Replacing BIOS in Sony Laptop - Possible? Does anyone do it?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by j2696@boardermail.com, Apr 1, 2004.

  1. Guest

    I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220. It originally came installed with
    Windows ME. I wanted to upgrade it to WinXP. On Sony's website, they
    have a webpage with info on the laptop which says that certain
    components of the laptop can't be recognized by XP unless the BIOS is
    appropriately updated. So I downloaded their BIOS update for XP and
    ran it as per their instructions.

    It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof...the
    computer just turned off. Now when I hit the power button, nothing
    happens. The power light goes on and I see the CD-ROM light go on for
    a second, but the computer will neither boot from a CD nor a Floppy.
    Holding down/pressing keys doesn't do anything.

    Sony quoted me $699 to replace the entire motherboard even if just the
    BIOS is dead (it's out of warranty)...considering I can get a whole
    new (and better) notebook for that amount, that's obviously out of the
    question.

    The cheapest I could find someone to replace the Motherboard for was
    $250, and it's for a refurbished Motherboard.

    Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    Motherboard.

    Is this possible? Does any place do this?
     
    , Apr 1, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Palindrome Guest

    wrote:

    > I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220. It originally came installed with
    > Windows ME. I wanted to upgrade it to WinXP. On Sony's website, they
    > have a webpage with info on the laptop which says that certain
    > components of the laptop can't be recognized by XP unless the BIOS is
    > appropriately updated. So I downloaded their BIOS update for XP and
    > ran it as per their instructions.
    >
    > It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof...the
    > computer just turned off. Now when I hit the power button, nothing
    > happens. The power light goes on and I see the CD-ROM light go on for
    > a second, but the computer will neither boot from a CD nor a Floppy.
    > Holding down/pressing keys doesn't do anything.
    >
    > Sony quoted me $699 to replace the entire motherboard even if just the
    > BIOS is dead (it's out of warranty)...considering I can get a whole
    > new (and better) notebook for that amount, that's obviously out of the
    > question.
    >
    > The cheapest I could find someone to replace the Motherboard for was
    > $250, and it's for a refurbished Motherboard.
    >
    > Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    > actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    > Motherboard.
    >
    > Is this possible? Does any place do this?



    The BIOS may easily be socketed. It is on my, albeit slightly earlier,
    model. In which case changing it only needs part of a paperclip and a
    bit of patience.

    On a laptop from a different Japanese manufacturer, I found that the
    BIOS chips were sold within Japan but not outside. It may be worth
    investigating whether the same applies to Sony.

    If it is soldered in place it will certainly be a surface mount type
    which demands specialist skills in desoldering and resoldering. You
    might want to try the electronics department of your local university; a
    technician there may do it for you for not a lot. He/She should also be
    able to copy data onto the existing one, even perhaps in situ. You would
    need a good chip to read from though - but only the loan of one! Know
    anyone else with the same model?

    If your laptop is insured against accidentla damage, it may be covered.
    After all, you didn't damage it deliberately, did you?

    The most common failure of laptops remains damage to the screen (and if
    you think Sony were asking a lot for the mainboard, see what they would
    want for the screen) - so you may be able to advertise for and get one
    with a damaged screen for peanuts. That is probably where the
    "refurbished" board comes from. Swapping the socketed chip, the screen
    or the mobo is something any electronics mechanic can do.


    Best of luck! Hope some of this helps a little.
     
    Palindrome, Apr 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. On Thu, 01 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, j2696 wrote:

    > I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220. It originally came installed with
    > Windows ME. I wanted to upgrade it to WinXP. On Sony's website, they
    > have a webpage with info on the laptop which says that certain
    > components of the laptop can't be recognized by XP unless the BIOS is
    > appropriately updated. So I downloaded their BIOS update for XP and
    > ran it as per their instructions.
    >
    > It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof...the
    > computer just turned off. Now when I hit the power button, nothing
    > happens. The power light goes on and I see the CD-ROM light go on for
    > a second, but the computer will neither boot from a CD nor a Floppy.
    > Holding down/pressing keys doesn't do anything.
    >
    > Sony quoted me $699 to replace the entire motherboard even if just the
    > BIOS is dead (it's out of warranty)...considering I can get a whole
    > new (and better) notebook for that amount, that's obviously out of the
    > question.
    >
    > The cheapest I could find someone to replace the Motherboard for was
    > $250, and it's for a refurbished Motherboard.
    >
    > Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    > actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    > Motherboard.


    Do you have, or know anyone who has, the facilities for SMT ?

    > Is this possible? Does any place do this?


    It's unlikely that Sony would supply a pre-programmed BIOS chip, to an
    end user.

    One possible option I can think of would be to, obtain the required blank
    Flash-device, the find someone with the appropriate Flash-programmer for
    the BIOS chip, and program that chip with the BIOS image that you
    downloaded. And then solder the new programmed chip into the mainboard.

    --
    Michael Turner
    Email (ROT13)
     
    michael turner, Apr 1, 2004
    #3
  4. Sano Guest

    Palindrome has the idea.

    I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on a full
    size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in a case
    to lean my arm on.

    There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I don't
    have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously your's would
    have to be socketed.

    Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix had other
    issues.

    Sooo, what I'm saying:

    If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that boots, with
    the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got nothing to
    lose.

    Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one. US$35+ or
    so.

    On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:

    > I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220.


    > It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof.


    > Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    > actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    > Motherboard.
    >
    > Is this possible? Does any place do this?
     
    Sano, Apr 2, 2004
    #4
  5. Millimeter Guest

    On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:

    >Palindrome has the idea.
    >
    >I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on a full
    >size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in a case
    >to lean my arm on.
    >
    >There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I don't
    >have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously your's would
    >have to be socketed.
    >
    >Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix had other
    >issues.
    >
    >Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >
    >If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that boots, with
    >the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got nothing to
    >lose.
    >
    >Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one. US$35+ or
    >so.
    >
    >On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:
    >
    >> I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220.

    >
    >> It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof.

    >
    >> Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    >> actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    >> Motherboard.
    >>
    >> Is this possible? Does any place do this?


    I knew that IBM was bringing out a Hot Swappable power supply for
    their servers to reduce network down time but I didn't know you could
    do surgery at the chip level while the box was still live.

    Millimeter
     
    Millimeter, Apr 2, 2004
    #5
  6. VooDoo Guest

    Millimeter wrote:

    > On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Palindrome has the idea.
    >>
    >>I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on a full
    >>size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in a case
    >>to lean my arm on.
    >>
    >>There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I don't
    >>have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously your's would
    >>have to be socketed.
    >>
    >>Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >>chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >>version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix had other
    >>issues.
    >>
    >>Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>
    >>If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that boots, with
    >>the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got nothing to
    >>lose.
    >>
    >>Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one. US$35+ or
    >>so.
    >>
    >>On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220.

    >>
    >>>It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof.

    >>
    >>>Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    >>>actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    >>>Motherboard.
    >>>
    >>>Is this possible? Does any place do this?

    >
    >
    > I knew that IBM was bringing out a Hot Swappable power supply for
    > their servers to reduce network down time but I didn't know you could
    > do surgery at the chip level while the box was still live.
    >
    > Millimeter
    >

    I don't think palindrome knows what "hot-swap" means.
     
    VooDoo, Apr 2, 2004
    #6
  7. Palindrome Guest

    Millimeter wrote:

    > On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Palindrome has the idea.
    >>
    >>I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on a full
    >>size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in a case
    >>to lean my arm on.
    >>
    >>There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I don't
    >>have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously your's would
    >>have to be socketed.
    >>
    >>Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >>chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >>version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix had other
    >>issues.
    >>
    >>Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>
    >>If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that boots, with
    >>the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got nothing to
    >>lose.
    >>
    >>Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one. US$35+ or
    >>so.
    >>
    >>On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220.

    >>
    >>>It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof.

    >>
    >>>Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    >>>actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    >>>Motherboard.
    >>>
    >>>Is this possible? Does any place do this?

    >
    >
    > I knew that IBM was bringing out a Hot Swappable power supply for
    > their servers to reduce network down time but I didn't know you could
    > do surgery at the chip level while the box was still live.
    >
    > Millimeter
    >

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~never heard of a FLASH ROM? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    (followed by bang and fizzle) ;)
     
    Palindrome, Apr 2, 2004
    #7
  8. Palindrome Guest

    VooDoo wrote:

    > Millimeter wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Palindrome has the idea.
    >>>
    >>> I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on a
    >>> full
    >>> size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in a
    >>> case
    >>> to lean my arm on.
    >>>
    >>> There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I don't
    >>> have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously your's
    >>> would
    >>> have to be socketed.
    >>>
    >>> Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>> reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >>> chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>> reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >>> version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix had
    >>> other
    >>> issues.
    >>>
    >>> Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>>
    >>> If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that
    >>> boots, with
    >>> the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got
    >>> nothing to
    >>> lose.
    >>>
    >>> Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one.
    >>> US$35+ or
    >>> so.
    >>>
    >>> On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    >>>> actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    >>>> Motherboard.
    >>>>
    >>>> Is this possible? Does any place do this?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I knew that IBM was bringing out a Hot Swappable power supply for
    >> their servers to reduce network down time but I didn't know you could
    >> do surgery at the chip level while the box was still live.
    >>
    >> Millimeter
    >>

    > I don't think palindrome knows what "hot-swap" means.


    I don't think you know how to read threads. I (Palindrome) never
    mentioned hot swapping. You going to apologise?
     
    Palindrome, Apr 2, 2004
    #8
  9. VooDoo Guest

    Palindrome wrote:

    > VooDoo wrote:
    >
    >> Millimeter wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Palindrome has the idea.
    >>>>
    >>>> I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on a
    >>>> full
    >>>> size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in a
    >>>> case
    >>>> to lean my arm on.
    >>>>
    >>>> There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I don't
    >>>> have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously your's
    >>>> would
    >>>> have to be socketed.
    >>>>
    >>>> Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>>> reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >>>> chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>>> reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >>>> version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix had
    >>>> other
    >>>> issues.
    >>>>
    >>>> Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>>>
    >>>> If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that
    >>>> boots, with
    >>>> the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got
    >>>> nothing to
    >>>> lose.
    >>>>
    >>>> Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one.
    >>>> US$35+ or
    >>>> so.
    >>>>
    >>>> On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    >>>>> actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    >>>>> Motherboard.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Is this possible? Does any place do this?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I knew that IBM was bringing out a Hot Swappable power supply for
    >>> their servers to reduce network down time but I didn't know you could
    >>> do surgery at the chip level while the box was still live.
    >>>
    >>> Millimeter
    >>>

    >> I don't think palindrome knows what "hot-swap" means.

    >
    >
    > I don't think you know how to read threads. I (Palindrome) never
    > mentioned hot swapping. You going to apologise?


    No. Because you're a liar. It was the fourth word in your original
    reply. You even highlighted it with stars ya big dummy!
     
    VooDoo, Apr 2, 2004
    #9
  10. VooDoo Guest

    VooDoo wrote:

    > Palindrome wrote:
    >
    >> VooDoo wrote:
    >>
    >>> Millimeter wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Palindrome has the idea.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on
    >>>>> a full
    >>>>> size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in
    >>>>> a case
    >>>>> to lean my arm on.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I
    >>>>> don't
    >>>>> have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously
    >>>>> your's would
    >>>>> have to be socketed.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>>>> reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >>>>> chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>>>> reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >>>>> version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix
    >>>>> had other
    >>>>> issues.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that
    >>>>> boots, with
    >>>>> the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got
    >>>>> nothing to
    >>>>> lose.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one.
    >>>>> US$35+ or
    >>>>> so.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    >>>>>> actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    >>>>>> Motherboard.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Is this possible? Does any place do this?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I knew that IBM was bringing out a Hot Swappable power supply for
    >>>> their servers to reduce network down time but I didn't know you could
    >>>> do surgery at the chip level while the box was still live.
    >>>>
    >>>> Millimeter
    >>>>
    >>> I don't think palindrome knows what "hot-swap" means.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I don't think you know how to read threads. I (Palindrome) never
    >> mentioned hot swapping. You going to apologise?

    >
    >
    > No. Because you're a liar. It was the fourth word in your original
    > reply. You even highlighted it with stars ya big dummy!



    Oops! Sorry! Sano is the big dummy, not Palindrome. Add me to the big
    dummy list as well!!! My bad!
     
    VooDoo, Apr 2, 2004
    #10
  11. Palindrome Guest

    VooDoo wrote:

    > Palindrome wrote:
    >
    >> VooDoo wrote:
    >>
    >>> Millimeter wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Palindrome has the idea.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on
    >>>>> a full
    >>>>> size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in
    >>>>> a case
    >>>>> to lean my arm on.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I
    >>>>> don't
    >>>>> have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously
    >>>>> your's would
    >>>>> have to be socketed.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>>>> reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >>>>> chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>>>> reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >>>>> version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix
    >>>>> had other
    >>>>> issues.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that
    >>>>> boots, with
    >>>>> the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got
    >>>>> nothing to
    >>>>> lose.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one.
    >>>>> US$35+ or
    >>>>> so.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    >>>>>> actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    >>>>>> Motherboard.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Is this possible? Does any place do this?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I knew that IBM was bringing out a Hot Swappable power supply for
    >>>> their servers to reduce network down time but I didn't know you could
    >>>> do surgery at the chip level while the box was still live.
    >>>>
    >>>> Millimeter
    >>>>
    >>> I don't think palindrome knows what "hot-swap" means.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I don't think you know how to read threads. I (Palindrome) never
    >> mentioned hot swapping. You going to apologise?

    >
    >
    > No. Because you're a liar. It was the fourth word in your original
    > reply. You even highlighted it with stars ya big dummy!


    It was the fourth word in Sano's reply not mine.

    My original reply started:

    "The BIOS may easily be socketed. It is on my, albeit slightly earlier,
    model. In which case changing it only needs part of a paperclip and a
    bit of patience. "

    It was to that that Sano replied with the highlighted text.

    So, now, are you going to aplogise abjectly for maligning me?

    As I said, correctly, you can't read threads can you?
     
    Palindrome, Apr 2, 2004
    #11
  12. Palindrome Guest

    VooDoo wrote:

    <snip various amusing bits about hot swopping BIOS chips>
    > Oops! Sorry! Sano is the big dummy, not Palindrome. Add me to the big
    > dummy list as well!!! My bad!


    Apology accepted ;)
     
    Palindrome, Apr 2, 2004
    #12
  13. Sano Guest

    On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 13:43:51 GMT, VooDoo wrote:

    > VooDoo wrote:
    >
    >> Palindrome wrote:
    >>
    >>> VooDoo wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Millimeter wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Palindrome has the idea.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on
    >>>>>> a full
    >>>>>> size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in
    >>>>>> a case
    >>>>>> to lean my arm on.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I
    >>>>>> don't
    >>>>>> have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously
    >>>>>> your's would
    >>>>>> have to be socketed.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>>>>> reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >>>>>> chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>>>>> reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >>>>>> version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix
    >>>>>> had other
    >>>>>> issues.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that
    >>>>>> boots, with
    >>>>>> the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got
    >>>>>> nothing to
    >>>>>> lose.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one.
    >>>>>> US$35+ or
    >>>>>> so.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:


    > Oops! Sorry! Sano is the big dummy, not Palindrome. Add me to the big
    > dummy list as well!!! My bad!


    Have you even had a cover off?

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=bios hot flash
     
    Sano, Apr 2, 2004
    #13
  14. VooDoo Guest

    Sano wrote:

    > On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 13:43:51 GMT, VooDoo wrote:
    >
    >
    >>VooDoo wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Palindrome wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>VooDoo wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Millimeter wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Palindrome has the idea.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on
    >>>>>>>a full
    >>>>>>>size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in
    >>>>>>>a case
    >>>>>>>to lean my arm on.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I
    >>>>>>>don't
    >>>>>>>have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously
    >>>>>>>your's would
    >>>>>>>have to be socketed.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>>>>>>reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >>>>>>>chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>>>>>>reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >>>>>>>version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix
    >>>>>>>had other
    >>>>>>>issues.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that
    >>>>>>>boots, with
    >>>>>>>the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got
    >>>>>>>nothing to
    >>>>>>>lose.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one.
    >>>>>>>US$35+ or
    >>>>>>>so.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:

    >
    >
    >>Oops! Sorry! Sano is the big dummy, not Palindrome. Add me to the big
    >>dummy list as well!!! My bad!

    >
    >
    > Have you even had a cover off?
    >
    > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=bios hot flash


    Now you're backpeddling saying "Hot Flash", when you originally said
    *Hot Swap*.

    What do you mean by cover? Are you referring to a computer 'case'? Or
    are you referring to your vast experience in RAM upgrades hence removing
    the memory module 'cover'?

    Hack
     
    VooDoo, Apr 2, 2004
    #14
  15. Palindrome Guest

    VooDoo wrote:

    > Sano wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 13:43:51 GMT, VooDoo wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> VooDoo wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Palindrome wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> VooDoo wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Millimeter wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Palindrome has the idea.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it,
    >>>>>>>> on a full
    >>>>>>>> size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo
    >>>>>>>> in a case
    >>>>>>>> to lean my arm on.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google,
    >>>>>>>> I don't
    >>>>>>>> have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously
    >>>>>>>> your's would
    >>>>>>>> have to be socketed.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>>>>>>> reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same
    >>>>>>>> style
    >>>>>>>> chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>>>>>>> reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the
    >>>>>>>> bios and
    >>>>>>>> version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix
    >>>>>>>> had other
    >>>>>>>> issues.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that
    >>>>>>>> boots, with
    >>>>>>>> the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got
    >>>>>>>> nothing to
    >>>>>>>> lose.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one.
    >>>>>>>> US$35+ or
    >>>>>>>> so.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> Oops! Sorry! Sano is the big dummy, not Palindrome. Add me to the big
    >>> dummy list as well!!! My bad!

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Have you even had a cover off?
    >>
    >> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=bios hot flash

    >
    >
    > Now you're backpeddling saying "Hot Flash", when you originally said
    > *Hot Swap*.
    >
    > What do you mean by cover? Are you referring to a computer 'case'? Or
    > are you referring to your vast experience in RAM upgrades hence removing
    > the memory module 'cover'?
    >
    > Hack


    Of course, if you do try to hot swap a flash prom, you do stand a very
    good chance of removing its cover. :) And reading the chip label is so
    much easier after it has transferred itself into a burn imprssion on the
    finger. I think the writer of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom had
    similar ideas..
     
    Palindrome, Apr 2, 2004
    #15
  16. Sano Guest

    On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 19:30:49 GMT, VooDoo wrote:

    > Sano wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 13:43:51 GMT, VooDoo wrote:


    >>>VooDoo wrote:


    >>>>Palindrome wrote:
    >>>>>VooDoo wrote:


    >>>>>>Millimeter wrote:
    >>>>>>>On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:


    >> Have you even had a cover off?
    >>
    >> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=bios hot flash

    >
    > Now you're backpeddling saying "Hot Flash", when you originally said
    > *Hot Swap*.
    >
    > What do you mean by cover? Are you referring to a computer 'case'? Or
    > are you referring to your vast experience in RAM upgrades hence removing
    > the memory module 'cover'?
    >
    > Hack


    What are you on about? Your head now seems firmly embedded in your ass.

    I don't give a flying crap what you call it.
     
    Sano, Apr 2, 2004
    #16
  17. Millimeter Guest

    On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 11:41:51 -0500, Sano <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 13:43:51 GMT, VooDoo wrote:
    >
    >> VooDoo wrote:
    >>
    >>> Palindrome wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> VooDoo wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Millimeter wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Palindrome has the idea.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on
    >>>>>>> a full
    >>>>>>> size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in
    >>>>>>> a case
    >>>>>>> to lean my arm on.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I
    >>>>>>> don't
    >>>>>>> have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously
    >>>>>>> your's would
    >>>>>>> have to be socketed.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>>>>>> reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >>>>>>> chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>>>>>> reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >>>>>>> version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix
    >>>>>>> had other
    >>>>>>> issues.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that
    >>>>>>> boots, with
    >>>>>>> the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got
    >>>>>>> nothing to
    >>>>>>> lose.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one.
    >>>>>>> US$35+ or
    >>>>>>> so.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:

    >
    >> Oops! Sorry! Sano is the big dummy, not Palindrome. Add me to the big
    >> dummy list as well!!! My bad!

    >
    >Have you even had a cover off?
    >
    >http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=bios hot flash



    If you actually read this article all the way through...
    Near the bottom of the page, just after congratulating Dan on a good
    job, we see a thumb pushing in a chip. The ver next sentence reads
    "With the PC shutdown, I located the chip socket and the errant chip."

    So yes you can hot-flash the bios, but no you cannot hot-swap a chip.

    Hope this clears things up a bit,
    Millimeter
     
    Millimeter, Apr 3, 2004
    #17
  18. Millimeter Guest

    On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 14:29:27 +0100, Palindrome <> wrote:

    >Millimeter wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 2 Apr 2004 04:41:06 -0500, Sano <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Palindrome has the idea.
    >>>
    >>>I just successfully *hot swapped* a bios chip and reflashed it, on a full
    >>>size atx mobo. Good light, steady hands, and I mounted the mobo in a case
    >>>to lean my arm on.
    >>>
    >>>There are several good sites describing the technique. (Google, I don't
    >>>have anything at hand). I've had few laptops apart, obviously your's would
    >>>have to be socketed.
    >>>
    >>>Mine was one of the longish, rectangular chips, 2mb. I also tried
    >>>reflashing, a good while ago, on another board that had the same style
    >>>chip, but was a 1mb. That might have also been successful, because
    >>>reflashing it a couple of days ago, the loader recognized the bios and
    >>>version. It turns out now that the orig mobo I was trying to fix had other
    >>>issues.
    >>>
    >>>Sooo, what I'm saying:
    >>>
    >>>If the laptop has a socketed chip, find another good board that boots, with
    >>>the same chip style, and try the hot swap technique. You've got nothing to
    >>>lose.
    >>>
    >>>Or there are vendors that sell loaded chips. Mr.Bios may be one. US$35+ or
    >>>so.
    >>>
    >>>On 1 Apr 2004 14:19:38 -0800, wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I have a Sony Laptop PCG-FX220.
    >>>
    >>>>It was in the middle of saying it was "updating" when poof.
    >>>
    >>>>Now I am wondering if it's possible to just replace the BIOS. I mean
    >>>>actually unsoldering the BIOS chip and soldering a new one onto the
    >>>>Motherboard.
    >>>>
    >>>>Is this possible? Does any place do this?

    >>
    >>
    >> I knew that IBM was bringing out a Hot Swappable power supply for
    >> their servers to reduce network down time but I didn't know you could
    >> do surgery at the chip level while the box was still live.
    >>
    >> Millimeter
    >>

    >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~never heard of a FLASH ROM? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    >(followed by bang and fizzle) ;)


    As I mentioned in an earlier reply, flashing the Bios would have to be
    hot because you need the power on to run a program which flashing is.

    AFAIK, chip level mechanics require you to power off.
    Millimeter
     
    Millimeter, Apr 3, 2004
    #18
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