Renting via mail

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by andrew.upton4, Feb 6, 2005.

  1. Does anyone belong to one of those " Video clubs " where they send you a DVD
    by mail with unlimited rent time and free return postage ?
    If so, are they any good, and is it the RENTAL version ( the kind they have
    at Blockbusters with NO extras )
    or is it the RETAIL version of the DVD that they have ?
     
    andrew.upton4, Feb 6, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. andrew.upton4

    Joe S Guest

    andrew.upton4 wrote:
    > Does anyone belong to one of those " Video clubs " where they send you a DVD
    > by mail with unlimited rent time and free return postage ?
    > If so, are they any good,


    Yep. I find the Blockbuster deal very worthwhile. $15/mo. 3 out at a
    time plus 2 free in-store rentals (DVD or game) per month.


    > and is it the RENTAL version ( the kind they have at Blockbusters with NO extras )


    Huh??? Don't have an idea what you're referring to. They don't make
    special "skinny" versions for Blockbuster.


    > or is it the RETAIL version of the DVD that they have ?


    Yes.


    --
    Joe
     
    Joe S, Feb 6, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. andrew.upton4

    Mark B. Guest

    "andrew.upton4" <> wrote in message
    news:gLdNd.2176$...
    > Does anyone belong to one of those " Video clubs " where they send you a
    > DVD
    > by mail with unlimited rent time and free return postage ?
    > If so, are they any good, and is it the RENTAL version ( the kind they
    > have
    > at Blockbusters with NO extras )
    > or is it the RETAIL version of the DVD that they have ?
    >
    >


    What are you talking about? BB rents the same retail version sold
    everywhere else. Don't believe any of those urban legends that BB edits
    their movies or carries only stripped down versions.

    Mark
     
    Mark B., Feb 6, 2005
    #3
  4. In England, there are 2 versions of all DVD's
    1 - The RETAIL version. This consist of the movie, plus any amount of
    extras.
    2 - The RENTAL version. This consists of the movie and maybe a trailer and a
    commentary track ( if you are lucky )
    It is this rental version that Blockbuster ( In the United Kingdom ) has.
    "Mark B." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "andrew.upton4" <> wrote in message
    > news:gLdNd.2176$...
    > > Does anyone belong to one of those " Video clubs " where they send you a
    > > DVD
    > > by mail with unlimited rent time and free return postage ?
    > > If so, are they any good, and is it the RENTAL version ( the kind they
    > > have
    > > at Blockbusters with NO extras )
    > > or is it the RETAIL version of the DVD that they have ?
    > >
    > >

    >
    > What are you talking about? BB rents the same retail version sold
    > everywhere else. Don't believe any of those urban legends that BB edits
    > their movies or carries only stripped down versions.
    >
    > Mark
    >
    >
     
    andrew.upton4, Feb 6, 2005
    #4
  5. andrew.upton4

    Joe S Guest

    andrew.upton4 wrote:
    > In England, there are 2 versions of all DVD's
    > 1 - The RETAIL version. This consist of the movie, plus any amount of
    > extras.
    > 2 - The RENTAL version. This consists of the movie and maybe a trailer and a
    > commentary track ( if you are lucky )
    > It is this rental version that Blockbuster ( In the United Kingdom ) has.



    In that case, you maybe should have mentioned your location, especially
    in regards to a mail service which is VERY sensitive to locale.

    I've never heard about this RENTAL version in the UK, but there's
    probably no reason I should have.


    --
    Joe
     
    Joe S, Feb 6, 2005
    #5
  6. andrew.upton4

    Biz Guest

    There is no such thing as a rental version of a disk. BUt most rental
    places only rent the main movie disk of a two disk set.


    "andrew.upton4" <> wrote in message
    news:gLdNd.2176$...
    > Does anyone belong to one of those " Video clubs " where they send you a

    DVD
    > by mail with unlimited rent time and free return postage ?
    > If so, are they any good, and is it the RENTAL version ( the kind they

    have
    > at Blockbusters with NO extras )
    > or is it the RETAIL version of the DVD that they have ?
    >
    >
     
    Biz, Feb 6, 2005
    #6
  7. andrew.upton4

    Biz Guest

    I'm not in teh UK, but this is the 1st I've ever heard of that practice.
    Cna some other UK readers either confirm this or point out that he's a
    raving loon? ;)


    "andrew.upton4" <> wrote in message
    news:0fqNd.312$...
    > In England, there are 2 versions of all DVD's
    > 1 - The RETAIL version. This consist of the movie, plus any amount of
    > extras.
    > 2 - The RENTAL version. This consists of the movie and maybe a trailer and

    a
    > commentary track ( if you are lucky )
    > It is this rental version that Blockbuster ( In the United Kingdom ) has.
    > "Mark B." <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > "andrew.upton4" <> wrote in message
    > > news:gLdNd.2176$...
    > > > Does anyone belong to one of those " Video clubs " where they send you

    a
    > > > DVD
    > > > by mail with unlimited rent time and free return postage ?
    > > > If so, are they any good, and is it the RENTAL version ( the kind they
    > > > have
    > > > at Blockbusters with NO extras )
    > > > or is it the RETAIL version of the DVD that they have ?
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > What are you talking about? BB rents the same retail version sold
    > > everywhere else. Don't believe any of those urban legends that BB edits
    > > their movies or carries only stripped down versions.
    > >
    > > Mark
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Biz, Feb 6, 2005
    #7
  8. andrew.upton4

    Justin Guest

    Biz wrote on [Sun, 06 Feb 2005 18:25:12 GMT]:
    > I'm not in teh UK, but this is the 1st I've ever heard of that practice.
    > Cna some other UK readers either confirm this or point out that he's a
    > raving loon? ;)


    They do it to an extent in Australia as well

    >
    >
    > "andrew.upton4" <> wrote in message
    > news:0fqNd.312$...
    >> In England, there are 2 versions of all DVD's
    >> 1 - The RETAIL version. This consist of the movie, plus any amount of
    >> extras.
    >> 2 - The RENTAL version. This consists of the movie and maybe a trailer and

    > a
    >> commentary track ( if you are lucky )
    >> It is this rental version that Blockbuster ( In the United Kingdom ) has.
    >> "Mark B." <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > "andrew.upton4" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:gLdNd.2176$...
    >> > > Does anyone belong to one of those " Video clubs " where they send you

    > a
    >> > > DVD
    >> > > by mail with unlimited rent time and free return postage ?
    >> > > If so, are they any good, and is it the RENTAL version ( the kind they
    >> > > have
    >> > > at Blockbusters with NO extras )
    >> > > or is it the RETAIL version of the DVD that they have ?
    >> > >
    >> > >
    >> >
    >> > What are you talking about? BB rents the same retail version sold
    >> > everywhere else. Don't believe any of those urban legends that BB edits
    >> > their movies or carries only stripped down versions.
    >> >
    >> > Mark
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Justin, Feb 6, 2005
    #8
  9. andrew.upton4

    Bill Turner Guest

    On Sun, 06 Feb 2005 18:18:58 GMT, "Biz" <> wrote:

    >There is no such thing as a rental version of a disk.

    ___________________________________________________________

    Don't be so sure about that. Just a few days ago I had a disk from
    NetFlix which was clearly marked "Rental Version", and I don't mean a
    label of some kind. It was printed on the disk along with the title and
    all. I think it was Troy, but I could be mistaken.

    --
    BT
     
    Bill Turner, Feb 6, 2005
    #9
  10. andrew.upton4

    Stan Brown Guest

    "andrew.upton4" wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    >Does anyone belong to one of those " Video clubs " where they send you a DVD
    >by mail with unlimited rent time and free return postage ?


    <sarcasm>
    No, none of the thousands of people on this newsgroup have any
    experience with video rentals by mail. Sheesh!
    </sarcasm>

    htp://groups.google.com select "advanced search" and search for all
    the words "dvd rent mail" (no quotes).

    --

    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com/
     
    Stan Brown, Feb 6, 2005
    #10
  11. Bill Turner wrote:
    > On Sun, 06 Feb 2005 18:18:58 GMT, "Biz" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>There is no such thing as a rental version of a disk.

    >
    > ___________________________________________________________
    >
    > Don't be so sure about that. Just a few days ago I had a disk from
    > NetFlix which was clearly marked "Rental Version", and I don't mean a
    > label of some kind. It was printed on the disk along with the title and
    > all. I think it was Troy, but I could be mistaken.
    >

    I have Troy from Netflix sitting in front of me, and you are correct it
    says, "Rental Only - Not For Resale" clearly on the bottom. This is
    etched onto the disc label just like the disc's Title (if you put it
    real close to your eyes you can see through it -- the rest of the disc
    is grey). If I recall correctly, wasn't Netflix trying out some limited
    rental edition discs like a couple months back? On a side note, the
    disc is also labled Disc One, so it's interesting that it's rental only.
     
    Nicholas Andrade, Feb 6, 2005
    #11
  12. andrew.upton4

    Manda Guest

    I've seen "Rental Only" Netflix DVDs too, but they've always had the same
    special features as the retail version. Rental discs in the UK and
    Australia are often movie-only.

    Manda
     
    Manda, Feb 7, 2005
    #12
  13. On Sun, 06 Feb 2005 20:32:26 GMT, Justin <> wrote:

    >Biz wrote on [Sun, 06 Feb 2005 18:25:12 GMT]:
    >> I'm not in teh UK, but this is the 1st I've ever heard of that practice.
    >> Cna some other UK readers either confirm this or point out that he's a
    >> raving loon? ;)

    >
    >They do it to an extent in Australia as well



    I guess the first question is, Why?
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> "andrew.upton4" <> wrote in message
    >> news:0fqNd.312$...
    >>> In England, there are 2 versions of all DVD's
    >>> 1 - The RETAIL version. This consist of the movie, plus any amount of
    >>> extras.
    >>> 2 - The RENTAL version. This consists of the movie and maybe a trailer and

    >> a
    >>> commentary track ( if you are lucky )
    >>> It is this rental version that Blockbuster ( In the United Kingdom ) has.
    >>> "Mark B." <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>> > "andrew.upton4" <> wrote in message
    >>> > news:gLdNd.2176$...
    >>> > > Does anyone belong to one of those " Video clubs " where they send you

    >> a
    >>> > > DVD
    >>> > > by mail with unlimited rent time and free return postage ?
    >>> > > If so, are they any good, and is it the RENTAL version ( the kind they
    >>> > > have
    >>> > > at Blockbusters with NO extras )
    >>> > > or is it the RETAIL version of the DVD that they have ?
    >>> > >
    >>> > >
    >>> >
    >>> > What are you talking about? BB rents the same retail version sold
    >>> > everywhere else. Don't believe any of those urban legends that BB edits
    >>> > their movies or carries only stripped down versions.
    >>> >
    >>> > Mark
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>
     
    E. Barry Bruyea, Feb 7, 2005
    #13
  14. On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 06:02:02 -0600, Manda <> wrote:

    >I've seen "Rental Only" Netflix DVDs too, but they've always had the same
    >special features as the retail version. Rental discs in the UK and
    >Australia are often movie-only.
    >
    >Manda



    Maybe the "Rental Only" designation is for the protection of those who
    buy DVD's, and this way, they would know it was formerly a rental. I
    know of a small variety store that has a rack of DVD's for sale, but
    does not rent them; I've always assumed they buy them from rental
    outlets, although they don't advertise as such in the store.
     
    E. Barry Bruyea, Feb 7, 2005
    #14
  15. andrew.upton4

    Hagar Guest

    It's got to have something to do with copying the film,hasn't it?.A person
    has the chance to get a new released dvd copied for the price of the rental.
    Maybe the movie giants are thinking by leaving out all the extras off the
    rental version the would be copiers will go down to their local Woolies and
    get ripped off buying the full retail version instead.....If any of that
    makes sense............?
    "E. Barry Bruyea" <it'> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 06:02:02 -0600, Manda <> wrote:
    >
    >>I've seen "Rental Only" Netflix DVDs too, but they've always had the same
    >>special features as the retail version. Rental discs in the UK and
    >>Australia are often movie-only.
    >>
    >>Manda

    >
    >
    > Maybe the "Rental Only" designation is for the protection of those who
    > buy DVD's, and this way, they would know it was formerly a rental. I
    > know of a small variety store that has a rack of DVD's for sale, but
    > does not rent them; I've always assumed they buy them from rental
    > outlets, although they don't advertise as such in the store.
    >
     
    Hagar, Feb 7, 2005
    #15
  16. andrew.upton4

    Justin Guest

    E Barry Bruyea wrote on [Mon, 07 Feb 2005 07:56:25 -0500]:
    > On Sun, 06 Feb 2005 20:32:26 GMT, Justin <> wrote:
    >
    >>Biz wrote on [Sun, 06 Feb 2005 18:25:12 GMT]:
    >>> I'm not in teh UK, but this is the 1st I've ever heard of that practice.
    >>> Cna some other UK readers either confirm this or point out that he's a
    >>> raving loon? ;)

    >>
    >>They do it to an extent in Australia as well

    >
    >
    > I guess the first question is, Why?


    to force the people who want the extras to buy the disc.
     
    Justin, Feb 7, 2005
    #16
  17. andrew.upton4

    Bill Turner Guest

    On Mon, 7 Feb 2005 14:04:46 +0000 (UTC), "Hagar" <sammyhagar@NO
    SPAM!btinternet.com> wrote:

    >It's got to have something to do with copying the film,hasn't it?.A person
    >has the chance to get a new released dvd copied for the price of the rental.
    >Maybe the movie giants are thinking by leaving out all the extras off the
    >rental version the would be copiers will go down to their local Woolies and
    >get ripped off buying the full retail version instead.....If any of that
    >makes sense............?

    ___________________________________________________________

    I think it's simpler than that, at least in California. It has to do
    with sales tax. Ordinarily a company that buys an item in large
    quantities for resale does not pay sales tax, but does collect tax from
    the end purchaser. In this case, NetFlix is the end purchaser, so
    NetFlix pays the sales tax. You will often see the same thing at
    restaurants where the bottle of ketchup is marked "not for resale",
    meaning the restaurant has paid the sales tax.

    --
    BT
     
    Bill Turner, Feb 7, 2005
    #17
  18. andrew.upton4

    FAQmeister Guest

    "Bill Turner" <> wrote in message
    news:
    > On Mon, 7 Feb 2005 14:04:46 +0000 (UTC), "Hagar" <sammyhagar@NO
    > SPAM!btinternet.com> wrote:
    >
    >> It's got to have something to do with copying the film,hasn't it?.A
    >> person has the chance to get a new released dvd copied for the price
    >> of the rental. Maybe the movie giants are thinking by leaving out
    >> all the extras off the rental version the would be copiers will go
    >> down to their local Woolies and get ripped off buying the full
    >> retail version instead.....If any of that makes sense............?

    > ___________________________________________________________
    >
    > I think it's simpler than that, at least in California. It has to do
    > with sales tax. Ordinarily a company that buys an item in large
    > quantities for resale does not pay sales tax, but does collect tax
    > from the end purchaser. In this case, NetFlix is the end purchaser, so
    > NetFlix pays the sales tax. You will often see the same thing at
    > restaurants where the bottle of ketchup is marked "not for resale",
    > meaning the restaurant has paid the sales tax.


    But why would the manufacturer, or the state for that matter, care if
    the sales tax was paid twice?

    I think these items are marked "not for resale" because they are
    purchased at a sizable discount and the manufacturer doesn't want people
    doing that and then reselling the stuff at a profit.
    --
    Buford T. Justice
    The alt.video.dvd faq is located at:
    http://aww-faq.org/dvdfaq.html
     
    FAQmeister, Feb 7, 2005
    #18
  19. andrew.upton4

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    Bill Turner wrote:
    > On Mon, 7 Feb 2005 14:04:46 +0000 (UTC), "Hagar" <sammyhagar@NO
    > SPAM!btinternet.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>It's got to have something to do with copying the film,hasn't it?.A person
    >>has the chance to get a new released dvd copied for the price of the rental.
    >>Maybe the movie giants are thinking by leaving out all the extras off the
    >>rental version the would be copiers will go down to their local Woolies and
    >>get ripped off buying the full retail version instead.....If any of that
    >>makes sense............?

    >
    > ___________________________________________________________
    >
    > I think it's simpler than that, at least in California. It has to do
    > with sales tax. Ordinarily a company that buys an item in large
    > quantities for resale does not pay sales tax, but does collect tax from
    > the end purchaser. In this case, NetFlix is the end purchaser, so
    > NetFlix pays the sales tax. You will often see the same thing at
    > restaurants where the bottle of ketchup is marked "not for resale",
    > meaning the restaurant has paid the sales tax.
    >


    I suspect it is even simpler. Originally both VHS and DVD were
    released first to rental outlets at higher prices. After the "Rental
    Window", which varied from 30 or 45 days to 6 months, the VHS/DVD was
    released for normal retail.

    Most distributors have abandoned the system, but I would presume the
    ones still doing so mark the versions distributed during the rental window.

    --
    Cheers
    Oldus Fartus
     
    Oldus Fartus, Feb 7, 2005
    #19
  20. andrew.upton4

    Bill Turner Guest

    On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 07:10:57 +0800, Oldus Fartus
    <> wrote:

    >I suspect it is even simpler. Originally both VHS and DVD were
    >released first to rental outlets at higher prices. After the "Rental
    >Window", which varied from 30 or 45 days to 6 months, the VHS/DVD was
    >released for normal retail.
    >
    >Most distributors have abandoned the system, but I would presume the
    >ones still doing so mark the versions distributed during the rental window.

    ___________________________________________________________

    Why would anyone care that the 'rental window' DVD's were marked in the
    first place? Other things are sold at different prices all the time
    without having to be marked.

    --
    BT
     
    Bill Turner, Feb 8, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Brian

    How does renting an apt. work?

    Brian, Apr 4, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    601
    Cynthia A Felver
    Apr 11, 2005
  2. Paul Sergievski
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    480
    Paul Sergievski
    Apr 21, 2005
  3. Nick Ivanov

    Powerful Billing For Renting Online

    Nick Ivanov, May 18, 2005, in forum: VOIP
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    421
    Nick Ivanov
    May 18, 2005
  4. Pete Boyd

    Renting lenses in London, UK?

    Pete Boyd, Aug 7, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    646
  5. squelch41

    Renting a film scanner in the UK

    squelch41, Feb 26, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    626
    Richard McBride
    Feb 28, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page