Removing 64-bit IE

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Rob, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. Rob

    Rob Guest

    I have a 64-bit 2003 Server that is also a Citrix server. It has both
    the 64-bit and 32-bit versions of IE installed. For some reason, I
    cannot get one version or the other to be the default. I'm guessing
    it is because one user in a terminal session will open the 64-bit
    version of IE and will set it to default while a user in a different
    terminal session will use the 32-bit version. So, my proposal is to
    eliminate one of the versions. Since we rely on Flash in some web
    sites, I'm guessing we need to get rid of the 64-bit version. My
    question is, can I safely get uninstall it leaving only the 32-bit
    version to be the default web browser?
     
    Rob, Jun 4, 2008
    #1
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  2. Rob

    Dave English Guest

    In message <>, Stefan Pendl
    <> writes
    >On Wed, 4 Jun 2008 10:08:33 -0700 (PDT), Rob
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>I have a 64-bit 2003 Server that is also a Citrix server. It has both
    >>the 64-bit and 32-bit versions of IE installed. For some reason, I
    >>cannot get one version or the other to be the default. I'm guessing
    >>it is because one user in a terminal session will open the 64-bit
    >>version of IE and will set it to default while a user in a different
    >>terminal session will use the 32-bit version. So, my proposal is to
    >>eliminate one of the versions.


    >As far as I know, you can not uninstall the 64-bit version only.
    >
    >The 64-bit version is located in %ProgramFiles%, where the 32-bit
    >version is located in %ProgramFiles(x86)%.
    >You may succeed by creating a hard link from one folder to the other,
    >after renaming the folder of the 64-bit version.
    >
    >You will need to rename the hard link and original folder before every
    >update or the 32-bit version will be updated with the 64-bit version.


    Yes, that could easily lead to trouble

    I would suggest instead using permissions in the registry to prevent
    changes to the registry entries in HKLM/Software/Classes. Protecting
    http & https protocol entries should be enough for many purposes

    That would avoid upsetting software updates etc..

    Regards
    --
    Dave English Senior Software & Systems Engineer
    Internet Platform Development, Thus plc
     
    Dave English, Jun 5, 2008
    #2
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