"Remove the battery when not using the camera."

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by thanatoid, Sep 14, 2010.

  1. thanatoid

    thanatoid Guest

    I recently stepped /even deeper/ into this century, by buying a
    digital camera. It is pretty amazing. Of course, it is also
    fodder for my carping, since NO ONE needs more than 6 MPs, and
    these days, all the cameras costing more than $50 offer 12 or 14
    MPs, not to mention the 50 or 60 MP Hasselblad.

    Anyway, the instructions say "remove the battery when not in
    use".

    (Yes, I read instructions, even when they are NOT included with
    the camera except on the CD - along with the most absurdly
    bloated 80MB [IIRC] and totally unnecessary "software" - and
    have to be printed out, all 100+ pages.)

    It is also suggested you place the battery in a nice $0.03 piece
    of clear plastic thoughtfully provided and proudly bearing the
    moniker of "battery case".

    I am not aware of any factual reason for removing the battery.
    The instruction do not even say "when not using the camera for a
    long time". They just say "remove it".

    IS there ANY advantage to removing the Li-Ion battery and
    placing in the nifty plastic mini-case other than the fact you
    are /very/ likely to lose it, thereby being forced to buy a new
    one, presumably at ¼ the price of the camera itself?


    --
    "Anytime I hear the word "culture", I get on the Internet."
    - a 21st Century Moron
     
    thanatoid, Sep 14, 2010
    #1
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  2. thanatoid

    Buffalo Guest

    thanatoid wrote:
    [snip]
    > I am not aware of any factual reason for removing the battery.
    > The instruction do not even say "when not using the camera for a
    > long time". They just say "remove it".


    Well, I sure wouldn't remove it while I WAS using the camera. Ha Ha


    > IS there ANY advantage to removing the Li-Ion battery and
    > placing in the nifty plastic mini-case other than the fact you
    > are /very/ likely to lose it, thereby being forced to buy a new
    > one, presumably at ¼ the price of the camera itself?


    What better reason is there and it will help the economy. :)

    I hope you enjoy it!
    Buffalo
     
    Buffalo, Sep 14, 2010
    #2
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  3. thanatoid

    thanatoid Guest

    "Buffalo" <> wrote in
    news:i6mkfo$bsr$-september.org:

    <snip>

    >> IS there ANY advantage to removing the Li-Ion battery and
    >> placing in the nifty plastic mini-case other than the fact
    >> you are /very/ likely to lose it, thereby being forced to
    >> buy a new one, presumably at ¼ the price of the camera
    >> itself?

    >
    > What better reason is there and it will help the economy.
    > :)
    >
    > I hope you enjoy it!
    > Buffalo


    Thanks for the laugh. I /am/ still getting used to the quantum
    leap it represents Vs. the 35mm SLR's I have used in the past...
    Amazing...

    Did I mention how great the new USB flash drives are? They store
    more than HDs used to! And you can carry them...

    /sound of loud vinyl scratching/

    :)


    --
    "Anytime I hear the word "culture", I get on the Internet."
    - a 21st Century Moron
     
    thanatoid, Sep 14, 2010
    #3
  4. thanatoid

    philo Guest

    On 09/13/2010 08:59 PM, thanatoid wrote:
    > "Buffalo"<> wrote in
    > news:i6mkfo$bsr$-september.org:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>> IS there ANY advantage to removing the Li-Ion battery and
    >>> placing in the nifty plastic mini-case other than the fact
    >>> you are /very/ likely to lose it, thereby being forced to
    >>> buy a new one, presumably at ¼ the price of the camera
    >>> itself?

    >>
    >> What better reason is there and it will help the economy.
    >> :)
    >>
    >> I hope you enjoy it!
    >> Buffalo

    >
    > Thanks for the laugh. I /am/ still getting used to the quantum
    > leap it represents Vs. the 35mm SLR's I have used in the past...
    > Amazing...
    >
    > Did I mention how great the new USB flash drives are? They store
    > more than HDs used to! And you can carry them...
    >
    > /sound of loud vinyl scratching/
    >
    > :)
    >
    >




    It should not hurt anything to leave the battery in the camera.

    I'd only take it out if the camera was going to be out of use for more
    than a few months. There is a small possibility it could leak.
     
    philo, Sep 14, 2010
    #4
  5. thanatoid

    thanatoid Guest

    philo <> wrote in
    news:i6mnm3$kpc$-september.org:

    <snip>

    > It should not hurt anything to leave the battery in the
    > camera.
    >
    > I'd only take it out if the camera was going to be out of
    > use for more than a few months. There is a small
    > possibility it could leak.


    Thanks, philo. That makes some sense.



    --
    "Anytime I hear the word "culture", I get on the Internet."
    - a 21st Century Moron
     
    thanatoid, Sep 14, 2010
    #5
  6. thanatoid

    thanatoid Guest

    "tom" <8@~.com> wrote in
    news:i6mqt1$1c0$-september.org:


    > Can't reply to specifics about dig cameras but personally
    > I've lost 2 remotes in the last 10 years to brand name
    > batteries leaking.


    We all have, although a good cleaning will fix the problem.

    Remotes use AA or (the stupid) AAA batteries, and if you use
    anything but alkalines, preferably Costco (better than Duracell
    at ½ price), *all* regular/cheap batts will leak eventually. I
    /have/ seen a few alkalines leak, but it is very rare.


    --
    "Anytime I hear the word "culture", I get on the Internet."
    - a 21st Century Moron
     
    thanatoid, Sep 14, 2010
    #6
  7. thanatoid

    tom Guest

    "thanatoid" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9DF2E98439149thanexit@188.40.43.230...
    > "tom" <8@~.com> wrote in
    > news:i6mqt1$1c0$-september.org:
    >
    >
    >> Can't reply to specifics about dig cameras but personally
    >> I've lost 2 remotes in the last 10 years to brand name
    >> batteries leaking.

    >
    > We all have, although a good cleaning will fix the problem.


    I use nothing but alkaline batteries. No amount of "cleaning" was able to
    salvage either remote. I sent the leaking batteries and damaged remotes to
    bat manufacturer and was issued a partial (about 75%) refund to replace
    remotes. Would hate to have to eat 25% of the cost of a new camera.
     
    tom, Sep 14, 2010
    #7
  8. thanatoid

    VanguardLH Guest

    thanatoid wrote:

    > I recently stepped /even deeper/ into this century, by buying a
    > digital camera. It is pretty amazing. Of course, it is also
    > fodder for my carping, since NO ONE needs more than 6 MPs, and
    > these days, all the cameras costing more than $50 offer 12 or 14
    > MPs, not to mention the 50 or 60 MP Hasselblad.
    >
    > Anyway, the instructions say "remove the battery when not in
    > use".
    >
    > (Yes, I read instructions, even when they are NOT included with
    > the camera except on the CD - along with the most absurdly
    > bloated 80MB [IIRC] and totally unnecessary "software" - and
    > have to be printed out, all 100+ pages.)
    >
    > It is also suggested you place the battery in a nice $0.03 piece
    > of clear plastic thoughtfully provided and proudly bearing the
    > moniker of "battery case".
    >
    > I am not aware of any factual reason for removing the battery.
    > The instruction do not even say "when not using the camera for a
    > long time". They just say "remove it".
    >
    > IS there ANY advantage to removing the Li-Ion battery and
    > placing in the nifty plastic mini-case other than the fact you
    > are /very/ likely to lose it, thereby being forced to buy a new
    > one, presumably at ¼ the price of the camera itself?


    You've never had batteries leak?

    Your suggestion (in your other post) of just cleaning up after the mess
    doesn't work. First, you won't be catching the batteries when they
    first start leaking. They will have been there for months corroding
    away the metals. You cleaning the contacts wears them down even further
    and you cannot remove all the corrosion, plus you'll probably end up
    removing the protective plating (if the corrosion didn't already do so).

    So you think you can clean the contacts. Are you also going to fully
    dismantle the case to make sure you remove any electrolyte that has
    oozed inside the case? After all, just go take a look at the recess in
    which the batteries reside in the camera case. Are your fingers really
    that skinny or your control over picking tools so great that you truly
    believe you can clean the contacts at the deep end of the recess?

    They probably didn't give a reason because they figured anyone old
    enough to use a digital camera already knows about what happens when
    batteries leak and the damage caused therefrom that cleaning will not
    fix.

    Lithium battery leakage occurs less often due to their longer shelf life
    than for alkaline batteries. However, the manufacturer has no control
    over what type of batteries you put inside their product. Just because
    you happen to use lithium batteries doesn't mean other consumers don't
    use alkaline batteries. All batteries go dead. Dead batteries leak.
    Li-ion batteries will leak, too.

    http://knol.google.com/k/everything-you-need-to-know-about-primary-battery-leakage#
     
    VanguardLH, Sep 14, 2010
    #8
  9. thanatoid

    thanatoid Guest

    VanguardLH <> wrote in
    news:i6n3lj$pfk$:

    <snip>

    > You've never had batteries leak?


    Of course, but I have never owned a Li-Ion battery and I have
    not heard of them leaking, or even having anything that COULD
    leak inside them.

    > Your suggestion (in your other post) of just cleaning up
    > after the mess doesn't work.


    It works for me, YMobviouslyV.

    > First, you won't be catching
    > the batteries when they first start leaking. They will
    > have been there for months corroding away the metals. You
    > cleaning the contacts wears them down even further


    Which contacts? The "heavy duty" or alkaline battery is history,
    and the metal contacts in the unit can handle both corrosion AND
    cleaning, and if not, they can be replaced for about 50 cents.

    > and you
    > cannot remove all the corrosion, plus you'll probably end
    > up removing the protective plating (if the corrosion didn't
    > already do so).


    I have yet to see any protective plating on battery contacts in
    most equipment using AA batteries. I have never owned a digital
    camera before, let alone an AA-powered one, and the button
    batteries in my SLRs never leaked. Even my alkalines only leaked
    /maybe/ 10 times in my 50+ years of using batteries.

    > So you think you can clean the contacts.


    I know I can, I have done it about half a dozen times.

    > Are you also
    > going to fully dismantle the case to make sure you remove
    > any electrolyte that has oozed inside the case?


    Of course, I have done it about half a dozen times.

    > After all,
    > just go take a look at the recess in which the batteries
    > reside in the camera case. Are your fingers really that
    > skinny or your control over picking tools so great that you
    > truly believe you can clean the contacts at the deep end of
    > the recess?


    At this point, there is nothing *to* clean in the tiny Li-Ion
    battery compartment in the month-old camera, nor do I think
    there ever will be.

    Why not stick to the thread title? I was asking about the
    curious phrasing of the warning.

    > They probably didn't give a reason because they figured
    > anyone old enough to use a digital camera already knows
    > about what happens when batteries leak and the damage
    > caused therefrom that cleaning will not fix.


    You greatly overestimate the experience and knowledge of digital
    camera users. Many owners over 50 take a few pictures and then
    abandon the camera because they either forget they have it or
    they never looked at the box contents (never mind read the
    manual, printed or otherwise) and therefore do not know how to
    connect the camera to their computer.

    The person I am speaking of, who has done BOTH, has had the
    camera with two AA alkalines in it sitting on his shelf for 3
    years, with 4 pix in it. The cable is still in the sealed
    plastic bag. There is no leakage from the batteries.

    Most young people use digital cameras for Faceshit, etc.

    > Lithium battery leakage occurs less often due to their
    > longer shelf life than for alkaline batteries. However,
    > the manufacturer has no control over what type of batteries
    > you put inside their product. Just because you happen to
    > use lithium batteries doesn't mean other consumers don't
    > use alkaline batteries.


    I have yet to see a 5.1V alkaline battery which is a 1 x 1.2"
    rectangle 1/8" inch thick.

    > All batteries go dead. Dead
    > batteries leak. Li-ion batteries will leak, too.


    Maybe. Will removing them from the camera make a differnce?
    Ahhh. That would require addressing the thread subject...

    > http://knol.google.com/k/everything-you-need-to-know-about-p
    > rimary-battery-leakage#


    Thank you.



    --
    "Anytime I hear the word "culture", I get on the Internet."
    - a 21st Century Moron
     
    thanatoid, Sep 14, 2010
    #9
  10. thanatoid

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    On 14/09/2010 02:43, thanatoid wrote:
    > I recently stepped /even deeper/ into this century, by buying a
    > digital camera. It is pretty amazing. Of course, it is also
    > fodder for my carping, since NO ONE needs more than 6 MPs, and

    Except those taking pictures that are likely to be blown up to billboard
    size when 6MP will probably look a bit rough ;-)
     
    Desk Rabbit, Sep 14, 2010
    #10
  11. thanatoid

    Jenna Tills Guest

    On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 01:43:46 +0000, thanatoid wrote:

    > I recently stepped /even deeper/ into this century, by buying a digital
    > camera. It is pretty amazing. Of course, it is also fodder for my
    > carping, since NO ONE needs more than 6 MPs, and these days, all the
    > cameras costing more than $50 offer 12 or 14 MPs, not to mention the 50
    > or 60 MP Hasselblad.
    >
    > Anyway, the instructions say "remove the battery when not in use".
    >
    > (Yes, I read instructions, even when they are NOT included with the
    > camera except on the CD - along with the most absurdly bloated 80MB
    > [IIRC] and totally unnecessary "software" - and have to be printed out,
    > all 100+ pages.)
    >
    > It is also suggested you place the battery in a nice $0.03 piece of
    > clear plastic thoughtfully provided and proudly bearing the moniker of
    > "battery case".
    >
    > I am not aware of any factual reason for removing the battery. The
    > instruction do not even say "when not using the camera for a long time".
    > They just say "remove it".
    >
    > IS there ANY advantage to removing the Li-Ion battery and placing in the
    > nifty plastic mini-case other than the fact you are /very/ likely to
    > lose it, thereby being forced to buy a new one, presumably at Å’ the
    > price of the camera itself?



    Obviously the battery discharges while in the camera. The camera must
    have a separate CMOS clock and power source to retain settings and date/
    time. Do as the owners manual says.
     
    Jenna Tills, Sep 14, 2010
    #11
  12. thanatoid

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    On 14/09/2010 02:43, thanatoid wrote:
    > I recently stepped /even deeper/ into this century, by buying a
    > digital camera. It is pretty amazing. Of course, it is also
    > fodder for my carping, since NO ONE needs more than 6 MPs, and
    > these days, all the cameras costing more than $50 offer 12 or 14
    > MPs, not to mention the 50 or 60 MP Hasselblad.
    >
    > Anyway, the instructions say "remove the battery when not in
    > use".


    One Google example here
    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1031&message=9366754

    >
    > (Yes, I read instructions, even when they are NOT included with
    > the camera except on the CD - along with the most absurdly
    > bloated 80MB [IIRC] and totally unnecessary "software" - and

    They are on CD for the simple reason that it saves cutting down tress to
    print 100 of pages that most people probably don't read.

    > have to be printed out, all 100+ pages.)

    Oh dear! PDF readers not your thing?

    >
    > It is also suggested you place the battery in a nice $0.03 piece
    > of clear plastic thoughtfully provided and proudly bearing the
    > moniker of "battery case".
    >
    > I am not aware of any factual reason for removing the battery.
    > The instruction do not even say "when not using the camera for a
    > long time". They just say "remove it".
    >
    > IS there ANY advantage to removing the Li-Ion battery and
    > placing in the nifty plastic mini-case other than the fact you
    > are /very/ likely to lose it, thereby being forced to buy a new
    > one, presumably at ¼ the price of the camera itself?
    >
    >

    http://www.cinema5d.com/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=11407&start=0&st=0&sk=t&sd=a
     
    Desk Rabbit, Sep 14, 2010
    #12
  13. thanatoid

    olfart Guest

    "Jenna Tills" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    >
    >
    > Obviously the battery discharges while in the camera. The camera must
    > have a separate CMOS clock and power source to retain settings and date/
    > time. Do as the owners manual says.
    >

    then you have to reset everything before you use the camera. A real PIA if
    you are in a hurry to take some pix.
     
    olfart, Sep 14, 2010
    #13
  14. thanatoid

    Bert Hyman Guest

    In news:b6856$4c8f6d80$ae830970$ "olfart"
    <> wrote:

    >
    > "Jenna Tills" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >>
    >>
    >> Obviously the battery discharges while in the camera. The camera must
    >> have a separate CMOS clock and power source to retain settings and
    >> date/ time. Do as the owners manual says.
    >>

    > then you have to reset everything before you use the camera. A real
    > PIA if you are in a hurry to take some pix.


    Removing the main battery should not affect the camera's settings.

    --
    Bert Hyman St. Paul, MN
     
    Bert Hyman, Sep 14, 2010
    #14
  15. thanatoid

    Jenna Tills Guest

    On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 08:41:25 -0400, olfart wrote:

    > "Jenna Tills" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >>
    >>
    >> Obviously the battery discharges while in the camera. The camera must
    >> have a separate CMOS clock and power source to retain settings and
    >> date/ time. Do as the owners manual says.
    >>

    > then you have to reset everything before you use the camera. A real PIA
    > if you are in a hurry to take some pix.


    You probably should re-read my post.
     
    Jenna Tills, Sep 14, 2010
    #15
  16. thanatoid

    Jenna Tills Guest

    On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 12:57:58 +0000, Bert Hyman wrote:

    > In news:b6856$4c8f6d80$ae830970$ "olfart"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> "Jenna Tills" <> wrote in message
    >> news:p...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Obviously the battery discharges while in the camera. The camera must
    >>> have a separate CMOS clock and power source to retain settings and
    >>> date/ time. Do as the owners manual says.
    >>>

    >> then you have to reset everything before you use the camera. A real PIA
    >> if you are in a hurry to take some pix.

    >
    > Removing the main battery should not affect the camera's settings.


    It usually doesn't. For a period of time anyway. Most have the ability to
    retain settings and date/time long enough to remove the battery and
    recharge it in a separate charger. Some much longer than that. Some might
    have a lithium cell that would hold the settings for a year or longer.
    There really isn't a standard. But if the manual advises you to remove
    the battery while the camera is not in use I would bet that that
    particular camera has the ability to retain its date/time and custom
    settings for a long time.
     
    Jenna Tills, Sep 14, 2010
    #16
  17. thanatoid

    thanatoid Guest

    Jenna Tills <> wrote in
    news:p:

    <snip>

    > Obviously the battery discharges while in the camera.


    That would be quite peculiar for the otherwise impressively
    intelligent Lumix design. All batteries "lose" a tiny amount of
    power *wherever* they are, in the camera, in a drawer, /or/ used
    as a necklace pendant.

    > The camera must have a separate CMOS clock and power source to
    > retain settings and date/ time.


    While the power source is not specified, it must be a tiny
    capacitor, since the camera stores the date (and possibly the
    settings, sadly, that is not mentioned) with the main battery
    removed - for up to 3 months. It could be a tiny button cell,
    they last for 5-10 years so mentioning them is pointless since
    people replace their digital cameras every time another 2 MPs
    become available for the same price.

    > Do as the owners manual says.


    Thank you, but I am trying to think for myself, with the aid of
    the 24hr HELPdesk.

    So far, I have yet to see a single convincing argument FOR
    removing the battery whenever the camera is not on. I /would/
    remove it if I was not going to use the camera for 2 months.


    --
    "Anytime I hear the word "culture", I get on the Internet."
    - a 21st Century Moron
     
    thanatoid, Sep 14, 2010
    #17
  18. thanatoid

    thanatoid Guest

    "olfart" <> wrote in
    news:b6856$4c8f6d80$ae830970$:

    >
    > "Jenna Tills" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >>
    >>
    >> Obviously the battery discharges while in the camera. The
    >> camera must have a separate CMOS clock and power source to
    >> retain settings and date/ time. Do as the owners manual
    >> says.
    >>

    > then you have to reset everything before you use the
    > camera. A real PIA if you are in a hurry to take some pix.


    The Lumix FP-1 has an "intelligent auto" mode which appears to
    work SO well that even /I/ will use it occasionally, Even
    though, actually knowing something about photography, I prefer
    to set all my parameters manually.

    Basically though, your point is very valid.


    --
    "Anytime I hear the word "culture", I get on the Internet."
    - a 21st Century Moron
     
    thanatoid, Sep 14, 2010
    #18
  19. thanatoid

    joevan Guest

    On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 14:59:26 +0000 (UTC), thanatoid
    <> wrote:

    >Jenna Tills <> wrote in
    >news:p:
    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >> Obviously the battery discharges while in the camera.

    >
    >That would be quite peculiar for the otherwise impressively
    >intelligent Lumix design. All batteries "lose" a tiny amount of
    >power *wherever* they are, in the camera, in a drawer, /or/ used
    >as a necklace pendant.
    >
    >> The camera must have a separate CMOS clock and power source to
    >> retain settings and date/ time.

    >
    >While the power source is not specified, it must be a tiny
    >capacitor, since the camera stores the date (and possibly the
    >settings, sadly, that is not mentioned) with the main battery
    >removed - for up to 3 months. It could be a tiny button cell,
    >they last for 5-10 years so mentioning them is pointless since
    >people replace their digital cameras every time another 2 MPs
    >become available for the same price.
    >
    >> Do as the owners manual says.

    >
    >Thank you, but I am trying to think for myself, with the aid of
    >the 24hr HELPdesk.
    >
    >So far, I have yet to see a single convincing argument FOR
    >removing the battery whenever the camera is not on. I /would/
    >remove it if I was not going to use the camera for 2 months.


    >"Anytime I hear the word "culture", I get on the Internet."
    >- a 21st Century Moron

    Why not try yogurt.
     
    joevan, Sep 14, 2010
    #19
  20. thanatoid

    joevan Guest

    On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 14:59:26 +0000 (UTC), thanatoid
    <> wrote:

    >Jenna Tills <> wrote in
    >news:p:
    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >> Obviously the battery discharges while in the camera.

    >
    >That would be quite peculiar for the otherwise impressively
    >intelligent Lumix design. All batteries "lose" a tiny amount of
    >power *wherever* they are, in the camera, in a drawer, /or/ used
    >as a necklace pendant.
    >
    >> The camera must have a separate CMOS clock and power source to
    >> retain settings and date/ time.

    >
    >While the power source is not specified, it must be a tiny
    >capacitor, since the camera stores the date (and possibly the
    >settings, sadly, that is not mentioned) with the main battery
    >removed - for up to 3 months. It could be a tiny button cell,
    >they last for 5-10 years so mentioning them is pointless since
    >people replace their digital cameras every time another 2 MPs
    >become available for the same price.
    >
    >> Do as the owners manual says.

    >
    >Thank you, but I am trying to think for myself, with the aid of
    >the 24hr HELPdesk.
    >
    >So far, I have yet to see a single convincing argument FOR
    >removing the battery whenever the camera is not on. I /would/
    >remove it if I was not going to use the camera for 2 months.


    >"Anytime I hear the word "culture", I get on the Internet."
    >- a 21st Century Moron

    Why not try yogurt.
     
    joevan, Sep 14, 2010
    #20
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