher Guest

    On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 20:27:24 +0100, G. Innipig wrote:

    >
    > "Alex Butcher" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> Hi -
    >>
    >> I've just recently picked up a Raynox polarising filter

    >
    >> There's not really much to say about it,

    >
    > One wonders why you managed to say so much then, really.


    Someone trying to contribute something useful? Can't be having that now,
    can we.

    *plonk*

    Alex.
    --
    Alex Butcher Brainbench MVP for Internet Security: www.brainbench.com
    Bristol, UK Need reliable and secure network systems?
    PGP/GnuPG ID:0x271fd950 <http://www.assursys.com/>
     
    Alex Butcher, Aug 20, 2004
    #4
  5. [Alex Butcher wrote in uk.rec.photo.misc]
    > One downside is that it is slightly easier to get lens flares, that's a
    > hazard (to a greater or lesser extent) with all add-on lenses. Careful
    > positioning will prevent it, though.


    A lens hood is a good idea to anyone shooting outdoors, even without a
    lens attachment. It helps to cut down on all lens flares.

    Also handy for cutting down on reflections when shooting through glass
    (yuck). Technique is to position the camera so that the hood and the
    glass are touching.



    --
    Regards, Andy Davidson
    http://www.fotoserve.com/ - Better quality printing for your digital photos.
     
    Andy Davidson, Aug 21, 2004
    #5
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