Repeated loss of Internet access

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Jeff, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    I connect to the internet through a 3 PC home wireless Network which
    connects to a WPA protected router and then a cable modem. Recently I've had
    an annoying problem on this one PC:

    The network is always OK in that I can see and access the other computers
    with no problem or interruption. However, on this XP SP2 laptop, I
    intermittently lose the ability to get to the internet. The wireless
    network has no problems from this laptop, but sometimes, after I have
    successfully connected to the internet (via the network), it no longer can
    find servers on the internet even though the "Wireless Network Connection"
    icon shows it to be connected. I can usually re-establish internet access
    by "viewing available wireless networks", disconnecting from the network
    (even though it shows it to be connected) and reconnecting again. This
    leaves me connected for a while and then I lose the internet again.

    Very annoying. What faulty setting should I be looking at?

    Thanks

    Jeff
    Jeff, Dec 28, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. are you connecting through a "Internet Gateway"?
    specifically 'Linux on IGD' \because i am having the same problem.

    when i take my laptop out and connect to other networks it's fine
    but through the network in my house i am having troubles.

    how can i disconnect this gateway ?
    it all started when i set up the wireless network between the computers in
    windows - for filesharing. no problems were had when using the lynksys
    routers.

    how to disonnect the network, the gateway anything...
    please help.
    i've tried a milion things to no avail.

    "Jeff" wrote:

    > I connect to the internet through a 3 PC home wireless Network which
    > connects to a WPA protected router and then a cable modem. Recently I've had
    > an annoying problem on this one PC:
    >
    > The network is always OK in that I can see and access the other computers
    > with no problem or interruption. However, on this XP SP2 laptop, I
    > intermittently lose the ability to get to the internet. The wireless
    > network has no problems from this laptop, but sometimes, after I have
    > successfully connected to the internet (via the network), it no longer can
    > find servers on the internet even though the "Wireless Network Connection"
    > icon shows it to be connected. I can usually re-establish internet access
    > by "viewing available wireless networks", disconnecting from the network
    > (even though it shows it to be connected) and reconnecting again. This
    > leaves me connected for a while and then I lose the internet again.
    >
    > Very annoying. What faulty setting should I be looking at?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Jeff
    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?ZGlyZ2U=?=, Dec 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    I am in Windows XP, not Linux. Awhile back I tried Linux and it would not
    even recognize my adapters.

    So this is entirely in Windows and worked fine till recently. I can't advise
    you because I too have tried everything and do not know why I am now having
    these problems.

    Jeff

    dirge wrote:
    > are you connecting through a "Internet Gateway"?
    > specifically 'Linux on IGD' \because i am having the same problem.
    >
    > when i take my laptop out and connect to other networks it's fine
    > but through the network in my house i am having troubles.
    >
    > how can i disconnect this gateway ?
    > it all started when i set up the wireless network between the
    > computers in windows - for filesharing. no problems were had when
    > using the lynksys routers.
    >
    > how to disonnect the network, the gateway anything...
    > please help.
    > i've tried a milion things to no avail.
    >
    > "Jeff" wrote:
    >
    >> I connect to the internet through a 3 PC home wireless Network which
    >> connects to a WPA protected router and then a cable modem. Recently
    >> I've had an annoying problem on this one PC:
    >>
    >> The network is always OK in that I can see and access the other
    >> computers with no problem or interruption. However, on this XP SP2
    >> laptop, I intermittently lose the ability to get to the internet.
    >> The wireless network has no problems from this laptop, but
    >> sometimes, after I have successfully connected to the internet (via
    >> the network), it no longer can find servers on the internet even
    >> though the "Wireless Network Connection" icon shows it to be
    >> connected. I can usually re-establish internet access by "viewing
    >> available wireless networks", disconnecting from the network (even
    >> though it shows it to be connected) and reconnecting again. This
    >> leaves me connected for a while and then I lose the internet again.
    >>
    >> Very annoying. What faulty setting should I be looking at?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >> Jeff
    Jeff, Dec 29, 2005
    #3
  4. Dirge and Jeff,

    Your problems sound exactly like what I have been experiencing as described
    a few posts back in "One computer out of four on network VERY slow" on
    December 27. The connection will be OK for a few minutes, but the ability to
    pull up web pages will be quickly lost ON ONE LAPTOP COMPUTER ONLY. The
    other laptops and desktop work fine with excellent Internet connectivity.
    The troublesome notebook will connect to his own home network or to any
    unsecured networks and/ or WiFi hotspots with no problems of all. But to my
    network, even with the correct WPA encryption code, he can indeed connect,
    and can pull up web pages, but only for a few minutes. Though the connection
    signal strength and throughput remains strong (or at least the on-screen
    indicators claim that it is strong), after just a few minutes download speed
    will drop to lower than dial-up. Not nonexistent, but just extremely slow.
    So far, it's a great mystery. Occasionally, we get an on-screen message that
    there is little or no connectivity and that Internet access might be poor.
    We get this message despite an indicator of 54 Mbps with maximum signal
    strength.
    =?Utf-8?B?QmlsbHlCb2I=?=, Dec 29, 2005
    #4
  5. I have had an almost identical problem with my wireless network since
    installing a Westell 327W. The connection was constantly up and down even
    though the Westell showed my connection to be good. With the help of tech
    support from my BellSouth FastAccess ISP, I just got it resolved today. They
    had me change my WEP key in the Westell from a 128 bit to a 64 bit key (10
    characters), and of course I had to change the WEP keys in my laptops to
    match. They say they often find Windows gets bogged down trying to encrypt
    at the 128 bit rate that it just gives up and quits. The symptoms sound
    almost identical to those you list in your postings, so if you have 128 bit
    WEP keys, you might want to try it. My connection has not gone down even one
    time since the change. And as a note, my old router only had lower bit rate
    encryption, and I never had this problem with it.

    "Jeff" wrote:

    > I connect to the internet through a 3 PC home wireless Network which
    > connects to a WPA protected router and then a cable modem. Recently I've had
    > an annoying problem on this one PC:
    >
    > The network is always OK in that I can see and access the other computers
    > with no problem or interruption. However, on this XP SP2 laptop, I
    > intermittently lose the ability to get to the internet. The wireless
    > network has no problems from this laptop, but sometimes, after I have
    > successfully connected to the internet (via the network), it no longer can
    > find servers on the internet even though the "Wireless Network Connection"
    > icon shows it to be connected. I can usually re-establish internet access
    > by "viewing available wireless networks", disconnecting from the network
    > (even though it shows it to be connected) and reconnecting again. This
    > leaves me connected for a while and then I lose the internet again.
    >
    > Very annoying. What faulty setting should I be looking at?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Jeff
    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?RGluZy1hLWxpbmdtYW4=?=, Dec 29, 2005
    #5
  6. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Dear BillyBob.

    That is an exact description of my problem. I could not have described it
    better. It is identical.

    Were you able to solve the problem? How?

    Jeff

    BillyBob wrote:
    > Dirge and Jeff,
    >
    > Your problems sound exactly like what I have been experiencing as
    > described a few posts back in "One computer out of four on network
    > VERY slow" on December 27. The connection will be OK for a few
    > minutes, but the ability to pull up web pages will be quickly lost ON
    > ONE LAPTOP COMPUTER ONLY. The other laptops and desktop work fine
    > with excellent Internet connectivity. The troublesome notebook will
    > connect to his own home network or to any unsecured networks and/ or
    > WiFi hotspots with no problems of all. But to my network, even with
    > the correct WPA encryption code, he can indeed connect, and can pull
    > up web pages, but only for a few minutes. Though the connection
    > signal strength and throughput remains strong (or at least the
    > on-screen indicators claim that it is strong), after just a few
    > minutes download speed will drop to lower than dial-up. Not
    > nonexistent, but just extremely slow. So far, it's a great mystery.
    > Occasionally, we get an on-screen message that there is little or no
    > connectivity and that Internet access might be poor. We get this
    > message despite an indicator of 54 Mbps with maximum signal strength.
    Jeff, Dec 29, 2005
    #6
  7. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Yes but going from 128 bit WEP key to a 64 bit one is really reducing the
    security and that is not good.

    I use WPA, not WEP, because it is more secure. But everything worked fine
    until a couple of weeks ago. Windows should be able to handle that. What you
    say makes me wonder if it is some other software update that is taking up
    more of the available ram and therefore messing things up. I do not
    remember adding new software into memory but will check for that. Maybe my
    virus checker database has gotten bigger or the new firefox 1.5 is taking up
    more ram than the earlier 1.0.x. Don't know.

    I wish one of the experts would help us poor newbies.

    Jeff

    Ding-a-lingman wrote:
    > I have had an almost identical problem with my wireless network since
    > installing a Westell 327W. The connection was constantly up and down
    > even though the Westell showed my connection to be good. With the
    > help of tech support from my BellSouth FastAccess ISP, I just got it
    > resolved today. They had me change my WEP key in the Westell from a
    > 128 bit to a 64 bit key (10 characters), and of course I had to
    > change the WEP keys in my laptops to match. They say they often find
    > Windows gets bogged down trying to encrypt at the 128 bit rate that
    > it just gives up and quits. The symptoms sound almost identical to
    > those you list in your postings, so if you have 128 bit WEP keys, you
    > might want to try it. My connection has not gone down even one time
    > since the change. And as a note, my old router only had lower bit
    > rate encryption, and I never had this problem with it.
    >
    > "Jeff" wrote:
    >
    >> I connect to the internet through a 3 PC home wireless Network which
    >> connects to a WPA protected router and then a cable modem. Recently
    >> I've had an annoying problem on this one PC:
    >>
    >> The network is always OK in that I can see and access the other
    >> computers with no problem or interruption. However, on this XP SP2
    >> laptop, I intermittently lose the ability to get to the internet.
    >> The wireless network has no problems from this laptop, but
    >> sometimes, after I have successfully connected to the internet (via
    >> the network), it no longer can find servers on the internet even
    >> though the "Wireless Network Connection" icon shows it to be
    >> connected. I can usually re-establish internet access by "viewing
    >> available wireless networks", disconnecting from the network (even
    >> though it shows it to be connected) and reconnecting again. This
    >> leaves me connected for a while and then I lose the internet again.
    >>
    >> Very annoying. What faulty setting should I be looking at?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >> Jeff
    Jeff, Dec 29, 2005
    #7
  8. I can't try reducing the encryption, because my son-in-law has gone back
    home with his laptop. But that is an interesting idea that coming down to 64
    bit will solve the problem. But I agree that is not acceptable, though I
    would try it if he was still here with his computer. Can you briefly try it
    Jeff, or Dirge? The strange thing about this cure to me is that it is
    referring to the Westell modem from BellSouth? That is the same one I have
    (Westell anyway, not sure about model number -- whichever one they are
    sending out now to customers), recently installed brand new. I did not even
    know that this device had any kind of encryption. If the computer was still
    here, I would also try BellSouth customer service, as I have had very
    excellent results in the past with them solving connection problems.

    But even if I was in a position to try this and it was a solution to the
    problem, it still remains a very strange problem. Because the connection
    worked fine with the old beat up laptop that our daughter brought with her,
    and works fine with my laptop that I am writing this response on now.
    Everything works fine with my desktop. It's only my son-in-law's newer IBM
    laptop that will briefly bring up a web page or two, and then start bogging
    down. But I would give it a try if he was still here. No need to call him
    and telling him to try it, because his laptop works just fine at his home and
    on everybody else's networks.

    Jeff, though we apparently have the same problem exactly, I have no
    solutions whatsoever. If you try something and it works, such as lowering
    the encryption values, please let me know. Though at the moment, it sounds
    like you and the rest of us are waiting for some very knowledgeable computer
    person to tell us what the trick is. To tell us what kind of setting or
    problem exists on the one computer that will connect strongly and load web
    pages for a minute or two and then become unusable. But only on one network,
    while continuing to work just fine on all the other networks. And while
    multiple other computers work just fine on the network that his won't bring
    up web pages on.


    "Jeff" wrote:

    > Yes but going from 128 bit WEP key to a 64 bit one is really reducing the
    > security and that is not good.
    >
    > I use WPA, not WEP, because it is more secure. But everything worked fine
    > until a couple of weeks ago. Windows should be able to handle that. What you
    > say makes me wonder if it is some other software update that is taking up
    > more of the available ram and therefore messing things up. I do not
    > remember adding new software into memory but will check for that. Maybe my
    > virus checker database has gotten bigger or the new firefox 1.5 is taking up
    > more ram than the earlier 1.0.x. Don't know.
    >
    > I wish one of the experts would help us poor newbies.
    >
    > Jeff
    =?Utf-8?B?QmlsbHlCb2I=?=, Dec 29, 2005
    #8
  9. Jeff

    DC Guest

    Y'all,
    I had similar problems. Repeated loss of access, even though the wireless
    NIC still had a valid IP, and everything else looked normal.
    The network would go away every 2-3 hours. Repeatedly.
    This morning I cranked down the WEP from 128 bit to 64 bit, and the network
    hasn't gone down all day. (10 hours so far).
    ??

    The PC in question has a AMD Sempron 3000, plenty of horsepower. Like
    BillyBob, my 7 year old desktop (300Mhz) with a different wireless NIC,
    never had a hiccup. This PC is the replacement, and I couldn't get it to
    stay on the network.

    Equipment:
    TRENDnet TEW-423PI wireless NIC 54gbps 802.11g PCI card
    Buffalo Airstation WLAR-L11-L (this is 802.11b only)
    WinXP SP2
    brand new install

    For now I am sticking with 64bit WEP. I will consider including MAC
    restrictions, though I know that isn't foolproof either.

    Thanks for the tip.

    -D


    "BillyBob" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > I can't try reducing the encryption, because my son-in-law has gone back
    > home with his laptop. But that is an interesting idea that coming down to
    > 64
    > bit will solve the problem. But I agree that is not acceptable, though I
    > would try it if he was still here with his computer. Can you briefly try
    > it
    > Jeff, or Dirge? The strange thing about this cure to me is that it is
    > referring to the Westell modem from BellSouth? That is the same one I
    > have
    > (Westell anyway, not sure about model number -- whichever one they are
    > sending out now to customers), recently installed brand new. I did not
    > even
    > know that this device had any kind of encryption. If the computer was
    > still
    > here, I would also try BellSouth customer service, as I have had very
    > excellent results in the past with them solving connection problems.
    >
    > But even if I was in a position to try this and it was a solution to the
    > problem, it still remains a very strange problem. Because the connection
    > worked fine with the old beat up laptop that our daughter brought with
    > her,
    > and works fine with my laptop that I am writing this response on now.
    > Everything works fine with my desktop. It's only my son-in-law's newer
    > IBM
    > laptop that will briefly bring up a web page or two, and then start
    > bogging
    > down. But I would give it a try if he was still here. No need to call
    > him
    > and telling him to try it, because his laptop works just fine at his home
    > and
    > on everybody else's networks.
    >
    > Jeff, though we apparently have the same problem exactly, I have no
    > solutions whatsoever. If you try something and it works, such as lowering
    > the encryption values, please let me know. Though at the moment, it
    > sounds
    > like you and the rest of us are waiting for some very knowledgeable
    > computer
    > person to tell us what the trick is. To tell us what kind of setting or
    > problem exists on the one computer that will connect strongly and load web
    > pages for a minute or two and then become unusable. But only on one
    > network,
    > while continuing to work just fine on all the other networks. And while
    > multiple other computers work just fine on the network that his won't
    > bring
    > up web pages on.
    >
    >
    > "Jeff" wrote:
    >
    >> Yes but going from 128 bit WEP key to a 64 bit one is really reducing the
    >> security and that is not good.
    >>
    >> I use WPA, not WEP, because it is more secure. But everything worked fine
    >> until a couple of weeks ago. Windows should be able to handle that. What
    >> you
    >> say makes me wonder if it is some other software update that is taking up
    >> more of the available ram and therefore messing things up. I do not
    >> remember adding new software into memory but will check for that. Maybe
    >> my
    >> virus checker database has gotten bigger or the new firefox 1.5 is taking
    >> up
    >> more ram than the earlier 1.0.x. Don't know.
    >>
    >> I wish one of the experts would help us poor newbies.
    >>
    >> Jeff

    >
    DC, Dec 29, 2005
    #9
  10. Jeff

    DC Guest

    this was a lie.

    The 64-bit WEP thing did not change the problem.
    I'm gonna try the other nic.


    "DC" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Y'all,
    > I had similar problems. Repeated loss of access, even though the wireless
    > NIC still had a valid IP, and everything else looked normal.
    > The network would go away every 2-3 hours. Repeatedly.
    > This morning I cranked down the WEP from 128 bit to 64 bit, and the
    > network hasn't gone down all day. (10 hours so far).
    > ??
    >
    > The PC in question has a AMD Sempron 3000, plenty of horsepower. Like
    > BillyBob, my 7 year old desktop (300Mhz) with a different wireless NIC,
    > never had a hiccup. This PC is the replacement, and I couldn't get it to
    > stay on the network.
    >
    > Equipment:
    > TRENDnet TEW-423PI wireless NIC 54gbps 802.11g PCI card
    > Buffalo Airstation WLAR-L11-L (this is 802.11b only)
    > WinXP SP2
    > brand new install
    >
    > For now I am sticking with 64bit WEP. I will consider including MAC
    > restrictions, though I know that isn't foolproof either.
    >
    > Thanks for the tip.
    >
    > -D
    >
    >
    > "BillyBob" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >> I can't try reducing the encryption, because my son-in-law has gone back
    >> home with his laptop. But that is an interesting idea that coming down
    >> to 64
    >> bit will solve the problem. But I agree that is not acceptable, though I
    >> would try it if he was still here with his computer. Can you briefly try
    >> it
    >> Jeff, or Dirge? The strange thing about this cure to me is that it is
    >> referring to the Westell modem from BellSouth? That is the same one I
    >> have
    >> (Westell anyway, not sure about model number -- whichever one they are
    >> sending out now to customers), recently installed brand new. I did not
    >> even
    >> know that this device had any kind of encryption. If the computer was
    >> still
    >> here, I would also try BellSouth customer service, as I have had very
    >> excellent results in the past with them solving connection problems.
    >>
    >> But even if I was in a position to try this and it was a solution to the
    >> problem, it still remains a very strange problem. Because the connection
    >> worked fine with the old beat up laptop that our daughter brought with
    >> her,
    >> and works fine with my laptop that I am writing this response on now.
    >> Everything works fine with my desktop. It's only my son-in-law's newer
    >> IBM
    >> laptop that will briefly bring up a web page or two, and then start
    >> bogging
    >> down. But I would give it a try if he was still here. No need to call
    >> him
    >> and telling him to try it, because his laptop works just fine at his home
    >> and
    >> on everybody else's networks.
    >>
    >> Jeff, though we apparently have the same problem exactly, I have no
    >> solutions whatsoever. If you try something and it works, such as
    >> lowering
    >> the encryption values, please let me know. Though at the moment, it
    >> sounds
    >> like you and the rest of us are waiting for some very knowledgeable
    >> computer
    >> person to tell us what the trick is. To tell us what kind of setting or
    >> problem exists on the one computer that will connect strongly and load
    >> web
    >> pages for a minute or two and then become unusable. But only on one
    >> network,
    >> while continuing to work just fine on all the other networks. And while
    >> multiple other computers work just fine on the network that his won't
    >> bring
    >> up web pages on.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Jeff" wrote:
    >>
    >>> Yes but going from 128 bit WEP key to a 64 bit one is really reducing
    >>> the
    >>> security and that is not good.
    >>>
    >>> I use WPA, not WEP, because it is more secure. But everything worked
    >>> fine
    >>> until a couple of weeks ago. Windows should be able to handle that. What
    >>> you
    >>> say makes me wonder if it is some other software update that is taking
    >>> up
    >>> more of the available ram and therefore messing things up. I do not
    >>> remember adding new software into memory but will check for that. Maybe
    >>> my
    >>> virus checker database has gotten bigger or the new firefox 1.5 is
    >>> taking up
    >>> more ram than the earlier 1.0.x. Don't know.
    >>>
    >>> I wish one of the experts would help us poor newbies.
    >>>
    >>> Jeff

    >>

    >
    >
    DC, Dec 29, 2005
    #10
  11. Here is something that might work. I can't try it out, since the non working
    computer is no longer at the house. Good luck, let mr know if this helps.

    http://www.dslreports.com/faq/12948

    Q: Why does my wireless connection repeatedly disconnect shortly after
    connecting? (#12948)
    A: You may be disconnected if either side of the connection is expecting an
    authentication exchange that fails to occur. This can occasionally happen
    even when the connection is not currently using any form of wireless security.

    Depending on your configuration, you may notice:
    the wireless client software indicates it is connected, but it repeatedly
    stops communicating within 5 minutes of the initial connection

    your client's DHCP request fails, either resulting in no IP address or an
    OS-assigned APIPA 169.254 address

    you can see the Access Point in a site survey or listing of available
    wireless networks, but your client cannot connect to it

    in the client's or AP's system log, DHCP, TCPIP, or WLAN Association entries
    repeatedly appear, and rebooting has not solved the problem


    The latest and most effective forms of wireless security expect
    authentication messages to be exchanged within a certain time and order. If
    this does not happen, the process ends by interrupting communications. Both
    the client and AP perform this checking on one another, so either one (or
    both) may be the side with the problem.

    These problems sometimes affect wireless products that currently are not
    configured to use wireless security. A connection may be configured under one
    security model, but then the AP is reconfigured and the client's
    configuration is not reset to match. Some wireless products may not tolerate
    unexpected issues like an AP changing security methods, frequently rebooting,
    or storing multiple configuration profiles for a single access point.
    Sometimes, the reason a configuration becomes corrupted remains unknown.

    Note: For specific instructions on how to complete any of the following
    steps using your particular hardware, software, or operating system, please
    consult your manuals or help files.

    STEPS TO TRY FIRST:
    Turn off any options to hide your SSID from beacon broadcasts.

    Turn off any proprietary speed-enhancing technologies.

    Remove all saved profiles for that AP from your wireless computers.

    Reboot your wireless computers and power-cycle your AP.

    Find your AP in a site survey and associate with it.


    Now test to see if the problem is resolved. If it is, no further action is
    necessary. However, if the problem persists, the below steps contain
    additional methods to overcome the problem:

    STEPS TO TRY NEXT:
    On your wireless AP, change your SSID to something that you have never used
    before.

    Unplug power to your AP, take note of the time.

    Remove all saved profiles for that AP from your wireless computers.

    Reboot your wireless computers.

    After 65+ minutes from step 2, plug in your router.

    Using your wireless computers, associate with the new SSID.

    Leave the client connected for 65+ minutes. There may or may not be
    indications of up to two brief reconnections during this time. Do not reboot
    the AP during this time.

    Shut down or reboot your wireless client computer normally (do not sleep,
    hibernate, or abruptly power-cycle).


    TIP: The 65+ minute wait before plugging in the router may not be necessary
    for your hardware or software. If you only have one or two clients, you may
    wish to first try these steps without that wait. If they are not successful,
    then try all of the steps again with the wait.

    EXPLANATION OF WHY THESE STEPS MIGHT HELP: Setting up a new SSID causes the
    clients to create a new, clean, and correct profile for the access point.
    Rebooting the hardware is one attempt at clearing authentication failure
    lockouts. Waiting 65 minutes with the router off is another (in case lockouts
    are remembered between reboots). Leaving the client online for 65 minutes is
    to ensure at least one successful key exchange after the initial successful
    authentication. Shutting down normally allows the software or OS to correctly
    save configuration information.
    by funchords edited by No_Strings
    (login to leave feedback on this)



    "DC" wrote:

    > this was a lie.
    >
    > The 64-bit WEP thing did not change the problem.
    > I'm gonna try the other nic.
    =?Utf-8?B?QmlsbHlCb2I=?=, Dec 30, 2005
    #11
  12. I hope you don't mind me tagging on the end of this thread. I have
    essentially the same problem and have been posting elswhere on the subject
    without much success.

    For the last two weeks I have had to listen to internet radio while using
    surfing, in order to maintain a data stream and avoid disconnection. This is
    evidently not a problem with signal strength nor bandwidth.

    I have tried some of the ideas in your post and did not realise that
    authentication could cause lockouts. I had Aegis and WLAN Transport protocols
    loaded from Skype or somewhere which I eliminated.

    Do I need any authentication enabled in the Network setup?

    In any case I can now stay connected without the radio, so thank you for that.

    Two other things seem possibly to make a difference.

    1. Reduce "roaming aggressiveness" to a minimum in the WiFi properties.
    2. In Wireless Zero Configuration, set the "recovery" options to "restart
    the service" in all three boxes. Also to set the delay time to zero.

    Perhaps I am beginning to hallucinate about improvements as I have tried
    about everything now:)

    Thanks again for the helpful thread.



    "BillyBob" wrote:

    > Here is something that might work. I can't try it out, since the non working
    > computer is no longer at the house. Good luck, let mr know if this helps.
    >
    > http://www.dslreports.com/faq/12948
    >
    > Q: Why does my wireless connection repeatedly disconnect shortly after
    > connecting? (#12948)
    > A: You may be disconnected if either side of the connection is expecting an
    > authentication exchange that fails to occur. This can occasionally happen
    > even when the connection is not currently using any form of wireless security.
    >
    > Depending on your configuration, you may notice:
    > the wireless client software indicates it is connected, but it repeatedly
    > stops communicating within 5 minutes of the initial connection
    >
    > your client's DHCP request fails, either resulting in no IP address or an
    > OS-assigned APIPA 169.254 address
    >
    > you can see the Access Point in a site survey or listing of available
    > wireless networks, but your client cannot connect to it
    >
    > in the client's or AP's system log, DHCP, TCPIP, or WLAN Association entries
    > repeatedly appear, and rebooting has not solved the problem
    >
    >
    > The latest and most effective forms of wireless security expect
    > authentication messages to be exchanged within a certain time and order. If
    > this does not happen, the process ends by interrupting communications. Both
    > the client and AP perform this checking on one another, so either one (or
    > both) may be the side with the problem.
    >
    > These problems sometimes affect wireless products that currently are not
    > configured to use wireless security. A connection may be configured under one
    > security model, but then the AP is reconfigured and the client's
    > configuration is not reset to match. Some wireless products may not tolerate
    > unexpected issues like an AP changing security methods, frequently rebooting,
    > or storing multiple configuration profiles for a single access point.
    > Sometimes, the reason a configuration becomes corrupted remains unknown.
    >
    > Note: For specific instructions on how to complete any of the following
    > steps using your particular hardware, software, or operating system, please
    > consult your manuals or help files.
    >
    > STEPS TO TRY FIRST:
    > Turn off any options to hide your SSID from beacon broadcasts.
    >
    > Turn off any proprietary speed-enhancing technologies.
    >
    > Remove all saved profiles for that AP from your wireless computers.
    >
    > Reboot your wireless computers and power-cycle your AP.
    >
    > Find your AP in a site survey and associate with it.
    >
    >
    > Now test to see if the problem is resolved. If it is, no further action is
    > necessary. However, if the problem persists, the below steps contain
    > additional methods to overcome the problem:
    >
    > STEPS TO TRY NEXT:
    > On your wireless AP, change your SSID to something that you have never used
    > before.
    >
    > Unplug power to your AP, take note of the time.
    >
    > Remove all saved profiles for that AP from your wireless computers.
    >
    > Reboot your wireless computers.
    >
    > After 65+ minutes from step 2, plug in your router.
    >
    > Using your wireless computers, associate with the new SSID.
    >
    > Leave the client connected for 65+ minutes. There may or may not be
    > indications of up to two brief reconnections during this time. Do not reboot
    > the AP during this time.
    >
    > Shut down or reboot your wireless client computer normally (do not sleep,
    > hibernate, or abruptly power-cycle).
    >
    >
    > TIP: The 65+ minute wait before plugging in the router may not be necessary
    > for your hardware or software. If you only have one or two clients, you may
    > wish to first try these steps without that wait. If they are not successful,
    > then try all of the steps again with the wait.
    >
    > EXPLANATION OF WHY THESE STEPS MIGHT HELP: Setting up a new SSID causes the
    > clients to create a new, clean, and correct profile for the access point.
    > Rebooting the hardware is one attempt at clearing authentication failure
    > lockouts. Waiting 65 minutes with the router off is another (in case lockouts
    > are remembered between reboots). Leaving the client online for 65 minutes is
    > to ensure at least one successful key exchange after the initial successful
    > authentication. Shutting down normally allows the software or OS to correctly
    > save configuration information.
    > by funchords edited by No_Strings
    > (login to leave feedback on this)
    >
    >
    >
    > "DC" wrote:
    >
    > > this was a lie.
    > >
    > > The 64-bit WEP thing did not change the problem.
    > > I'm gonna try the other nic.

    >
    =?Utf-8?B?cHV0bmlr?=, Mar 26, 2006
    #12
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