Repost: non-admins can't add new wireless connections

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Don Wilkinson, Apr 21, 2006.

  1. I feel like I should already know this stuff, being an IT guy for 15 years
    and all, but, somehow, I've mostly managed to avoid learning about
    wireless... until now. :)

    So, the office is a Windows shop with a bunch of WAPs on the same SSID using
    WEP (yeah, it's weak, I know). When setting up a laptop for a Domain user I
    log in as admin, set it up, log out and hand over the laptop. When they go
    home and try to use the home network wireless, they are, reportedly, unable
    to set things up - as in, can't enter WEP keys and such. They get errors
    about not having access to change settings. User's domain account is a
    member of the local Power Users group. SOUNDS like they need to have
    administrator level permission on the system. Is this right?

    Please tell me I don't have to give them admin privs for them to be able to
    use their laptop at Starbuck or at the client site. I mean really....

    Thanks in advance,
    Don
     
    Don Wilkinson, Apr 21, 2006
    #1
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  2. Don Wilkinson

    Jack Guest

    Hi
    If the TCP/IP stack left set to work with a Domain it has to be reconfigure
    in order to work with general None domain connection.
    You can set it for them by setting the Alternative TCP/IP configuration to
    default to None Domain Auto.
    http://www.ezlan.net/faq#fewtcp-ip
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Don Wilkinson" <> wrote in message
    news:uHtBr%...
    >I feel like I should already know this stuff, being an IT guy for 15 years
    > and all, but, somehow, I've mostly managed to avoid learning about
    > wireless... until now. :)
    >
    > So, the office is a Windows shop with a bunch of WAPs on the same SSID
    > using
    > WEP (yeah, it's weak, I know). When setting up a laptop for a Domain user
    > I
    > log in as admin, set it up, log out and hand over the laptop. When they
    > go
    > home and try to use the home network wireless, they are, reportedly,
    > unable
    > to set things up - as in, can't enter WEP keys and such. They get errors
    > about not having access to change settings. User's domain account is a
    > member of the local Power Users group. SOUNDS like they need to have
    > administrator level permission on the system. Is this right?
    >
    > Please tell me I don't have to give them admin privs for them to be able
    > to
    > use their laptop at Starbuck or at the client site. I mean really....
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Don
    >
     
    Jack, Apr 22, 2006
    #2
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  3. Thanks Jack,

    I think you're reply is not addressing the concern I have. I'm assuming that
    these laptops will continue to log into Windows using the company domain.
    That token will live for days locally and I don't enforce an GPO that
    requires domain authentication on each session or anything like that.

    What I am talking about is the Wireless Zero Configuration environment where
    one configures their Wireless networking for a new network. The scenario I
    was given was where one takes the system home and wants to use the consumer
    wireless gadget they have at home. They need to use that WAP and set it for
    basic security like WEP 64-bit. The report I have, unverified, is that they
    get messages saying that they can't complete the steps and enter the WEP
    key, for example, because they do NOT have administrative priveleges.

    Thanks,
    Don


    "Jack" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi
    > If the TCP/IP stack left set to work with a Domain it has to be
    > reconfigure in order to work with general None domain connection.
    > You can set it for them by setting the Alternative TCP/IP configuration to
    > default to None Domain Auto.
    > http://www.ezlan.net/faq#fewtcp-ip
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    > "Don Wilkinson" <> wrote in message
    > news:uHtBr%...
    >>I feel like I should already know this stuff, being an IT guy for 15 years
    >> and all, but, somehow, I've mostly managed to avoid learning about
    >> wireless... until now. :)
    >>
    >> So, the office is a Windows shop with a bunch of WAPs on the same SSID
    >> using
    >> WEP (yeah, it's weak, I know). When setting up a laptop for a Domain
    >> user I
    >> log in as admin, set it up, log out and hand over the laptop. When they
    >> go
    >> home and try to use the home network wireless, they are, reportedly,
    >> unable
    >> to set things up - as in, can't enter WEP keys and such. They get errors
    >> about not having access to change settings. User's domain account is a
    >> member of the local Power Users group. SOUNDS like they need to have
    >> administrator level permission on the system. Is this right?
    >>
    >> Please tell me I don't have to give them admin privs for them to be able
    >> to
    >> use their laptop at Starbuck or at the client site. I mean really....
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance,
    >> Don
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Don Wilkinson, Apr 24, 2006
    #3
  4. Don Wilkinson

    Eugene Guest

    When they go home and connect, they are morethan likely trying to connect to
    a workgroup. But the computer is setup to connect to a domain. Have them
    write the domain information down, change the computer to
    workgroup(providing they have admin rights locally) they should be good to
    go.

    "Don Wilkinson" <> wrote in message
    news:uHtBr#...
    > I feel like I should already know this stuff, being an IT guy for 15 years
    > and all, but, somehow, I've mostly managed to avoid learning about
    > wireless... until now. :)
    >
    > So, the office is a Windows shop with a bunch of WAPs on the same SSID

    using
    > WEP (yeah, it's weak, I know). When setting up a laptop for a Domain user

    I
    > log in as admin, set it up, log out and hand over the laptop. When they

    go
    > home and try to use the home network wireless, they are, reportedly,

    unable
    > to set things up - as in, can't enter WEP keys and such. They get errors
    > about not having access to change settings. User's domain account is a
    > member of the local Power Users group. SOUNDS like they need to have
    > administrator level permission on the system. Is this right?
    >
    > Please tell me I don't have to give them admin privs for them to be able

    to
    > use their laptop at Starbuck or at the client site. I mean really....
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Don
    >
    >
     
    Eugene, May 9, 2006
    #4
  5. Don Wilkinson

    Malke Guest

    Eugene wrote:

    > When they go home and connect, they are morethan likely trying to
    > connect to a workgroup. But the computer is setup to connect to a
    > domain. Have them write the domain information down, change the
    > computer to workgroup(providing they have admin rights locally) they
    > should be good to go.


    Yes, and when they get back to the office they will find they are no
    longer joined to the domain and the IT Dept. will need to rejoin them.
    There will be a lot of aggravation on all sides.

    > "Don Wilkinson" <> wrote in message
    > news:uHtBr#...
    >> I feel like I should already know this stuff, being an IT guy for 15
    >> years and all, but, somehow, I've mostly managed to avoid learning
    >> about wireless... until now. :)
    >>
    >> So, the office is a Windows shop with a bunch of WAPs on the same
    >> SSID using WEP (yeah, it's weak, I know). When setting up a laptop
    >>for a Domain user log in as admin, set it up, log out and hand over
    >>the laptop. When they go home and try to use the home network
    >>wireless, they are, reportedly, unable to set things up - as in,
    >>can't enter WEP keys and such. They get errors about not having
    >>access to change settings. User's domain account is a member of the
    >>local Power Users group. SOUNDS like they need to have administrator
    >>level permission on the system. Is this right?


    You could make a local user account for them and show them how to log
    onto it. Or better still (because having a user with a local account on
    a work computer isn't the best choice) see this information about using
    Workgroup resources with a domain-member laptop:

    (credit MVP Lanwench)

    You don't need to change to a workgroup just to access resources on it.
    You shouldn't play with your laptop's network settings at all. Once
    you've logged in using your domain account (using cached credentials),
    and have an IP address on the home network, you can map drives, use
    printers, whatnot, very easily - one way, in a command line:

    net use x: \\computername\sharename /user:computername\username <enter>

    MS KB article about the Net Use command - http://tinyurl.com/3bpnj

    Also see:

    Managing One Windows XP-based Laptop for the Office and Home by MVP
    Charlie Russel - http://tinyurl.com/cpy9q

    http://winhlp.com/wxdomainworkgroup.htm - MVP Hans-Georg Michna

    Malke
    --
    Elephant Boy Computers
    www.elephantboycomputers.com
    "Don't Panic!"
    MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
     
    Malke, May 9, 2006
    #5
  6. Don Wilkinson

    Eugene Guest

    Never said it was the perfect solution, just offered one(worked with
    previous client-that's why I suggested writing the domain information down).

    -Eugene


    "Malke" <> wrote in message
    news:uq$...
    > Eugene wrote:
    >
    > > When they go home and connect, they are morethan likely trying to
    > > connect to a workgroup. But the computer is setup to connect to a
    > > domain. Have them write the domain information down, change the
    > > computer to workgroup(providing they have admin rights locally) they
    > > should be good to go.

    >
    > Yes, and when they get back to the office they will find they are no
    > longer joined to the domain and the IT Dept. will need to rejoin them.
    > There will be a lot of aggravation on all sides.
    >
    > > "Don Wilkinson" <> wrote in message
    > > news:uHtBr#...
    > >> I feel like I should already know this stuff, being an IT guy for 15
    > >> years and all, but, somehow, I've mostly managed to avoid learning
    > >> about wireless... until now. :)
    > >>
    > >> So, the office is a Windows shop with a bunch of WAPs on the same
    > >> SSID using WEP (yeah, it's weak, I know). When setting up a laptop
    > >>for a Domain user log in as admin, set it up, log out and hand over
    > >>the laptop. When they go home and try to use the home network
    > >>wireless, they are, reportedly, unable to set things up - as in,
    > >>can't enter WEP keys and such. They get errors about not having
    > >>access to change settings. User's domain account is a member of the
    > >>local Power Users group. SOUNDS like they need to have administrator
    > >>level permission on the system. Is this right?

    >
    > You could make a local user account for them and show them how to log
    > onto it. Or better still (because having a user with a local account on
    > a work computer isn't the best choice) see this information about using
    > Workgroup resources with a domain-member laptop:
    >
    > (credit MVP Lanwench)
    >
    > You don't need to change to a workgroup just to access resources on it.
    > You shouldn't play with your laptop's network settings at all. Once
    > you've logged in using your domain account (using cached credentials),
    > and have an IP address on the home network, you can map drives, use
    > printers, whatnot, very easily - one way, in a command line:
    >
    > net use x: \\computername\sharename /user:computername\username <enter>
    >
    > MS KB article about the Net Use command - http://tinyurl.com/3bpnj
    >
    > Also see:
    >
    > Managing One Windows XP-based Laptop for the Office and Home by MVP
    > Charlie Russel - http://tinyurl.com/cpy9q
    >
    > http://winhlp.com/wxdomainworkgroup.htm - MVP Hans-Georg Michna
    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > Elephant Boy Computers
    > www.elephantboycomputers.com
    > "Don't Panic!"
    > MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
     
    Eugene, May 9, 2006
    #6
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