Request for advice for career in Cisco

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Daniel S, Dec 19, 2007.

  1. Daniel S

    Daniel S Guest

    I've been in the workforce for about 1.5 years, and, if anything, I
    have learned that employers [who actually spend money to have a
    certain person working for them] care not so much about all the nifty
    little tricks one's picked up over time, but what the employee can do
    for the position that they were hired for.

    In terms of what's available, there is first, the smaller company
    niche where a single employee usually takes care of the entire grunt
    of the IT work, and therefore has ~50-70% the knowledge of a
    specialized employee in a particular subject, BUT has to juggle/google
    a great many such subjects at once. To be honest that is pretty darn
    hard to do 'cause 10*50 = 500 while 90+40+30+30 = 190. My brother's
    in actually in such a position and it's a pretty "home-y" one to be
    in. However in terms of employment there isn't much turnaround, and
    if there IS, the new employee will most of the time walk into a
    warzone left behind by the previous occupant, so he has to have a
    really strong skillset in order to get on top of things right away.
    I'm just nowhere capable enough right now to shoot for something like
    that.

    In terms of specialization - I would like to work toward a career in
    Cisco Networking. Even pulling whatever "jack-of-all trades, master
    of none" job contracts I can find in the meantime, I believe that in
    about a year's time I can get a very good grasp of the material in
    CCNP, CCSP, CCDP and maybe dabble in CCVP - and pass the exams as well
    - not planning on having a life for the time being, cause I really
    wanna get this going :p

    My question is: in order to find a job applying the skills gained from
    those certifications what OTHER skills will be MOST necessary for me
    to get. I need to focus, and thought it'd be nice to know a whole lot
    of everything I need to be selective of what I spend my time
    learning.

    Just some rambling to let you know where I'm coming from.

    [[[

    I've dabbled in Microsoft networking a bit (I've learned [and built]
    forests, did a bit of Active Directory/Exchange/DNS/miscellaneous
    Microsoft server setups) and I plan on refreshing my memory relating
    to that since a) the foundation is already there and shouldn't require
    THAT much effort b) there's a lot of rudimentary material that is
    almost mandatory knowledge. [besides that foundation I don't know how
    much other Microsoft stuff a Cisco technician will encounter].

    Unix/Linux is awesome, but I've spend my early years playing Doom, not
    chilling in X-Windows. Yes, that is on my todo list, but because it
    is so foreign to me, I hope to not have to make a priority of it, so I
    hope it's not necessary for Cisco work.

    Do most Cisco personell work for telcoms? I'm very unversed in that
    universe, and I have the feeling that's the single biggest avocation I
    should pick up.

    ]]]


    the question therefore is: what else, in order of priority, must I
    learn in order to land an entry level Cisco job [probably having CCNP
    level cert, by the time I start looking, and studying for the other
    ones while I'm on the job]

    [i've posted this is a Cisco specialized group with smaller activity,
    but I've just had too many pleasantly unexpected surprises to pass up
    the chance to post here as well]
    I know I wrote a bit ... ty so much for your reading this and for the
    responses
    Daniel S, Dec 19, 2007
    #1
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  2. Daniel S

    meerkat Guest

    "Daniel S" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I've been in the workforce for about 1.5 years, and, if anything, I
    > have learned that employers [who actually spend money to have a
    > certain person working for them] care not so much about all the nifty
    > little tricks one's picked up over time, but what the employee can do
    > for the position that they were hired for.
    >

    snipped for speed.

    Hi Dan. why don`t you use google as a free aid to get info ?.
    www.google.com

    http://www.ciscolearning.org/
    Is one example only, but there`s lots out there.
    meerkat, Dec 19, 2007
    #2
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  3. Daniel S

    Daniel S Guest

    What's a bit tough is that a good search will many times first return
    questions about the Cisco material itself - and that doesn't really
    concern me that much, because if it's in the books I'll learn it ...
    period. And that's actually the best type of search return that falls
    below the mark - it all goes downhill from there.

    So yeah, I definitely will use other sources (ex. resume sites), but
    the personalized responses of usenet groups have helped me greatly in
    the past.

    I'm hoping there might be someone who has worked on this, and would
    like to discuss it - maybe getting some self-gratification from the
    reflection of fond memories :).

    Thanks
    Daniel S, Dec 19, 2007
    #3
  4. Daniel S

    why? Guest

    On Wed, 19 Dec 2007 08:40:39 -0800 (PST), Daniel S wrote:

    <snip, some extra bits not needed>

    >In terms of specialization - I would like to work toward a career in
    >Cisco Networking. Even pulling whatever "jack-of-all trades, master


    <snip the stuff you want to do>

    >My question is: in order to find a job applying the skills gained from
    >those certifications what OTHER skills will be MOST necessary for me
    >to get. I need to focus, and thought it'd be nice to know a whole lot


    <snip rambling, not required>

    >I've dabbled in Microsoft networking a bit (I've learned [and built]
    >forests, did a bit of Active Directory/Exchange/DNS/miscellaneous
    >Microsoft server setups) and I plan on refreshing my memory relating


    All of the above, or at least knowing high WAN traffic is caused by
    incorrect AD configuration.

    <snip more not needed>

    >Unix/Linux is awesome, but I've spend my early years playing Doom, not


    Other skills, depends ón what you are aiming for the small company multi
    skilled (networking , av , firewall, ISDN/T1 / routing , domain,
    windows, unix, applications, dns, email and so on)

    or just the networking job in a larger company, lets see.....

    Routing , switching , vlans, WAN, protocols, packet tracing, dns ,
    security, firewall ,
    tacacs, syslog, ntp (the stuff for logging that runs on Win / unix
    servers) . The sort of stuff you see an course content for Cisco and job
    ads.

    <ditto>

    <more snip>

    Me
    why?, Dec 19, 2007
    #4
  5. Daniel S

    why? Guest

    On Wed, 19 Dec 2007 09:17:56 -0800 (PST), Daniel S wrote:

    <snip>

    >I'm hoping there might be someone who has worked on this, and would
    >like to discuss it - maybe getting some self-gratification from the
    >reflection of fond memories :).


    Never been on a Cisco course, 2950's etc easy enough. 6509's I didn't do
    much with. The new 6504's did most of the setup, along with all the 60+
    3560's/2960's, only recent problem was a PIX515E NATting and proxy arp.

    Got the books, did some online courses but best place is www.cisco.com
    and all the examples and docs.

    Get some kit in, I don't have enough stuff at home yet, only a PIX510,
    2651 router and 2950 switch. However at work are the spares of the brand
    new kit so that's handy.

    The Cisco ng's will help there, in fact most likely check out all the
    past kit threads first.

    Me
    why?, Dec 19, 2007
    #5
  6. Daniel S

    Daniel S Guest

    Thanks for the reply

    "2950's etc easy enough. 6509's I didn't do
    much with. The new 6504's did most of the setup, along with all the
    60+
    3560's/2960's, only recent problem was a PIX515E NATting and proxy
    arp"

    It sounds like you've done quite a bit of Cisco work. Are you part of
    a larger company where a large percentage of your workload has to do
    with Cisco products, or a smaller company where your tasks are much
    more diverse?
    Daniel S, Dec 19, 2007
    #6
  7. Daniel S

    why? Guest

    On Wed, 19 Dec 2007 11:28:50 -0800 (PST), Daniel S wrote:

    >Thanks for the reply
    >
    >"2950's etc easy enough. 6509's I didn't do
    >much with. The new 6504's did most of the setup, along with all the
    >60+
    >3560's/2960's, only recent problem was a PIX515E NATting and proxy
    >arp"
    >
    >It sounds like you've done quite a bit of Cisco work. Are you part of


    Joint effort 1 building, 30+ 2950s/couple of 6509s was 6 years or so
    ago.

    May/June this year was the 60+ kit bits, replaced all hardware across a
    large factory / office setup. (for 1500+ connected items).

    Previous was DEC/Cabletron kit on 800+ user site.

    >a larger company where a large percentage of your workload has to do


    Large company, this time. Part of the global desktop group doing
    networks (LANs mostly) , there is a global network services group who
    mainly do the WAN / routing stuff up to the customer site.

    However having worked in desktop doing PCs, then Win servers , ditto for
    Unix I tend to support the IT people rather than users.

    Getting into PIX firewall just now as we may have more internal DMZs
    last one was kit customer wanted to control with no input from us. Hence
    the FW protection. Oh forgot to mention we also have a lot of test kit
    doing lots of broadcast / multicasts which can really screw a LAN. So
    the other thing we have done is either 2811 router/2950 switch pair or a
    3560 switch (that does routing) to create local lab VLANs. Although the
    site routers 6509/6504 would cope if this traffic hit them. I prefer not
    to run that data over any LAN backbone link or to a switch in the edge
    stack (where everyone else is connected) . So the local router keeps
    anythng unwanted local to the lab.

    >with Cisco products, or a smaller company where your tasks are much
    >more diverse?


    Have worked in small a few small places and was more diverse, lots more
    customer application support in those cases. However the systems were
    small businesses 2-3 up to big bank branches. Those (1991-1993) days it
    was DOS/Win311, Xenix, Multiuser CDOS with Wyse terminals, multiuser
    apps. Even some programming 4GLs, scripting batch files, stock,
    delivery, training, remote access, atari ST PCs, amstrad 20286 (MFM
    hardisks) and Atari PCs (pre 1991) with GEM and tiny hardisks, when you
    had to partition as C and D to use all the available space, mono EGA
    displays. Oh and not forgetting Pagemaker with Windows 2.x runtime.

    Me
    why?, Dec 19, 2007
    #7
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