Replacing fan in power supply?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Daniel, May 11, 2004.

  1. Daniel

    Daniel Guest

    I'm taking some people's suggestions & replacing my power supply fan (plan
    to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out of the case has
    been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires together or is
    twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since they wont be
    moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good enough?...but what
    about elecrical tape?...Is that strong/thick enough to be a good
    insulator?...I've got some green electrical tape from a local "Dollar
    General Store" here...quality may not be best but is that allot of concern,
    or is it required to at least be safe & OK for wires that wont be moving?).

    I'd like to test the new fan before hooking the whole thing up for long
    term. What is the best way to do this? I can cut the wires, leave some
    exposed as I'm connecting it to the old power supply & can simply use a volt
    meter to make sure the voltage (or even can check amps if needed) is OK (do
    have equipment for that).

    I've done this sort of thing before, but am checking/refreshing/looking for
    someone with personal experience, due to this IS 300W & also hooked up to
    $XXXX worth of other electronics (dont want to accidently let the too high
    power burn through the tape & shoot 300W through the ground wires in my
    computer...or anything else like that).

    --

    Daniel

    --

    There are 10 types of people in this world...
    ....those that understand binary & those that don't.
     
    Daniel, May 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. Daniel

    Sano Guest

    On Mon, 10 May 2004 18:41:06 -0500, Daniel wrote:

    replacing my power supply fan (plan
    > to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out of the case has
    > been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires together or is
    > twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since they wont be
    > moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good enough?...but what
    > about elecrical tape?


    Uh, yeah, I'd solder them. And put heatshrink on 'em.

    But at the very least use some wirenuts.
     
    Sano, May 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. Daniel

    SgtMinor Guest

    Daniel wrote:
    >
    > I'm taking some people's suggestions & replacing my power supply fan (plan
    > to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out of the case has
    > been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires together or is
    > twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since they wont be
    > moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good enough?...but what
    > about elecrical tape?...Is that strong/thick enough to be a good
    > insulator?...I've got some green electrical tape from a local "Dollar
    > General Store" here...quality may not be best but is that allot of concern,
    > or is it required to at least be safe & OK for wires that wont be moving?).
    >
    > I'd like to test the new fan before hooking the whole thing up for long
    > term. What is the best way to do this? I can cut the wires, leave some
    > exposed as I'm connecting it to the old power supply & can simply use a volt
    > meter to make sure the voltage (or even can check amps if needed) is OK (do
    > have equipment for that).
    >
    > I've done this sort of thing before, but am checking/refreshing/looking for
    > someone with personal experience, due to this IS 300W & also hooked up to
    > $XXXX worth of other electronics (dont want to accidently let the too high
    > power burn through the tape & shoot 300W through the ground wires in my
    > computer...or anything else like that).
    >
    > --
    >
    > Daniel


    You could solder the wires together but then you'd need some heat
    activated shrink tube or the tape solution. Cheap tape is crap - it
    loses adhesion and comes apart, especially in warm environments. Use
    'wire nuts' instead, twist connectors for electrical wiring. They're a
    bit more bulky but you can use some tie wrap to secure them out of the
    way of the airflow.

    But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
    sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
    item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?
     
    SgtMinor, May 11, 2004
    #3
  4. Daniel

    slumpy Guest

    ....and seconds before the explosion, SgtMinor emerged from the bunker
    carrying the last chicken tikka masala humanity would ever see, crying:

    > But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
    > sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
    > item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?


    Got to be the best option - probably not much more than the cost of a fan,
    and a two-minute job. No way I'd start messing around with internal wiring
    and soldering unless there was no other option.
    --
    slumpy
    no more
    no less
    just me
    (cheap at twice the price...)
     
    slumpy, May 11, 2004
    #4
  5. Daniel

    SgtMinor Guest

    slumpy wrote:
    >
    > ...and seconds before the explosion, SgtMinor emerged from the bunker
    > carrying the last chicken tikka masala humanity would ever see, crying:
    >
    > > But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
    > > sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
    > > item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?

    >
    > Got to be the best option - probably not much more than the cost of a fan,
    > and a two-minute job. No way I'd start messing around with internal wiring
    > and soldering unless there was no other option.


    A friend of mine spent two days' hard labor, clearing brush on a ranch,
    in return for a 500 cc motorbike that 'hadn't run for awhile.' He
    'restored' the bike for about $750 plus another twenty hours of his
    labor, got it up and running and was able to sell it for $500.

    --
    "That sort of math is troubling to me."
     
    SgtMinor, May 11, 2004
    #5
  6. Daniel

    Ron Martell Guest

    "Daniel" <daniel_h_wATyahooDOTcom> wrote:

    >I'm taking some people's suggestions & replacing my power supply fan (plan
    >to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out of the case has
    >been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires together or is
    >twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since they wont be
    >moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good enough?...but what
    >about elecrical tape?...Is that strong/thick enough to be a good
    >insulator?...I've got some green electrical tape from a local "Dollar
    >General Store" here...quality may not be best but is that allot of concern,
    >or is it required to at least be safe & OK for wires that wont be moving?).
    >
    >I'd like to test the new fan before hooking the whole thing up for long
    >term. What is the best way to do this? I can cut the wires, leave some
    >exposed as I'm connecting it to the old power supply & can simply use a volt
    >meter to make sure the voltage (or even can check amps if needed) is OK (do
    >have equipment for that).
    >
    >I've done this sort of thing before, but am checking/refreshing/looking for
    >someone with personal experience, due to this IS 300W & also hooked up to
    >$XXXX worth of other electronics (dont want to accidently let the too high
    >power burn through the tape & shoot 300W through the ground wires in my
    >computer...or anything else like that).
    >


    Most, but not all, power supply fans connect to a 2 pin connector on
    the printed circuit board inside the power supply. And most
    replacement fans come with a similar connector in place.

    Another option - many of the replacement power supply fans that I buy
    come with a connector extension that plugs into an unused 4-pin drive
    power connector. What I often do, to avoid wire splicing etc, is
    just to route the new fan's power leads to the outside of the power
    supply (using the same hole as the other power leads) and then using
    the extension to plug it into an unused connector.

    Good luck


    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

    "The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't eat much."
     
    Ron Martell, May 11, 2004
    #6
  7. slumpy wrote:

    > ...and seconds before the explosion, SgtMinor emerged from the bunker
    > carrying the last chicken tikka masala humanity would ever see, crying:


    >> But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
    >> sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
    >> item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?


    > Got to be the best option - probably not much more than the cost of a fan,
    > and a two-minute job. No way I'd start messing around with internal wiring
    > and soldering unless there was no other option.


    I probably wouldn't screw with it either. *But* the last small fan I
    bought was about $5 and the last PS was $119.[1] One can certainly get
    cheaper PSs than that -- but he's not going to find one for five or ten
    bucks he'd actually want to use in a system.

    [1]Retail (Fry's, for any Western USans reading this), not online-order,
    but S&H often makes up the difference, anyway.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 4892F
    AOL Diary http://snipurl.com/aoldiary
    Nigerian Scam From Space http://snipurl.com/iss419
    New Windows - Don't Wait For Longhorn! http://snipurl.com/newwin
     
    Blinky the Shark, May 11, 2004
    #7
  8. Daniel

    Daniel Guest

    > You could solder the wires together but then you'd need some heat
    > activated shrink tube or the tape solution. Cheap tape is crap - it
    > loses adhesion and comes apart, especially in warm environments. Use
    > 'wire nuts' instead, twist connectors for electrical wiring. They're a
    > bit more bulky but you can use some tie wrap to secure them out of the
    > way of the airflow.
    >

    Could do that...think I've got a few wire nuts around. (have to look through
    some stuff though).

    > But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
    > sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
    > item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?


    I did ask about that one already, about a week ago (5-5-04 1:51PM Central
    Time)....I was told by this group "why not just replace the fan?", so I ask
    about replacing the fan, and am told "why not just replace the power
    supply?".

    What is a good recommended brand of power supply to get? I've looked at
    NewEgg's
    (http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduct.asp?catalog=58&DEPA=1&submit=property
    &mfrcode=0&propertycode=&propertycodevalue=3801) list. Need 300W for AMD,
    needs to lay down in case with fan in back.
     
    Daniel, May 11, 2004
    #8
  9. Daniel

    Linda Guest

    If he needs luck, he's in trouble.

    "Ron Martell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Daniel" <daniel_h_wATyahooDOTcom> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm taking some people's suggestions & replacing my power

    supply fan (plan
    > >to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out

    of the case has
    > >been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires

    together or is
    > >twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since

    they wont be
    > >moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good

    enough?...but what
    > >about elecrical tape?...Is that strong/thick enough to be

    a good
    > >insulator?...I've got some green electrical tape from a

    local "Dollar
    > >General Store" here...quality may not be best but is that

    allot of concern,
    > >or is it required to at least be safe & OK for wires that

    wont be moving?).
    > >
    > >I'd like to test the new fan before hooking the whole

    thing up for long
    > >term. What is the best way to do this? I can cut the

    wires, leave some
    > >exposed as I'm connecting it to the old power supply &

    can simply use a volt
    > >meter to make sure the voltage (or even can check amps if

    needed) is OK (do
    > >have equipment for that).
    > >
    > >I've done this sort of thing before, but am

    checking/refreshing/looking for
    > >someone with personal experience, due to this IS 300W &

    also hooked up to
    > >$XXXX worth of other electronics (dont want to accidently

    let the too high
    > >power burn through the tape & shoot 300W through the

    ground wires in my
    > >computer...or anything else like that).
    > >

    >
    > Most, but not all, power supply fans connect to a 2 pin

    connector on
    > the printed circuit board inside the power supply. And

    most
    > replacement fans come with a similar connector in place.
    >
    > Another option - many of the replacement power supply fans

    that I buy
    > come with a connector extension that plugs into an unused

    4-pin drive
    > power connector. What I often do, to avoid wire splicing

    etc, is
    > just to route the new fan's power leads to the outside of

    the power
    > supply (using the same hole as the other power leads) and

    then using
    > the extension to plug it into an unused connector.
    >
    > Good luck
    >
    >
    > Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    > --
    > Microsoft MVP
    > On-Line Help Computer Service
    > http://onlinehelp.bc.ca
    >
    > "The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't

    eat much."
     
    Linda, May 11, 2004
    #9
  10. Daniel

    Buffalo Guest

    The fans are 'low voltage' and their leads don't require much insulation,
    unless they will rub against something.
    Even so, small wire nuts will work just fine and they can be had easily and
    cheaply.

    "Daniel" <daniel_h_wATyahooDOTcom> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm taking some people's suggestions & replacing my power supply fan (plan
    > to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out of the case has
    > been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires together or is
    > twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since they wont be
    > moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good enough?...but

    what
    > about elecrical tape?...Is that strong/thick enough to be a good
    > insulator?...I've got some green electrical tape from a local "Dollar
    > General Store" here...quality may not be best but is that allot of

    concern,
    > or is it required to at least be safe & OK for wires that wont be

    moving?).
    >
    > I'd like to test the new fan before hooking the whole thing up for long
    > term. What is the best way to do this? I can cut the wires, leave some
    > exposed as I'm connecting it to the old power supply & can simply use a

    volt
    > meter to make sure the voltage (or even can check amps if needed) is OK

    (do
    > have equipment for that).
    >
    > I've done this sort of thing before, but am checking/refreshing/looking

    for
    > someone with personal experience, due to this IS 300W & also hooked up to
    > $XXXX worth of other electronics (dont want to accidently let the too high
    > power burn through the tape & shoot 300W through the ground wires in my
    > computer...or anything else like that).
    >
    > --
    >
    > Daniel
    >
    > --
    >
    > There are 10 types of people in this world...
    > ...those that understand binary & those that don't.
    >
    >
     
    Buffalo, May 11, 2004
    #10
  11. Daniel

    SgtMinor Guest

    Daniel wrote:
    >
    > > You could solder the wires together but then you'd need some heat
    > > activated shrink tube or the tape solution. Cheap tape is crap - it
    > > loses adhesion and comes apart, especially in warm environments. Use
    > > 'wire nuts' instead, twist connectors for electrical wiring. They're a
    > > bit more bulky but you can use some tie wrap to secure them out of the
    > > way of the airflow.
    > >

    > Could do that...think I've got a few wire nuts around. (have to look through
    > some stuff though).
    >
    > > But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
    > > sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
    > > item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?

    >
    > I did ask about that one already, about a week ago (5-5-04 1:51PM Central
    > Time)....I was told by this group "why not just replace the fan?", so I ask
    > about replacing the fan, and am told "why not just replace the power
    > supply?".


    Sometimes you luck out and you get away with replacing just a part.

    >
    > What is a good recommended brand of power supply to get? I've looked at
    > NewEgg's
    > (http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduct.asp?catalog=58&DEPA=1&submit=property
    > &mfrcode=0&propertycode=&propertycodevalue=3801) list. Need 300W for AMD,
    > needs to lay down in case with fan in back.


    I haven't personally shopped for a new power supply recently but am
    planning to do so soon. Meanwhile I read some articles describing the
    issues, maybe you'll find something of interest here:

    "Inadequate and Deceptive Product Labeling: Comparison of 21 Power
    Supplies."

    http://www.tomshardware.com/howto/20021021/

    "Getting the Right Power" 15 PC Power Supply Units.

    http://www6.tomshardware.com/howto/20040122/index.html

    Calculate system power requirements:

    http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/26003.pdf

    http://www.firingsquad.com/guides/power_supply/default.asp
     
    SgtMinor, May 11, 2004
    #11
  12. Daniel wrote:
    >> You could solder the wires together but then you'd need some heat
    >> activated shrink tube or the tape solution. Cheap tape is crap - it
    >> loses adhesion and comes apart, especially in warm environments. Use
    >> 'wire nuts' instead, twist connectors for electrical wiring. They're a
    >> bit more bulky but you can use some tie wrap to secure them out of the
    >> way of the airflow.


    > Could do that...think I've got a few wire nuts around. (have to look through
    > some stuff though).


    >> But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
    >> sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
    >> item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?


    > I did ask about that one already, about a week ago (5-5-04 1:51PM Central
    > Time)....I was told by this group "why not just replace the fan?", so I ask
    > about replacing the fan, and am told "why not just replace the power
    > supply?".


    The true nature of Usenet has been revealed to you, grasshopper.

    > What is a good recommended brand of power supply to get? I've looked at
    > NewEgg's
    > (http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduct.asp?catalog=58&DEPA=1&submit=property
    > &mfrcode=0&propertycode=&propertycodevalue=3801) list. Need 300W for AMD,
    > needs to lay down in case with fan in back.


    I like the Antec TruPower series.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 4892F
    AOL Diary http://snipurl.com/aoldiary
    Nigerian Scam From Space http://snipurl.com/iss419
    New Windows - Don't Wait For Longhorn! http://snipurl.com/newwin
     
    Blinky the Shark, May 11, 2004
    #12
  13. Blinky the Shark, May 11, 2004
    #13
  14. Daniel

    Daniel Guest

    Daniel, May 11, 2004
    #14
  15. Daniel

    Daniel Guest

    "Buffalo" <eric(nospam)@nada.com.invalid> wrote in message
    news:eH5oc.26179$536.4994043@attbi_s03...
    > The fans are 'low voltage' and their leads don't require much insulation,
    > unless they will rub against something.
    > Even so, small wire nuts will work just fine and they can be had easily

    and
    > cheaply.
    >

    Though I just realized I do need to buy some....I'm apparently out.
     
    Daniel, May 11, 2004
    #15
  16. Daniel

    Daniel Guest

    "SgtMinor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I haven't personally shopped for a new power supply recently but am
    > planning to do so soon. Meanwhile I read some articles describing the
    > issues, maybe you'll find something of interest here:
    >
    > "Inadequate and Deceptive Product Labeling: Comparison of 21 Power
    > Supplies."
    >
    > http://www.tomshardware.com/howto/20021021/
    >
    > "Getting the Right Power" 15 PC Power Supply Units.
    >
    > http://www6.tomshardware.com/howto/20040122/index.html
    >
    > Calculate system power requirements:
    >
    >

    http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/2600
    3.pdf
    >
    > http://www.firingsquad.com/guides/power_supply/default.asp


    Thanks for the links. You also finally inspired me to set up a new Yahoo
    filter for this kind of stuff. I own my Yahoo account (for larger storage +
    POP3/SMTP access + more filtering) & have some filters set up to stop &
    auto-sort certain incoming mail into folders which wont be downloaded from
    (to keep it on the server & sort it for me so I can retrieve it from
    anywhere + guarentee it's safety). I've now finally set up a technical info
    filter as well.
     
    Daniel, May 11, 2004
    #16
  17. Blinky the Shark, May 11, 2004
    #17
  18. Daniel

    Daniel Guest

    "Blinky the Shark" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Daniel wrote:
    >
    > > "Blinky the Shark" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...

    >
    > >> I like the Antec TruPower series.

    >
    > > After the reading of those other articles, I'm getting the Antec

    True330.
    >
    > Enjoy.
    >

    I don't have the need yet for a 380 (in the links that were listed), so
    going with the 330. Also looks like someone on NewEgg doesn't know much
    about power supplies & was overloading theirs or was using the wrong voltage
    input setting or something (fried 2 replacements + the original...after 3
    bad of anything, I'd be thinking it is NOT the product).

    > --
    > Blinky Linux Registered User 4892F
    > AOL Diary http://snipurl.com/aoldiary
    > Nigerian Scam From Space http://snipurl.com/iss419
    > New Windows - Don't Wait For Longhorn! http://snipurl.com/newwin
     
    Daniel, May 11, 2004
    #18
  19. Daniel wrote:

    > "Blinky the Shark" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Daniel wrote:


    >> > "Blinky the Shark" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:...


    >> >> I like the Antec TruPower series.


    >> > After the reading of those other articles, I'm getting the Antec

    > True330.


    >> Enjoy.


    > I don't have the need yet for a 380 (in the links that were listed),
    > so going with the 330. Also looks like someone on NewEgg doesn't know
    > much about power supplies & was overloading theirs or was using the
    > wrong voltage input setting or something (fried 2 replacements + the
    > original...after 3 bad of anything, I'd be thinking it is NOT the
    > product).


    Yeah, that sounds like a bigger problem than his power supply.

    My bud's got a 330 or a 380; it's been fine. I have a 480, because
    I was thinking about future needs, and I'd like to use this one for a
    while, and I run AMDs.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 4892F
    AOL Diary http://snipurl.com/aoldiary
    Nigerian Scam From Space http://snipurl.com/iss419
    New Windows - Don't Wait For Longhorn! http://snipurl.com/newwin
     
    Blinky the Shark, May 12, 2004
    #19
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