Replacement PSU for D-Link - Amperage rating question.

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lodi, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. Lodi

    Lodi Guest

    Hi all...My D-Link router power supply pack died. Nearly four years of
    24/7-ish use so I can't complain.

    Just googling around for a replacement unit. The dead unit is rated 5V 2.0A

    D-Link support apparently recommend a MP3140 which is rated 5V 2.5A
    http://tinyurl.com/n742mb

    The nearest Jaycars do is MP3480 which is rated 5V 3.0A
    http://tinyurl.com/nhkzsr

    There is a switchable power supply unit (3v-12v @ 2.5V) but it's way too
    expensive. $60-ish.

    Is the difference between the original 5V 2.0A and a likely replacement of
    5V 3.0A acceptable. I thought less resistance was a good thing.

    Regards
    Lodi
    Lodi, Jul 28, 2009
    #1
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  2. Lodi

    Squiggle Guest

    Lodi wrote:
    > Hi all...My D-Link router power supply pack died. Nearly four years of
    > 24/7-ish use so I can't complain.
    >
    > Just googling around for a replacement unit. The dead unit is rated 5V 2.0A
    >
    > D-Link support apparently recommend a MP3140 which is rated 5V 2.5A
    > http://tinyurl.com/n742mb
    >
    > The nearest Jaycars do is MP3480 which is rated 5V 3.0A
    > http://tinyurl.com/nhkzsr
    >
    > There is a switchable power supply unit (3v-12v @ 2.5V) but it's way too
    > expensive. $60-ish.
    >
    > Is the difference between the original 5V 2.0A and a likely replacement of
    > 5V 3.0A acceptable. I thought less resistance was a good thing.
    >
    > Regards
    > Lodi
    >


    The Jaycar supply is not only acceptable, but also could be considered
    an upgrade. Its able to supply 50% more current at the rated voltage.

    Just make sure that you get the Dc plug connected the right way round in
    case Dlink did not reverse polarity protect the router.
    Squiggle, Jul 28, 2009
    #2
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  3. On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 21:19:19 +1200, Lodi <> wrote in
    <news:h4mg79$irv$-september.org>:

    > Hi all...My D-Link router power supply pack died. Nearly four years of
    > 24/7-ish use so I can't complain.
    >
    > Just googling around for a replacement unit. The dead unit is rated 5V 2.0A
    >
    > D-Link support apparently recommend a MP3140 which is rated 5V 2.5A
    > http://tinyurl.com/n742mb
    >
    > The nearest Jaycars do is MP3480 which is rated 5V 3.0A
    > http://tinyurl.com/nhkzsr
    >
    > There is a switchable power supply unit (3v-12v @ 2.5V) but it's way too
    > expensive. $60-ish.
    >
    > Is the difference between the original 5V 2.0A and a likely replacement of
    > 5V 3.0A acceptable. I thought less resistance was a good thing.
    >
    > Regards
    > Lodi


    The Jaycar MP3480 with its 3A rating would be perfectly acceptable - in fact
    a better option, perhaps, than the original which, at a 2A rating, might
    have been slicing it a bit thin. The router will draw only as much current
    as it needs.

    --
    - Nicolaas
    Nicolaas Hawkins, Jul 28, 2009
    #3
  4. Lodi

    peterwn Guest

    On Jul 28, 9:19 pm, Lodi <> wrote:
    > Hi all...My D-Link router power supply pack died. Nearly four years of
    > 24/7-ish use so I can't complain.
    >
    > Just googling around for a replacement unit. The dead unit is rated 5V 2.0A
    >
    > D-Link support apparently recommend a MP3140 which is rated 5V 2.5Ahttp://tinyurl.com/n742mb
    >
    > The nearest Jaycars do is MP3480 which is rated 5V 3.0Ahttp://tinyurl.com/nhkzsr
    >
    > There is a switchable power supply unit (3v-12v @ 2.5V) but it's way too
    > expensive. $60-ish.
    >
    > Is the difference between the original 5V 2.0A and a likely replacement of
    > 5V 3.0A acceptable. I thought less resistance was a good thing.
    >
    > Regards
    > Lodi


    Unless there are very peculiar and unusual circumstances, the 3.0A
    unit should work just fine. The amperage of a replacement unit should
    be at least that recommended by the equipment manufacturer.
    Presumably the dead 2.0A unit was not the original one supplied, or
    the manufacturer found that the 2.0A ones were too 'tight' especially
    in tropical conditions where high ambient temperatures puts extra
    stress on the transformers (example, in the power business I was quite
    happy for a pole transformer to be 50% overloaded on a cold wet windy
    night).
    peterwn, Jul 28, 2009
    #4
  5. Lodi

    Richard Guest

    peterwn wrote:

    > Unless there are very peculiar and unusual circumstances, the 3.0A
    > unit should work just fine. The amperage of a replacement unit should
    > be at least that recommended by the equipment manufacturer.


    Dlink used the same 2.5a adapter across a load of products, I measured
    my router as only taking 1.5 max during boot - infact one with a usb
    port also only had a 2.5 despite powering the USB on it.

    > Presumably the dead 2.0A unit was not the original one supplied, or
    > the manufacturer found that the 2.0A ones were too 'tight' especially
    > in tropical conditions where high ambient temperatures puts extra
    > stress on the transformers (example, in the power business I was quite
    > happy for a pole transformer to be 50% overloaded on a cold wet windy
    > night).


    I think the ones in united network must be permanently overloaded since
    the one in the street here is only 200kva and there are probably over 70
    houses on it. Is that quoted per phase? May be ok if thats the case.
    Richard, Jul 28, 2009
    #5
  6. On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 21:19:19 +1200, Lodi <> wrote:

    >Hi all...My D-Link router power supply pack died. Nearly four years of
    >24/7-ish use so I can't complain.


    Uh - why can't you complain? Why should you accept that a power
    supply dies after only 4 years? It should not have. It was probably
    the victim of bad capacitors, which were seriously bad design
    decisions. So maybe they should be replacing it under the CGA.
    Stephen Worthington, Jul 28, 2009
    #6
  7. Lodi

    Lodi Guest

    > Stephen Worthington wrote:

    > On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 21:19:19 +1200, Lodi <> wrote:
    >
    >>Hi all...My D-Link router power supply pack died. Nearly four years of
    >>24/7-ish use so I can't complain.

    >
    > Uh - why can't you complain? Why should you accept that a power
    > supply dies after only 4 years? It should not have. It was probably
    > the victim of bad capacitors, which were seriously bad design
    > decisions. So maybe they should be replacing it under the CGA.


    Hi Stephen....I've had things break down on me by just casting a casual
    glance in their direction. It's one of the few talents I have. Four years
    from a piece of kit deserves a medal :)

    To all who replied, many thanks. It's refreshing to see knowledge being
    passed on instead of another OS flame thread.

    Regards
    Lodi
    Lodi, Jul 28, 2009
    #7
  8. Lodi

    peterwn Guest

    On Jul 28, 10:33 pm, Richard <> wrote:
    (example, in the power business I was quite
    > > happy for a pole transformer to be 50% overloaded on a cold wet windy
    > > night).

    >
    > I think the ones in united network must be permanently overloaded since
    > the one in the street here is only 200kva and there are probably over 70
    > houses on it. Is that quoted per phase? May be ok if thats the case.


    No it is 200kva across 3 phases ie 67kva per phase - good as kw as
    power factor is pretty well unity at peak load in domestic areas.
    200kva seems ample for 70 houses especially if some are on gas, 150kva
    would probably do at a pinch. There is alot of diversity between
    houses eg some people may have gone out at peak load time.
    peterwn, Jul 29, 2009
    #8
  9. Lodi

    Simon Guest

    On Jul 29, 2:22 am, Stephen Worthington
    <34.nz56.remove_numbers> wrote:
    > On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 21:19:19 +1200, Lodi <> wrote:
    > >Hi all...My D-Link router power supply pack died. Nearly four years of
    > >24/7-ish use so I can't complain.

    > Uh - why can't you complain?  Why should you accept that a power
    > supply dies after only 4 years?  It should not have.  It was probably
    > the victim of bad capacitors, which were seriously bad design
    > decisions.  So maybe they should be replacing it under the CGA.


    For a non enterprise-class device, costing SFA, operating under 24/7
    in non-optimal conditions (typically a cupboard, a basement etc.
    probably without a UPS) lasting 4 years seems quite reasonable to me.
    Simon, Jul 29, 2009
    #9
  10. On Wed, 29 Jul 2009 15:33:02 -0700 (PDT), Simon <>
    wrote:

    >On Jul 29, 2:22 am, Stephen Worthington
    ><34.nz56.remove_numbers> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 21:19:19 +1200, Lodi <> wrote:
    >> >Hi all...My D-Link router power supply pack died. Nearly four years of
    >> >24/7-ish use so I can't complain.

    >> Uh - why can't you complain?  Why should you accept that a power
    >> supply dies after only 4 years?  It should not have.  It was probably
    >> the victim of bad capacitors, which were seriously bad design
    >> decisions.  So maybe they should be replacing it under the CGA.

    >
    >For a non enterprise-class device, costing SFA, operating under 24/7
    >in non-optimal conditions (typically a cupboard, a basement etc.
    >probably without a UPS) lasting 4 years seems quite reasonable to me.


    But why? Why should people expect such a short lifetime? It is not
    hard to design a power supply right so that it lasts and lasts. A
    very large proportion of the failures of electronic equipment recently
    after only a short lifetime can be traced back to the use of
    capacitors that fail after a very short working life. I would hope
    that no manufacturer will still be using such capacitors - if they
    are, then a failure of one is clearly a design fault on their part and
    they should replace the equipment under the CGA. Without the bad
    capacitors, then we get back to the traditional reasons for things
    failing of old age, such as dry joints, or values of components
    shifting a little with age. Those things typically take much longer.
    I would certainly expect an absolute minimum of 7 years of operation
    for a power supply, and any wholly electronic equipment.
    Stephen Worthington, Jul 30, 2009
    #10
  11. Lodi

    grum Guest

    Stephen Worthington wrote:

    >
    > But why? Why should people expect such a short lifetime? It is not
    > hard to design a power supply right so that it lasts and lasts. A
    > very large proportion of the failures of electronic equipment recently
    > after only a short lifetime can be traced back to the use of
    > capacitors that fail after a very short working life. I would hope
    > that no manufacturer will still be using such capacitors - if they
    > are, then a failure of one is clearly a design fault on their part and
    > they should replace the equipment under the CGA. Without the bad
    > capacitors, then we get back to the traditional reasons for things
    > failing of old age, such as dry joints, or values of components
    > shifting a little with age. Those things typically take much longer.
    > I would certainly expect an absolute minimum of 7 years of operation
    > for a power supply, and any wholly electronic equipment.


    Totally agree. We are being brainwashed into believing that things
    failing after a 3 or 4 years is normal, or at least "not our (i.e.
    manufacturer's) problem". Bollocks. My house is full of 20 year old
    electronics that is still working perfectly. And some examples of more
    recent stuff that has crapped out before it should. After some recent
    positive (eventually) experiences staring down retailers while armed
    with the CGA in my hand, I'm getting much more aggressive in doing my
    bit to raise the level of expectation around how long stuff should last.
    And whose problem it is when it doesn't.
    Grumpy bastard.
    grum, Jul 30, 2009
    #11
  12. Lodi

    Simon Guest

    On Jul 30, 12:39 pm, Stephen Worthington
    <34.nz56.remove_numbers> wrote:

    > But why?  Why should people expect such a short lifetime?  It is not
    > hard to design a power supply right so that it lasts and lasts.  A
    > very large proportion of the failures of electronic equipment recently
    > after only a short lifetime can be traced back to the use of
    > capacitors that fail after a very short working life.  I would hope
    > that no manufacturer will still be using such capacitors - if they
    > are, then a failure of one is clearly a design fault on their part and
    > they should replace the equipment under the CGA.  Without the bad
    > capacitors, then we get back to the traditional reasons for things
    > failing of old age, such as dry joints, or values of components
    > shifting a little with age.  Those things typically take much longer.
    > I would certainly expect an absolute minimum of 7 years of operation
    > for a power supply, and any wholly electronic equipment.



    I agree. There's no technical reason why these devices need to fail so
    quickly, however I believe at least part of the problem is that
    consumers have demanded lower and lower prices. Manufacturers, having
    reduced labour costs significantly (by shifting production to China
    and India for example) have eventually had to compromise on quality in
    order to continue the downward pressure on prices.

    Many of the rather old pieces of electronic equipment I own dating
    back to the 1980's such as my Apple IIe, still run just fine.
    Simon, Jul 30, 2009
    #12
  13. Lodi

    peterwn Guest

    On Jul 30, 12:39 pm, Stephen Worthington
    <34.nz56.remove_numbers> wrote:
     Without the bad
    > capacitors, then we get back to the traditional reasons for things
    > failing of old age, such as dry joints, or values of components
    > shifting a little with age.  Those things typically take much longer.
    > I would certainly expect an absolute minimum of 7 years of operation
    > for a power supply, and any wholly electronic equipment.


    Sometimes there is a need for a 40 year life such as electrics
    associated with pipe organs in churches etc. In one such case a 13.8
    volt (tweaked up to 15v) 30amp power supply has been giving trouble
    service for 28 years. Admittedly it is on only several hours per
    week.

    My scanner power supply failed after 13 months. By the time I got to
    the top of the food chain and was muttering 'disputes tribunal' they
    found a suitable one in their 'spares' box and honour was restored all
    round.
    peterwn, Jul 30, 2009
    #13
  14. Lodi

    Richard Guest

    Woger wrote:

    > Its very easy to crack these open and replace the needed parts, but the thing
    > that some times goes and not easy to fix is the thermal fuse inside the
    > transformer windings...


    No its not, they are glued or welded closed, sometimes hidden screws
    which nessecitates removing stickers etc from it.

    Hardly easy to open in a way that preserves the item in a good
    condition. Perhaps you are ok having some ghetto looking plug thats held
    together with tape or whatever as a result.

    and I havent had anything come with a trasnformer poewr adapter for many
    years now... Other then a netgear router which did and was problematic.
    Richard, Aug 1, 2009
    #14
  15. Lodi

    Woger Guest

    On Sat, 01 Aug 2009 18:25:40 +1200, Richard <> wrote:

    >Woger wrote:
    >
    >> Its very easy to crack these open and replace the needed parts, but the thing
    >> that some times goes and not easy to fix is the thermal fuse inside the
    >> transformer windings...

    >
    >No its not, they are glued or welded closed, sometimes hidden screws
    >which nessecitates removing stickers etc from it.
    >
    >Hardly easy to open in a way that preserves the item in a good
    >condition. Perhaps you are ok having some ghetto looking plug thats held
    >together with tape or whatever as a result.
    >
    >and I havent had anything come with a trasnformer poewr adapter for many
    >years now... Other then a netgear router which did and was problematic.



    This standard service way of Doing it I have done it many many times , But the
    I am a fully trained Computer/Electronics service tech that knows what he is
    doing..
    Woger, Aug 1, 2009
    #15
  16. Lodi

    EMB Guest

    Woger wrote:
    > On Sat, 01 Aug 2009 18:25:40 +1200, Richard <> wrote:
    >
    >> Woger wrote:
    >>
    >>> Its very easy to crack these open and replace the needed parts, but the thing
    >>> that some times goes and not easy to fix is the thermal fuse inside the
    >>> transformer windings...

    >> No its not, they are glued or welded closed, sometimes hidden screws
    >> which nessecitates removing stickers etc from it.
    >>
    >> Hardly easy to open in a way that preserves the item in a good
    >> condition. Perhaps you are ok having some ghetto looking plug thats held
    >> together with tape or whatever as a result.
    >>
    >> and I havent had anything come with a trasnformer poewr adapter for many
    >> years now... Other then a netgear router which did and was problematic.

    >
    >
    > This standard service way of Doing it I have done it many many times , But the
    > I am a fully trained Computer/Electronics service tech that knows what he is
    > doing..


    And I'm sure you have vast amounts of experience with SMPSs.
    EMB, Aug 2, 2009
    #16
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