Resizing photo question?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Steven Wandy, Nov 8, 2005.

  1. Steven Wandy

    Steven Wandy Guest

    My daughter just got married this past weekend and I am making up a CDR for
    some friends and relatives of some of the pictures that I took.
    I wish to have the files resized so that they can go to Costco/Walmart/etc.
    and make 4x6 prints without any hassles.
    When I make my own prints, I use PSCS2 and crop the images to 4x6 but then
    print them myself by either telling PS to resize the image in the printer
    driver or use Qimage.
    (1) I am not sure if my cropping to 4x6 is what Walmart, etc. would need or
    do I have to resize the images also?
    (2) If I should resize them, to what DPI for these types of services?
    Thanks for any help,
    Steve
    Steven Wandy, Nov 8, 2005
    #1
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  2. Steven Wandy

    Guest

    It would be helpful to know what aspect ratio your camera uses. Mine
    takes pictures at 3:2, which is exactly of course in the ratio of 4:6
    and therefore there would be no benefit to resizing. Sounds like your
    camera might use 4:3, just like American TV or non-wide-screen computer
    monitor.

    I have had my photos printed usually 7" x 5", without resizing them
    myself, with NEVER any problem. I'm sure I just lose a little bit of
    both ends of the picture. I.e., you don't have to do anything unless
    you are real picky. Most photos have lots of border that they can
    afford to lose without impacting the picture much. At least, that's my
    own experience.
    , Nov 8, 2005
    #2
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  3. Steven Wandy

    Jim Townsend Guest

    Steven Wandy wrote:

    > My daughter just got married this past weekend and I am making up a CDR for
    > some friends and relatives of some of the pictures that I took.
    > I wish to have the files resized so that they can go to Costco/Walmart/etc.
    > and make 4x6 prints without any hassles.
    > When I make my own prints, I use PSCS2 and crop the images to 4x6 but then
    > print them myself by either telling PS to resize the image in the printer
    > driver or use Qimage.
    > (1) I am not sure if my cropping to 4x6 is what Walmart, etc. would need or
    > do I have to resize the images also?



    If your images are 4:3, YOU should crop them to 3:2. (4x6). If you don't,
    then WalMart will have to and they may not crop them the way you want.
    You could get cut off heads.

    > (2) If I should resize them, to what DPI for these types of services?
    > Thanks for any help,


    Just ignore the DPI setting and make sure the [resample image] box
    is unchecked when you process the image. All you need to worry about
    are pixels.

    The DPI is the number of pixels divided by the inches they're printed
    on..

    The general consensus is that 300 DPI provides the best printing results,
    anything more is overkill.. So:

    6 inches X 300 DPI = 1800 pixels
    4 inches x 300 DPI = 1200 pixels

    Your final image should be at least 1800 x 1200 pixels.. That's
    all you have to worry about.

    This will give you 300 DPI in each direction. Of course the images
    CAN be larger.. If they are larger than 1800x1200, just leave them that
    way.. WalMart can downsize them if they are too big for their purposes.
    Jim Townsend, Nov 8, 2005
    #3
  4. Steven Wandy

    Bob Williams Guest

    Steven Wandy wrote:
    > My daughter just got married this past weekend and I am making up a CDR for
    > some friends and relatives of some of the pictures that I took.
    > I wish to have the files resized so that they can go to Costco/Walmart/etc.
    > and make 4x6 prints without any hassles.
    > When I make my own prints, I use PSCS2 and crop the images to 4x6 but then
    > print them myself by either telling PS to resize the image in the printer
    > driver or use Qimage.
    > (1) I am not sure if my cropping to 4x6 is what Walmart, etc. would need or
    > do I have to resize the images also?
    > (2) If I should resize them, to what DPI for these types of services?
    > Thanks for any help,
    > Steve
    >
    >


    In PSCS2, open the crop tool and set the dimensions to 4"x6" and set the
    resolution to 300 ppi.
    When you crop the picture the way you like it, it will automatically be
    cropped to 4x6 and will be resampled to 300 ppi, all in one fell swoop.
    Edit as desired and burn the images to a CD.
    This is exactly the size and resolution that WalMart/Costco likes to
    have for their 18 cent prints.
    I had the same experience two months ago.
    I sent CDs full of images (4x6 @ 300ppi) to select guests so they could
    just take the CD to Costco and have prints made of the images they desired.
    Bob Williams
    Bob Williams, Nov 8, 2005
    #4
  5. Steven Wandy

    kctan Guest

    When creating a digital image, input resolution and output resolution are
    involved. Input resolution means the amount of pixels you want to create for
    an image and generally that is by digital camera or scanner. Output
    resolution also means the amount of pixels you want to print or display and
    generally that is by printer or monitor. We are concerned on the image
    quality and size now. The question is the size of the pixel must be small
    enough not to be detected by naked eyes (affects image quality with no file
    compression). But this pixel size will affect the image or picture's
    dimensions (image size). Small pixel size get smaller image size and vice
    versa . But amount of pixels within that image also affect its image's
    dimensions. More amount of pixels means larger image size and vice versa. So
    now 2 factors affecting the image's dimensions. Therefore 3 factors
    interacting to affect the image size and physical quality.(note: file
    compression is another issue that affects image quality).

    Summary:
    1. Physical image quality is decided by the size of 1 pixel and measured in
    pixel per inch or PPI but misrepresented by DPI. (DPI 72 means per pixel =
    1/72")
    2. Image size (W x H) is decided by the amount of pixels and per pixel size
    (PPI or DPI) within that image.
    3. Image width = Amount of pixels on the width/PPI and Image height = Amount
    of pixels on the height/PPI.

    Example:
    Input resolution of an image by digital camera is 1600 x 1200 pixels.
    Apply PPI or DPI 200 = 1600/200 = 8" and 1200/200 = 6" = 6 x 8" print
    Apply PPI or DPI 300 = 1600/300 = 5.33" and 1200/300 = 4" = 4 x 5.3" print.

    So what is the answer to your question? What DPI? (PPI to be precise but
    since people misrepresent it, just play the tune along).
    Answer: It is the machine output DPI ( this is correct and not PPI) and the
    printing technology that matter. Machines print differently or different
    technology. Inkjet generally needs 1/3 PPI of its output DPI. Offset needs
    1.5 to 2 times its DPI or LPI to be precise...etc. So ask your lab
    personnel or set at 250 PPI is a safe guide line (so far no photo's machine
    needs more than PPI 300). Usually you don't need to border about all this as
    the lab got software to set for the best quality output automatically (still
    it is better to confirm with them).

    Hope I'm not too long winded.

    http://web.singnet.com.sg/~kcpps


    "Steven Wandy" <> wrote in message
    news:lASbf.14859$...
    > My daughter just got married this past weekend and I am making up a CDR
    > for some friends and relatives of some of the pictures that I took.
    > I wish to have the files resized so that they can go to
    > Costco/Walmart/etc. and make 4x6 prints without any hassles.
    > When I make my own prints, I use PSCS2 and crop the images to 4x6 but then
    > print them myself by either telling PS to resize the image in the printer
    > driver or use Qimage.
    > (1) I am not sure if my cropping to 4x6 is what Walmart, etc. would need
    > or do I have to resize the images also?
    > (2) If I should resize them, to what DPI for these types of services?
    > Thanks for any help,
    > Steve
    >
    kctan, Nov 8, 2005
    #5
  6. Steven Wandy

    Jeremy Guest

    "Steven Wandy" <> wrote in message
    news:lASbf.14859$...
    > My daughter just got married this past weekend and I am making up a CDR
    > for some friends and relatives of some of the pictures that I took.
    > I wish to have the files resized so that they can go to
    > Costco/Walmart/etc. and make 4x6 prints without any hassles.
    > When I make my own prints, I use PSCS2 and crop the images to 4x6 but then
    > print them myself by either telling PS to resize the image in the printer
    > driver or use Qimage.
    > (1) I am not sure if my cropping to 4x6 is what Walmart, etc. would need
    > or do I have to resize the images also?
    > (2) If I should resize them, to what DPI for these types of services?
    > Thanks for any help,
    > Steve
    >


    To get a 300 ppi image at 4x6 inches you should crop the image to 1200 x
    1800.

    Suggestion: Open an account at Kodak Gallery (formerly Ofoto.com) and upload
    the photos there. Give the address to your friends and relatives and they
    can just order them online, without having to worry if they will print
    correctly (you will have checked all that when you uploaded them). You can
    also give them CDs.

    By uploading them to a printing service you can check everything out in
    advance, and you will know that they'll get the prints as you intended.
    Also they will be made on silver halide paper, using photo dyes--not inkjet
    prints. If they want to make their own prints instead, they can just print
    from your CD.
    Jeremy, Nov 8, 2005
    #6
  7. Steven Wandy

    Rod Williams Guest


    > The DPI is the number of pixels divided by the inches they're printed
    > on..
    >
    > The general consensus is that 300 DPI provides the best printing results,
    > anything more is overkill.. So:
    >
    > 6 inches X 300 DPI = 1800 pixels
    > 4 inches x 300 DPI = 1200 pixels
    >
    > Your final image should be at least 1800 x 1200 pixels.. That's
    > all you have to worry about.
    >
    > This will give you 300 DPI in each direction. Of course the images
    > CAN be larger.. If they are larger than 1800x1200, just leave them that
    > way.. WalMart can downsize them if they are too big for their purposes.
    >
    >
    >

    This is exactly what I do too. I would rather let Photoshop resize and
    send the correct size to be printed. On the other hand if you are giving
    someone a disc of pictures and don't know what size they want it might
    be better to just give them the full size image and trust that the
    downsize process will be as good as what Photoshop would have done.

    6" X 300 PPI = 1800 4" X 300 = 1200

    7" X 300 PPI = 2100 5" X 300 = 1500

    and so on.

    I like to talk in terms of PPI (pixels per inch) instead of DPI (dots
    per inch) It can get confusing, especially when talking dots per inch in
    a ink printer. It takes several dots of ink to make one pixel.
    Rod Williams, Nov 11, 2005
    #7
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