Reporter seeking info...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by AtticusF, Nov 3, 2004.

  1. AtticusF

    AtticusF Guest

    Hey, gang:

    I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.

    I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    buying a digital camera, including resolution, battery life, storage
    (memory) types, manual controls, ease-of-use, flash, zoom (optical vs.
    digital), LCD size and brightness, computer platform compatibility,
    optical viewfinder, types of lenses accepted (or not), etc, but am
    lacking in the specifics.

    What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    mean.

    My deadline is not far away, so any advice would be appreciated, even
    it's nothing more than a pointer to a Web site or how-to book.

    If emailing directly, use .

    Thanks so much!

    Atticus Fisher
     
    AtticusF, Nov 3, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. AtticusF wrote:
    []
    > What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    > factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    > down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    > technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    > the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    > mean.


    1 - by what they want to achieve, and how much they are prepared to pay:

    e.g. subjects: family snap-shots, children, sports events, close-ups,
    safari holiday, architecture. Photos for: direct printing, putting on the
    Web, e-mailing to friends, display on TV etc?

    The suitable camera types follow from that, but one so often hears
    requests for advice where you can't give a sensible answer as you don't
    know what someone is trying to do.


    2 - sites like:

    http://www.dpreview.com/

    http://www.steves-digicams.com/

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Nov 3, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. AtticusF

    Charles Guest

    On 3 Nov 2004 08:58:00 -0800, (AtticusF)
    wrote:

    >Hey, gang:
    >
    >I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    >just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    >wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    >photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.
    >
    >I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    >buying a digital camera, including resolution, battery life, storage
    >(memory) types, manual controls, ease-of-use, flash, zoom (optical vs.
    >digital), LCD size and brightness, computer platform compatibility,
    >optical viewfinder, types of lenses accepted (or not), etc, but am
    >lacking in the specifics.
    >
    >What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    >factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    >down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    >technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    >the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    >mean.
    >
    >My deadline is not far away, so any advice would be appreciated, even
    >it's nothing more than a pointer to a Web site or how-to book.
    >
    >If emailing directly, use .
    >
    >Thanks so much!
    >
    >Atticus Fisher



    It seems to me that a good entry point is to determine why the reader
    wants the camera, what they intend to do with it.

    Heavy duty business use, where an income is dependent on the
    reliability of the camera, hobby photography where the object is to
    satisfy the user's artistic ambitions, something to use to document
    other interests, hobby, growing kids.

    This would affect the budget and the amount of time the purchaser is
    willing to spend mastering the camera.

    Technical details: www,dpreview.com and links from that site.


    --

    - Charles
    -
    -does not play well with others
     
    Charles, Nov 3, 2004
    #3
  4. AtticusF

    Owamanga Guest

    On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 17:45:43 GMT, Charles <>
    wrote:

    >On 3 Nov 2004 08:58:00 -0800, (AtticusF)
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Hey, gang:
    >>
    >>I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    >>just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    >>wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    >>photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.
    >>
    >>I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    >>buying a digital camera, including resolution, battery life, storage
    >>(memory) types, manual controls, ease-of-use, flash, zoom (optical vs.
    >>digital), LCD size and brightness, computer platform compatibility,
    >>optical viewfinder, types of lenses accepted (or not), etc, but am
    >>lacking in the specifics.
    >>
    >>What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    >>factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    >>down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    >>technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    >>the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    >>mean.
    >>
    >>My deadline is not far away, so any advice would be appreciated, even
    >>it's nothing more than a pointer to a Web site or how-to book.
    >>
    >>If emailing directly, use .
    >>
    >>Thanks so much!
    >>
    >>Atticus Fisher

    >
    >
    >It seems to me that a good entry point is to determine why the reader
    >wants the camera, what they intend to do with it.
    >
    >Heavy duty business use, where an income is dependent on the
    >reliability of the camera, hobby photography where the object is to
    >satisfy the user's artistic ambitions, something to use to document
    >other interests, hobby, growing kids.
    >
    >This would affect the budget and the amount of time the purchaser is
    >willing to spend mastering the camera.
    >
    >Technical details: www,dpreview.com and links from that site.


    Not to forget the digital camera replaces the polaroid for home-made
    porn. You should definitely cover that angle in your article.

    :)

    --
    Owamanga!
     
    Owamanga, Nov 3, 2004
    #4
  5. AtticusF

    Bryce Guest

    As a contributing writer, surely you've queried Google?


    "AtticusF" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey, gang:
    >
    > I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    > just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    > wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    > photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.
    >
    > I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    > buying a digital camera, including resolution, battery life, storage
    > (memory) types, manual controls, ease-of-use, flash, zoom (optical vs.
    > digital), LCD size and brightness, computer platform compatibility,
    > optical viewfinder, types of lenses accepted (or not), etc, but am
    > lacking in the specifics.
    >
    > What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    > factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    > down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    > technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    > the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    > mean.
    >
    > My deadline is not far away, so any advice would be appreciated, even
    > it's nothing more than a pointer to a Web site or how-to book.
    >
    > If emailing directly, use .
    >
    > Thanks so much!
    >
    > Atticus Fisher
     
    Bryce, Nov 3, 2004
    #5
  6. AtticusF

    Aerticus Guest

    would you like my consultancy fees?

    Aerticus

    "AtticusF" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey, gang:
    >
    > I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    > just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    > wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    > photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.
    >
    > I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    > buying a digital camera, including resolution, battery life, storage
    > (memory) types, manual controls, ease-of-use, flash, zoom (optical vs.
    > digital), LCD size and brightness, computer platform compatibility,
    > optical viewfinder, types of lenses accepted (or not), etc, but am
    > lacking in the specifics.
    >
    > What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    > factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    > down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    > technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    > the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    > mean.
    >
    > My deadline is not far away, so any advice would be appreciated, even
    > it's nothing more than a pointer to a Web site or how-to book.
    >
    > If emailing directly, use .
    >
    > Thanks so much!
    >
    > Atticus Fisher
     
    Aerticus, Nov 3, 2004
    #6
  7. AtticusF

    BobS Guest

    Someone once said "Follow the money". I'll revise that a bit and say
    "Follow the marketing". These camera companies probably spend more money on
    marketing their products than they do on research and development. You seem
    to have a handle on the technicalities of selecting a camera but that always
    isn't what "sells" a camera or what persuades one to purchase a particular
    camera. Marketing does. Perception vs. technical specs - which do you think
    sells more cameras?

    Look at the -vast- number of digital cameras available, some with 10's of
    models available from each company. Most are simply repackaged,
    dumbed-down, price-point driven derivatives of the more featured models in
    different skins. Look at each model line, make a chart and break them down
    into subdivisions and compare features. Now look at the price-points and you
    can then determine which market segment the camera was targeted for and what
    features they can expect for X dollars. That's opposite the approach of "How
    much should I spend for feature X". Perhaps contacting a few manufacturers
    and asking them why they developed a product the way they did (what were the
    drivers) will get you some valuable insight for your article.

    You could go to a store like Best Buy (or one that does not just sell
    cameras) and ask the salesperson to help you select a camera. If they've
    received any training at all, you'll get the standard talk about megapixels
    and perhaps hear a word or two about some common features and functions
    while they're trying to figure out how much you're willing to part with.
    Some will ask - point blank, "What's your budget" and that then determines
    the features and functionality you will get. Only used car salesmen used to
    get the look you'll give him...

    Now go to a real camera store and one that hopefully sells several name
    brands and ask the same question. You'll certainly be asked some questions
    that will size you up as to how much time they'll spend with you (tire
    kicker or future customer..). They hopefully subscribe to the theory that
    an educated customer makes a better customer and that their products and
    services are a total package that they can offer you - plus a long term
    commitment. Be prepared to get technical and to discuss pro's and con's and
    feature benefits of each brand as well as be questioned about your intended
    use and most of all - your expectations.

    My priorities in making many purchase decisions are: (not in order of
    preference)

    1. Who will I purchase the product from and why?
    2. Do they understand my needs, can they properly advise me and can I trust
    them?
    3. Their product knowledge, experience and local business presence have
    definite value to me - how much am I willing to pay for that?
    4. What is their reputation?

    So, in my opinion, you need to include how you determine -who- you purchase
    a camera from as one of the most important factors to consider.

    And "Should you switch to digital?" opens Pandora's box. The person that
    buy's a point-and-shoot camera, takes the media to the local plug 'n print
    machine and hopes for the best - needs the most help in selecting the
    smartest camera available and is the one that will benefit the most from a
    retailer that knows the products. The amateur/advanced hobbyist, will
    already be aware that they will need a certain level of computer skills and
    the hardware investment to use the myriad of software available that will
    enable them to make better pictures. Levels above the amateur.... I would
    have to assume they're all over the map from what I've read and I doubt
    they'll be reading your introductory article.

    Some of these may be helpful.

    http://www.dpreview.com
    http://www.dpreview.com/articles/photokina2004/
    http://www.photozone.de/2Equipment/easytxt.htm
    http://media.gn.apc.org/feesguide/photo.html
    http://www.koelnmesse.de/wEnglisch/photokina/index.htm
    http://www.popularphotography.com/default.asp?section_id=4
    http://www.offrench.net/photos/articles/portable_storage_devices.php
    http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/index.asp

    Bob S.


    "AtticusF" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey, gang:
    >
    > I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    > just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    > wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    > photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.
    >
    > I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    > buying a digital camera, including resolution, battery life, storage
    > (memory) types, manual controls, ease-of-use, flash, zoom (optical vs.
    > digital), LCD size and brightness, computer platform compatibility,
    > optical viewfinder, types of lenses accepted (or not), etc, but am
    > lacking in the specifics.
    >
    > What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    > factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    > down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    > technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    > the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    > mean.
    >
    > My deadline is not far away, so any advice would be appreciated, even
    > it's nothing more than a pointer to a Web site or how-to book.
    >
    > If emailing directly, use .
    >
    > Thanks so much!
    >
    > Atticus Fisher
     
    BobS, Nov 3, 2004
    #7
  8. AtticusF

    Owamanga Guest

    On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 21:03:20 GMT, "BobS" <> wrote:

    >Someone once said "Follow the money". I'll revise that a bit and say
    >"Follow the marketing".


    And remember to mention that Nikons are better than Canons.

    ...or the other way round, it really doesn't matter.

    --
    Owamanga!
     
    Owamanga, Nov 3, 2004
    #8
  9. AtticusF

    Frank ess Guest

    AtticusF wrote:
    > Hey, gang:
    >
    > I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    > just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    > wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    > photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.
    >


    A little reality never hurts:

    No matter how much they study, no matter which bit of hardware digital
    novices settle on, they will learn more _after_ they make the plunge.
    Every post-purchase experience will have increased meaning in comparison
    to comparison sites and camera specifications.

    If they have, through experience or study, developed a list of "needs"
    or requirements, they may find a different approach useful: think in
    terms of which camera falls short in fewest critical areas rather than
    trying (in vain) to find one that is perfect.

    My own recommendation would be to buy a mid- or low-range 3-or-more MP
    camera with the expectation that after a few months' use they will make
    a better decision when and if they decide to move up, how far to move
    up, and when. That way the original investment may turn out to be
    sufficient and modest; if not, lesser wasted early expense and better
    decisions in later acquisitions will be benefits.

    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Nov 3, 2004
    #9
  10. AtticusF

    Bruce Lewis Guest

    (AtticusF) writes:

    > My editor wants an introductory article targeted at the general user
    > and/or film photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.


    Slightly serious film photographers already have sources of information
    about digital. I would suggest targeting more narrowly at the general
    user. My answers will be more along those lines.

    > I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    > buying a digital camera


    That's good; it probably corresponds to what people are thinking about.

    > including resolution


    People who find that a lot of their photos come out as tiny figures in a
    huge background would benefit from 5MP cameras. For those who almost
    always frame their shots nicely 3MP is more than enough.

    > battery life


    Absolutely an important comparison factor.

    > storage (memory) types


    Any camera you find in the store today will hook up to your computer by
    USB and look like a disk drive. The various memory types are not
    entirely irrelevant, but are probably the last thing I'd talk to a
    general user about.

    > manual controls, ease-of-use


    Very important, and you should definitely tell people to try before they
    buy. You can quickly find out how easy it is to get a good shot.

    > zoom (optical vs. digital)


    You may actually get consensus on this one: digital zoom is vastly
    inferior to optical zoom. With digital zoom you're guaranteed to lose
    resolution; with optical zoom it just depends on the lighting and how
    steady you hold the camera.

    > LCD size and brightness


    In my opinion this matters little. All that matters is how easily you
    can zoom in to spot-check the quality of the shot.

    > computer platform compatibility


    This has been standardized into almost a non-issue, at least in terms of
    downloading from the camera.

    For uploading to the camera, there may be compatibility issues.
    However, uploading to an Internet print service has sufficed for me. I
    exclusively use Debian GNU/Linux with my camera, and the gphoto2 driver
    unfortunately doesn't support uploading for my Canon Powershot S45.

    > optical viewfinder


    This is key. A friend of mine just went through a pile of 105 photos
    from a new digital camera, and many of them were blurry. I think it's
    awfully tough to stay steady while holding the camera in front of you
    and watching the LCD. Remind your general users to put both elbows
    against their body and use both hands to press the camera up to their
    face.

    > types of lenses accepted (or not)


    SLR cameras are probably something for a whole different article.

    > etc


    Orientation sensor: The camera senses its orientatation at the time a
    photo is shot, and records it in the JPEG file. For general users who
    wouldn't otherwise fuss over each individual photo, not having to rotate
    means saving significant work.

    Please let us know when the article comes out.


    --
    Make that pile of digital photos presentable: http://ourdoings.com/
    It's quicker and easier than you think.
     
    Bruce Lewis, Nov 3, 2004
    #10
  11. "AtticusF" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey, gang:
    >
    > I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    > just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    > wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    > photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.
    >
    > I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    > buying a digital camera, including resolution, battery life, storage
    > (memory) types, manual controls, ease-of-use, flash, zoom (optical vs.
    > digital), LCD size and brightness, computer platform compatibility,
    > optical viewfinder, types of lenses accepted (or not), etc, but am
    > lacking in the specifics.
    >
    > What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    > factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    > down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    > technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    > the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    > mean.
    >
    > My deadline is not far away, so any advice would be appreciated, even
    > it's nothing more than a pointer to a Web site or how-to book.
    >
    > If emailing directly, use .
    >
    > Thanks so much!
    >
    > Atticus Fisher


    Why doesn't the newspaper employ an expert? Or at least someone who can do
    his own research?
     
    Gerrit 't Hart, Nov 3, 2004
    #11
  12. AtticusF

    Charles Guest

    On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 21:12:18 GMT, Owamanga <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 21:03:20 GMT, "BobS" <> wrote:
    >
    >>Someone once said "Follow the money". I'll revise that a bit and say
    >>"Follow the marketing".

    >
    >And remember to mention that Nikons are better than Canons.
    >
    >..or the other way round, it really doesn't matter.



    And Sigmas are best, that's what somebody said.


    --

    - Charles
    -
    -does not play well with others
     
    Charles, Nov 4, 2004
    #12
  13. Hey, gang:

    Thanks so much for the responses (and flames). In case I left a false
    impression, I don't intend to exploit the knowledge of this group and
    cash in the check. I am most definitely going to conduct this research
    on my own. Google is one of the first places I went to after the
    managing editor called. :)

    All I'm looking for is information to get me pointed in the right
    direction. Like any other area of technology, I'm fully aware that
    along with wars (Mac vs. PC, Canon vs. Nikon, CMOS vs CCD, this vs.
    that) that will never be resolved, there are the usual gotchas,
    pitfalls, and tarpits propagated by both the manufacturers and common
    public misperception that I need to help my readers naviagate. My
    editor wants me to provide encyclopedic information that will educate
    the consumer, so this time around, I'm avoiding references to specific
    camera brands and resellers. Just the facts, ma'am.

    As for credentials, no, I'm not a DC expert. I'm merely a freelance
    writer (with a full-time job as a technical writer for a software
    company) who happens to enjoy tinkering with, and writing about,
    computers and related technology. A DC expert would be insulted by what
    the Phoenix pays its stringers, so you get me instead. :)

    Atticus

    In article
    <4189706d$0$6539$>, Gerrit
    't Hart <> wrote:

    >
    > Why doesn't the newspaper employ an expert? Or at least someone who can do
    > his own research?
    >
    >
     
    Atticus Fisher, Nov 4, 2004
    #13
  14. Its been mentioned many times that DPreview.com is a place to go...but it
    really is a place to start. They have a comparative data base where you
    enter the features that are important to you and it shows the camera that
    meets your needs. That means of course your technical needs. I am a pro and
    don't mine having a camera in my hand at all times...people know to shake my
    left hand as the right is busy. Most non pros want something less
    intrusive...so size is a factor. Cost is the next feature for the buyer to
    consider. No point telling them about features they cannot afford....like
    removable lenses. There is no point to buying a new camera with under 4
    mp...not sure you even can. Be prepared to toss out the memory chip that
    comes with the camera....they are too small. Check to see how big your
    biggest file will be and get a chip that will hold 3 dozen of them....and
    get 2. You will need extra batteries and a charger and a case for the
    batteries. Cameras with base stations are easier for beginners...but not
    necessary. If no base station get a reader.

    That is a good start


    "AtticusF" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey, gang:
    >
    > I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    > just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    > wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    > photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.
    >
    > I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    > buying a digital camera, including resolution, battery life, storage
    > (memory) types, manual controls, ease-of-use, flash, zoom (optical vs.
    > digital), LCD size and brightness, computer platform compatibility,
    > optical viewfinder, types of lenses accepted (or not), etc, but am
    > lacking in the specifics.
    >
    > What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    > factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    > down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    > technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    > the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    > mean.
    >
    > My deadline is not far away, so any advice would be appreciated, even
    > it's nothing more than a pointer to a Web site or how-to book.
    >
    > If emailing directly, use .
    >
    > Thanks so much!
    >
    > Atticus Fisher
     
    Gene Palmiter, Nov 4, 2004
    #14
  15. My employer insults me every Friday....so feel free!

    "Atticus Fisher" <> wrote in message
    news:031120041945306506%...
    > Hey, gang:
    >
    > Thanks so much for the responses (and flames). In case I left a false
    > impression, I don't intend to exploit the knowledge of this group and
    > cash in the check. I am most definitely going to conduct this research
    > on my own. Google is one of the first places I went to after the
    > managing editor called. :)
    >
    > All I'm looking for is information to get me pointed in the right
    > direction. Like any other area of technology, I'm fully aware that
    > along with wars (Mac vs. PC, Canon vs. Nikon, CMOS vs CCD, this vs.
    > that) that will never be resolved, there are the usual gotchas,
    > pitfalls, and tarpits propagated by both the manufacturers and common
    > public misperception that I need to help my readers naviagate. My
    > editor wants me to provide encyclopedic information that will educate
    > the consumer, so this time around, I'm avoiding references to specific
    > camera brands and resellers. Just the facts, ma'am.
    >
    > As for credentials, no, I'm not a DC expert. I'm merely a freelance
    > writer (with a full-time job as a technical writer for a software
    > company) who happens to enjoy tinkering with, and writing about,
    > computers and related technology. A DC expert would be insulted by what
    > the Phoenix pays its stringers, so you get me instead. :)
    >
    > Atticus
    >
    > In article
    > <4189706d$0$6539$>, Gerrit
    > 't Hart <> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Why doesn't the newspaper employ an expert? Or at least someone who can

    do
    > > his own research?
    > >
    > >
     
    Gene Palmiter, Nov 4, 2004
    #15
  16. AtticusF

    Big Bill Guest

    On 3 Nov 2004 08:58:00 -0800, (AtticusF)
    wrote:

    >Hey, gang:
    >
    >I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    >just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    >wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    >photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.


    I'd sugest you look into your own employer's archives to see how
    others have handled the same assigment, but with different hardware as
    the target.
    IOW, how has the Phoenix handled the same query about ISPs?
    Breadmakers?
    You aren't going to be able to go into any depth; you just won't have
    the space. You're barely going to be able to describe the most
    elemental of concepts; what's a pixel, and are more good? What's zoom,
    and how much is good? What's digital zoom? What's a memory card?
    Remember yout target audience: the general user and/or film
    photographer who wants to make the leap to digital. This person
    already understands the very basics of photography, and wants to know
    the basic info about digital. Stick to that: the basics.
    Good luck!

    Bill Funk
    Change "g" to "a"
     
    Big Bill, Nov 4, 2004
    #16
  17. AtticusF

    GT40 Guest

    You should ask your staff photographers, they know all that stuff.

    On 3 Nov 2004 08:58:00 -0800, (AtticusF)
    wrote:

    >Hey, gang:
    >
    >I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    >just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    >wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    >photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.
    >
    >I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    >buying a digital camera, including resolution, battery life, storage
    >(memory) types, manual controls, ease-of-use, flash, zoom (optical vs.
    >digital), LCD size and brightness, computer platform compatibility,
    >optical viewfinder, types of lenses accepted (or not), etc, but am
    >lacking in the specifics.
    >
    >What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    >factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    >down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    >technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    >the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    >mean.
    >
    >My deadline is not far away, so any advice would be appreciated, even
    >it's nothing more than a pointer to a Web site or how-to book.
    >
    >If emailing directly, use .
    >
    >Thanks so much!
    >
    >Atticus Fisher
     
    GT40, Nov 4, 2004
    #17
  18. AtticusF

    Bruce Lewis Guest

    "Gerrit 't Hart" <> writes:

    > Why doesn't the newspaper employ an expert?


    Most experts are bad at teaching or explaining their area of expertise.
    There are too many things that they just don't think about anymore and
    don't realize other people don't know.

    > Or at least someone who can do his own research?


    The problems I see in newspaper articles generally have to do with
    writers not having asked around enough. I'd rather they ask here and
    get 50 different opinions than do their own googling and end up missing
    something important.

    --
    Make that pile of digital photos presentable: http://ourdoings.com/
    It's quicker and easier than you think.
     
    Bruce Lewis, Nov 4, 2004
    #18
  19. Keep it coming....

    Some more info: my word limit is 4,200. So I do have some room to work
    with, but it will be a shotgun approach. I can't get too in-depth about
    any one topic or the article will bog down.

    Staff photographers? What are those? ;-) Because I'm a freelancer, I
    have contact with only two editors. But calling a couple of staff
    photos might be a good idea. I have also contacted a photography
    instructor at a local school (New England School of Photography).

    Other helpful information can include common misconceptions as
    propagated by industry marketroids, or lack of public knowledge, or
    both. There's plenty of that in the PC world, so I'm assuming it exists
    in the digital camera realm. If so, you guys would know. Usenet-ers
    tend to have "local knowledge" about any given topic.

    Atticus


    In article <>, GT40
    <> wrote:

    > You should ask your staff photographers, they know all that stuff.
    >
    > On 3 Nov 2004 08:58:00 -0800, (AtticusF)
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Hey, gang:
    > >
    > >I'm a contributing writer for the Boston Phoenix and writing a
    > >just-in-time-for-the-holidays piece on digital photography. My editor
    > >wants an introductory article targeted at the general user and/or film
    > >photographer who wants to make the leap to digital.
    > >
    > >I have a vague general knowledge of the factors to consider when
    > >buying a digital camera, including resolution, battery life, storage
    > >(memory) types, manual controls, ease-of-use, flash, zoom (optical vs.
    > >digital), LCD size and brightness, computer platform compatibility,
    > >optical viewfinder, types of lenses accepted (or not), etc, but am
    > >lacking in the specifics.
    > >
    > >What I'm looking for, then, is two things: 1) the most important
    > >factors to consider when buying a digital camera. Should I break it
    > >down by need (point-and-shoot, prosumer, and pro?) Or organize by
    > >technical spec (resolution, controls, etc)? And 2) where I might find
    > >the nitty gritty details about technical specifications and what they
    > >mean.
    > >
    > >My deadline is not far away, so any advice would be appreciated, even
    > >it's nothing more than a pointer to a Web site or how-to book.
    > >
    > >If emailing directly, use .
    > >
    > >Thanks so much!
    > >
    > >Atticus Fisher

    >
     
    Atticus Fisher, Nov 4, 2004
    #19
  20. AtticusF

    Guest

    Owamanga <> writes:

    > Not to forget the digital camera replaces the polaroid for home-made
    > porn. You should definitely cover that angle in your article.


    That will be THE driver of Digicams and small photoprinters. See the
    VHS vs Beta story.

    --
    Paul Repacholi 1 Crescent Rd.,
    +61 (08) 9257-1001 Kalamunda.
    West Australia 6076
    comp.os.vms,- The Older, Grumpier Slashdot
    Raw, Cooked or Well-done, it's all half baked.
    EPIC, The Architecture of the future, always has been, always will be.
     
    , Nov 4, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertising

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