Removing dust from color slides?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Guest, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I have a lots of color slides to scan. Although my scanner does remove some
    of the dust it does not, at times, remove all of it.
    I wonder what would be the best way to remove dust from the slides before
    scanning.
     
    Guest, Jan 4, 2007
    #1
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  2. Guest

    tomm42 Guest

    On Jan 4, 2:09 pm, <> wrote:
    > I have a lots of color slides to scan. Although my scanner does remove some
    > of the dust it does not, at times, remove all of it.
    > I wonder what would be the best way to remove dust from the slides before
    > scanning.


    I start with a brush, I have one called "Static Wisk", have a 3 inch
    one at home and a 1.5 inch one at work, prefer the 3", there is also
    one called a"Static Master". If that is not working I use canned air
    (at home, forbidden at work). Old slides are a real hassle, they had
    softer emulsions, a couple of humid days and the dust embeds in the
    emulsion, this is where Digital Ice is worth it. There are all sorts of
    ways to edit out dust in Photoshop (more area than clone or healing
    brush), but it is a real pain. Get as much dust off as you can before
    you scan.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, Jan 4, 2007
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Neil Ellwood Guest

    On Thu, 04 Jan 2007 19:09:28 +0000, marierdj wrote:

    > I have a lots of color slides to scan. Although my scanner does remove some
    > of the dust it does not, at times, remove all of it.
    > I wonder what would be the best way to remove dust from the slides before
    > scanning.


    If the slides are in glassless mounts the film cleaner used carefully. If
    in glass mounts use either lens cleaner or a cleaner made for spectacle
    lenses again very carefully.

    --
    Neil
    Reverse 'ra' and delete 'l'.
     
    Neil Ellwood, Jan 4, 2007
    #3
  4. Guest

    Bob Salomon Guest

    In article <>,
    "tomm42" <> wrote:

    > On Jan 4, 2:09 pm, <> wrote:
    > > I have a lots of color slides to scan. Although my scanner does remove some
    > > of the dust it does not, at times, remove all of it.
    > > I wonder what would be the best way to remove dust from the slides before
    > > scanning.

    >
    > I start with a brush, I have one called "Static Wisk", have a 3 inch
    > one at home and a 1.5 inch one at work, prefer the 3", there is also
    > one called a"Static Master". If that is not working I use canned air
    > (at home, forbidden at work). Old slides are a real hassle, they had
    > softer emulsions, a couple of humid days and the dust embeds in the
    > emulsion, this is where Digital Ice is worth it. There are all sorts of
    > ways to edit out dust in Photoshop (more area than clone or healing
    > brush), but it is a real pain. Get as much dust off as you can before
    > you scan.
    >
    > Tom


    Never, ever, use canned air on film, lenses, screens or anything else
    that is valuable. Not only can it spit out propellent if held at the
    wrong angle but it can also spit out freezing gas.

    Use a safe method like a Rocket blower.

    It contains no propellent, is not flammable, not explosive, contains no
    dangerous fumes, etc. Nothing but air comes out the nozzle.

    Why do you think that you can't use canned air at work?

    BTW, that Staticmaster brush used a strip of radioactive polynimum (or
    how ever it is spelled). First problem is that it had a very short half
    life and would loose its static repelling charge. Second problem -
    remember that KGB agent that died in London recently?

    --
    To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
     
    Bob Salomon, Jan 4, 2007
    #4
  5. Guest

    Mike Russell Guest

    "Bob Salomon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > "tomm42" <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Jan 4, 2:09 pm, <> wrote:
    >> > I have a lots of color slides to scan. Although my scanner does remove
    >> > some
    >> > of the dust it does not, at times, remove all of it.
    >> > I wonder what would be the best way to remove dust from the slides
    >> > before
    >> > scanning.

    >>
    >> I start with a brush, I have one called "Static Wisk", have a 3 inch
    >> one at home and a 1.5 inch one at work, prefer the 3", there is also
    >> one called a"Static Master". If that is not working I use canned air
    >> (at home, forbidden at work). Old slides are a real hassle, they had
    >> softer emulsions, a couple of humid days and the dust embeds in the
    >> emulsion, this is where Digital Ice is worth it. There are all sorts of
    >> ways to edit out dust in Photoshop (more area than clone or healing
    >> brush), but it is a real pain. Get as much dust off as you can before
    >> you scan.
    >>
    >> Tom

    >
    > Never, ever, use canned air on film, lenses, screens or anything else
    > that is valuable. Not only can it spit out propellent if held at the
    > wrong angle but it can also spit out freezing gas.


    Your response is so riddled with inaccuracies that I'm compelled to respond.
    Canned air can also be very effective, and will not spit out propellant, or
    freezng gas, or a stream of tiny monkeys, if you hold the can upright.

    > Use a safe method like a Rocket blower.


    Nothing against Rocket blowers.

    > It contains no propellent, is not flammable, not explosive, contains no
    > dangerous fumes, etc. Nothing but air comes out the nozzle.


    Canned air contains propellant, and some care must be taken to keep the can
    upright, however it is not flammable, explosive, nor does it have dangerous
    fumes. There is nothing like canned air for blowing dust out of complex
    components and equipment. It does a great job at cleaning a keyboard, for
    example, and I used it to good effect cleaning dust out of a microscope
    lighting system.

    > Why do you think that you can't use canned air at work?


    Your guess is as good as mine. Possibly it's too expensive.

    > BTW, that Staticmaster brush used a strip of radioactive polynimum (or
    > how ever it is spelled). First problem is that it had a very short half
    > life and would loose its static repelling charge.


    The half life is very short, about four months, so do not purchase one that
    has been on the shelf for a significant length of time.

    > Second problem -
    > remember that KGB agent that died in London recently?


    The polonium used in anti static products is encapsulated as tiny plastic
    beads and will not be absorbed even if ingested, it is not a strip. While I
    respect the decision of those who choose not to have radioactive materials
    in their proximity, it is not considered a significant health risk.
    --
    Mike Russell
    www.curvemeister.com/forum/
     
    Mike Russell, Jan 5, 2007
    #5
  6. Guest

    Paul Bartram Guest

    "Bob Salomon" <> wrote

    > BTW, that Staticmaster brush used a strip of radioactive polynimum (or
    > how ever it is spelled). First problem is that it had a very short half
    > life and would loose its static repelling charge. Second problem -
    > remember that KGB agent that died in London recently?


    Yes, he was 'blown away'...

    First a poison-tipped umbrella, now a can of compressed air - these SMERSH
    agents are tricky, huh?

    Paul
     
    Paul Bartram, Jan 5, 2007
    #6
  7. In article <Ihcnh.40542$>,
    <> wrote:

    > I have a lots of color slides to scan. Although my scanner does remove some
    > of the dust it does not, at times, remove all of it.
    > I wonder what would be the best way to remove dust from the slides before
    > scanning.


    I flick them hard with a finger a couple of times and then blow using
    one of those rubber bulb syringes that come with ear wax removal kits.
    The if there is still visible dust, scan with ICE active. If there is
    still some defects on the finished scan, Use Polaroid Dust and Scratches
    filter (either free standing or as a PS plugin). there are also other
    dust "removal" software.

    Don't use your mouth to blow them as this contains moisture and the
    canned air sprays are relatively expensive and may shoot propellant.

    --
    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and
    carrying a cross."
    Sinclair Lewis
     
    Ockham's Razor, Jan 5, 2007
    #7
  8. Mike Russell wrote:
    > "Bob Salomon" <> wrote in message
    > news:...


    >> Second problem -
    >> remember that KGB agent that died in London recently?

    >
    > The polonium used in anti static products is encapsulated as tiny plastic
    > beads and will not be absorbed even if ingested, it is not a strip. While I
    > respect the decision of those who choose not to have radioactive materials
    > in their proximity, it is not considered a significant health risk.


    Well, it *is* a strip, in some sense; those beads are in turn bonded or
    embedded in a small strip that you can see.

    Clever designers, using the half-life of the source of ionizing
    radiation to make *sure* people bought a new brush frequently :).
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Jan 5, 2007
    #8
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