Removal of layers of JPG

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by caddypimp1976@hotmail.com, Nov 8, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I recently had my hard drive crash (physical error on disk itself,
    irrecoverable) and needless to say I lost all of my photos. A few of
    them I had changed around or added clipart or things like that and
    added to myspace or photobucket, but now I want to recover the
    originals. Is there anyway to remove a piece of clipart and text that
    has been placed on photos and restore the original photo underneath, or
    does JPG write over the data?
     
    , Nov 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. Cgiorgio Guest

    <> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:...
    >I recently had my hard drive crash (physical error on disk itself,
    > irrecoverable) and needless to say I lost all of my photos. A few of
    > them I had changed around or added clipart or things like that and
    > added to myspace or photobucket, but now I want to recover the
    > originals. Is there anyway to remove a piece of clipart and text that
    > has been placed on photos and restore the original photo underneath, or
    > does JPG write over the data?
    >

    Unfortunately the .jpg format can not store any layers (most programs will
    tell you that all layers will have to be combined into one when you select
    "Save As - .jpg"
     
    Cgiorgio, Nov 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. AustinMN Guest

    wrote:
    > I recently had my hard drive crash (physical error on disk itself,
    > irrecoverable) and needless to say I lost all of my photos.


    I have only experienced one hard drive crash (I've been a computer
    programmer since 1977), but I lost *nothing*. If it's "needless to
    say," then perhaps you got what you deserved.

    Backups, backups, backups, people. It's relatively cheap insurance for
    what some consider an inevitable failure. Backups have saved my job
    more than once (there are more ways to loose precious data than hard
    drive failure), and all of the greatest business calamities I have ever
    seen are because someone decided "we don't need to back that up."

    You need backups. Now you know.

    Austin
     
    AustinMN, Nov 8, 2006
    #3
  4. Mike Russell Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I recently had my hard drive crash (physical error on disk itself,
    > irrecoverable) and needless to say I lost all of my photos. A few of
    > them I had changed around or added clipart or things like that and
    > added to myspace or photobucket, but now I want to recover the
    > originals. Is there anyway to remove a piece of clipart and text that
    > has been placed on photos and restore the original photo underneath, or
    > does JPG write over the data?


    No one enjoys losing their data like this, and I've known a number of
    talented and smart people who've lost their images this way.

    If there is just a few bad spots on the drive taking out the file system,
    and the drive basically works, you may be able to recover your files using
    software designed for that purpose. I have not compared the various ones
    available, but I've had good luck with one called photorescue
    http://www.datarescue.com/photorescue/

    As far as recovering the jpg originals, one choice is careful use of the
    clone tool to cover over the artwork.
    --

    Mike Russell
    www.curvemeister.com/forum/
     
    Mike Russell, Nov 8, 2006
    #4
  5. Jim Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I recently had my hard drive crash (physical error on disk itself,
    > irrecoverable) and needless to say I lost all of my photos. A few of
    > them I had changed around or added clipart or things like that and
    > added to myspace or photobucket, but now I want to recover the
    > originals. Is there anyway to remove a piece of clipart and text that
    > has been placed on photos and restore the original photo underneath, or
    > does JPG write over the data?
    >

    There is no such thing as a layer in the jpg format. The original images
    have been gone ever since you put all that extraneous stuff on them,
    flattened the file, and saved it as a jpg.

    Jim
     
    Jim, Nov 8, 2006
    #5
  6. Eric Miller Guest

    wrote:
    > I recently had my hard drive crash (physical error on disk itself,
    > irrecoverable) and needless to say I lost all of my photos. A few of
    > them I had changed around or added clipart or things like that and
    > added to myspace or photobucket, but now I want to recover the
    > originals. Is there anyway to remove a piece of clipart and text that
    > has been placed on photos and restore the original photo underneath, or
    > does JPG write over the data?
    >

    Try one of the services that recovers data from damaged hard drives, if
    its worth it to you.

    Eric Miller
     
    Eric Miller, Nov 8, 2006
    #6
  7. SimonLW Guest

    "AustinMN" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > wrote:
    >> I recently had my hard drive crash (physical error on disk itself,
    >> irrecoverable) and needless to say I lost all of my photos.

    >
    > I have only experienced one hard drive crash (I've been a computer
    > programmer since 1977), but I lost *nothing*. If it's "needless to
    > say," then perhaps you got what you deserved.
    >
    > Backups, backups, backups, people. It's relatively cheap insurance for
    > what some consider an inevitable failure. Backups have saved my job
    > more than once (there are more ways to loose precious data than hard
    > drive failure), and all of the greatest business calamities I have ever
    > seen are because someone decided "we don't need to back that up."
    >
    > You need backups. Now you know.
    >
    > Austin
    >

    Indeed. My photos are in three places. Home PC, laptop and DVD copies. I
    plan to get the DVDs in a safe deposite box off site. I don't make any money
    with my photos (well, not much anyway).
    -S
     
    SimonLW, Nov 9, 2006
    #7
  8. jeremy Guest

    "SimonLW" <> wrote in message
    news:4553328d$...
    > "AustinMN" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> wrote:
    >>> I recently had my hard drive crash (physical error on disk itself,
    >>> irrecoverable) and needless to say I lost all of my photos.

    >>
    >> I have only experienced one hard drive crash (I've been a computer
    >> programmer since 1977), but I lost *nothing*. If it's "needless to
    >> say," then perhaps you got what you deserved.
    >>
    >> Backups, backups, backups, people. It's relatively cheap insurance for
    >> what some consider an inevitable failure. Backups have saved my job
    >> more than once (there are more ways to loose precious data than hard
    >> drive failure), and all of the greatest business calamities I have ever
    >> seen are because someone decided "we don't need to back that up."
    >>
    >> You need backups. Now you know.
    >>
    >> Austin
    >>

    > Indeed. My photos are in three places. Home PC, laptop and DVD copies. I
    > plan to get the DVDs in a safe deposite box off site. I don't make any
    > money with my photos (well, not much anyway).
    > -S
    >


    With regard to DVD backups, people that understand these things much better
    than I have cautioned that DVD's standards do not have as much error
    correction as CDs, and that CDs are preferred as backup media for that
    reason.

    Of course, CD is going to be obsolete sooner than DVD will, so this must be
    factored into one's decision as to which medium to use.

    I continue to archive on CD, and I plan to migrate to whatever medium
    becomes in vogue in the future--hopefully something that will be somewhat
    more reliable for backup purposes.
     
    jeremy, Nov 9, 2006
    #8
  9. Scott W Guest

    jeremy wrote:
    > With regard to DVD backups, people that understand these things much

    better
    > than I have cautioned that DVD's standards do not have as much error
    > correction as CDs, and that CDs are preferred as backup media for that
    > reason.


    Please give your source on this as I fear it is our old friend Ken
    Rockwell.

    It is just a common courtesy to tell us when you are referencing K.R.
    this will make it easier to know if we should take it seriously or not.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Nov 9, 2006
    #9
  10. AustinMN Guest

    Scott W wrote:
    > jeremy wrote:
    > > With regard to DVD backups, people that understand these things much

    > better
    > > than I have cautioned that DVD's standards do not have as much error
    > > correction as CDs, and that CDs are preferred as backup media for that
    > > reason.

    >
    > Please give your source on this as I fear it is our old friend Ken
    > Rockwell.
    >
    > It is just a common courtesy to tell us when you are referencing K.R.
    > this will make it easier to know if we should take it seriously or not.


    Indeed. If the error correction is less on DVDs, it is almost certanly
    because a decade of experience with CDs has shown that the old levels
    are not needed.

    It is possible that Video on DVD has less error correction than Audio
    on CD, but that's like complaining that a train has worse gas mileage
    than a bicycle.

    The post jeremy was replying to (which has been snipped along the way)
    was using DVDs as a tertiary backup. Even if the poster lost 10% of
    the data on DVD (a rediculously high number), he would not be relying
    on the DVDs unless he lost *both* his computers, in which case he'd be
    glad for the 90% he got.

    Austin
     
    AustinMN, Nov 9, 2006
    #10
  11. timeOday Guest

    jeremy wrote:

    > Of course, CD is going to be obsolete sooner than DVD will, so this must be
    > factored into one's decision as to which medium to use.
    >


    I don't believe CDs will become obsolete sooner than DVDs. I've never
    seen a DVD data drive that wouldn't handle CDs too.

    Anyways, there are so many CDs now in existence (far more than there
    ever were of any kind of floppy disc or tape), I doubt you'll have
    trouble finding a reader any time within the next 25 years.
     
    timeOday, Nov 10, 2006
    #11
  12. John Turco Guest

    AustinMN wrote:
    >
    > Scott W wrote:
    > > jeremy wrote:
    > > > With regard to DVD backups, people that understand these things much

    > > better
    > > > than I have cautioned that DVD's standards do not have as much error
    > > > correction as CDs, and that CDs are preferred as backup media for that
    > > > reason.

    > >
    > > Please give your source on this as I fear it is our old friend Ken
    > > Rockwell.
    > >
    > > It is just a common courtesy to tell us when you are referencing K.R.
    > > this will make it easier to know if we should take it seriously or not.

    >
    > Indeed. If the error correction is less on DVDs, it is almost certanly
    > because a decade of experience with CDs has shown that the old levels
    > are not needed.
    >
    > It is possible that Video on DVD has less error correction than Audio
    > on CD, but that's like complaining that a train has worse gas mileage
    > than a bicycle.
    >
    > The post jeremy was replying to (which has been snipped along the way)
    > was using DVDs as a tertiary backup. Even if the poster lost 10% of
    > the data on DVD (a rediculously high number), he would not be relying
    > on the DVDs unless he lost *both* his computers, in which case he'd be
    > glad for the 90% he got.
    >
    > Austin



    Hello, Austin:

    If superior error correction is wanted, then, DVD-RAM is required. It
    may still be a bit too expensive, for archival purposes; but, where
    everyday backup is concerned, it's a far better choice than either CD
    or regular DVD.


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
     
    John Turco, Nov 11, 2006
    #12
  13. John Turco Guest

    timeOday wrote:
    >
    > jeremy wrote:
    >
    > > Of course, CD is going to be obsolete sooner than DVD will, so this must be
    > > factored into one's decision as to which medium to use.
    > >

    >
    > I don't believe CDs will become obsolete sooner than DVDs. I've never
    > seen a DVD data drive that wouldn't handle CDs too.
    >
    > Anyways, there are so many CDs now in existence (far more than there
    > ever were of any kind of floppy disc or tape), I doubt you'll have
    > trouble finding a reader any time within the next 25 years.



    Hello, timeOday:

    Are you sure about that? Floppy disks of different formats have been
    around, a lot longer than recordable optical media -- and I'd surmise,
    they've sold in tremendous numbers, over the past several decades.


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
     
    John Turco, Nov 11, 2006
    #13
  14. John Turco wrote:
    []
    > Hello, Austin:
    >
    > If superior error correction is wanted, then, DVD-RAM is required. It
    > may still be a bit too expensive, for archival purposes; but, where
    > everyday backup is concerned, it's a far better choice than either CD
    > or regular DVD.
    >
    >
    > Cordially,
    > John Turco <>


    ... because .... ?
     
    David J Taylor, Nov 11, 2006
    #14
  15. Ray Fischer Guest

    jeremy <> wrote:
    >"SimonLW" <> wrote in message
    >> "AustinMN" <> wrote in message
    >>> wrote:


    >>>> I recently had my hard drive crash (physical error on disk itself,
    >>>> irrecoverable) and needless to say I lost all of my photos.
    >>>
    >>> I have only experienced one hard drive crash (I've been a computer
    >>> programmer since 1977), but I lost *nothing*. If it's "needless to
    >>> say," then perhaps you got what you deserved.
    >>>
    >>> Backups, backups, backups, people. It's relatively cheap insurance for
    >>> what some consider an inevitable failure. Backups have saved my job
    >>> more than once (there are more ways to loose precious data than hard
    >>> drive failure), and all of the greatest business calamities I have ever
    >>> seen are because someone decided "we don't need to back that up."
    >>>
    >>> You need backups. Now you know.
    >>>
    >>> Austin
    >>>

    >> Indeed. My photos are in three places. Home PC, laptop and DVD copies. I
    >> plan to get the DVDs in a safe deposite box off site. I don't make any
    >> money with my photos (well, not much anyway).

    >
    >With regard to DVD backups, people that understand these things much better
    >than I have cautioned that DVD's standards do not have as much error
    >correction as CDs, and that CDs are preferred as backup media for that
    >reason.


    While likely true, DVDs hold the equivalent of about 7 CDs. You can
    make four copies of your photos onto DVDs and still have spent less
    time and effort doing the backup and get more reliability than you
    would from making a single backup to CDs.

    --
    Ray Fischer
     
    Ray Fischer, Nov 11, 2006
    #15
  16. John Turco Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:
    >
    > John Turco wrote:
    > []
    > > Hello, Austin:
    > >
    > > If superior error correction is wanted, then, DVD-RAM is required. It
    > > may still be a bit too expensive, for archival purposes; but, where
    > > everyday backup is concerned, it's a far better choice than either CD
    > > or regular DVD.
    > >
    > >
    > > Cordially,
    > > John Turco <>

    >
    > ... because .... ?



    Hello, David:

    DVD-RAM has the aforementioned, extra error correction, and can be
    accessed as readily as a hard drive or floppy disk, without the need
    for any "packet writing" software kludge. These things combine to
    give it a decided edge over the other DVD formats.

    As to CD-R\CD-RW, it's no contest! They simply lack DVD's storage
    capacity; end of discussion. :)


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
     
    John Turco, Nov 12, 2006
    #16
  17. John Turco wrote:
    []
    > Hello, David:
    >
    > DVD-RAM has the aforementioned, extra error correction, and can be
    > accessed as readily as a hard drive or floppy disk, without the need
    > for any "packet writing" software kludge. These things combine to
    > give it a decided edge over the other DVD formats.
    >
    > As to CD-R\CD-RW, it's no contest! They simply lack DVD's storage
    > capacity; end of discussion. :)
    >
    >
    > Cordially,
    > John Turco <>


    Thanks, John. I /never/ use packet writing, so that wouldn't interest me.
    Do DVD-RAM still come in caddies and require special drives to write them?

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Nov 12, 2006
    #17
  18. Stewy Guest

    In article <>,
    timeOday <> wrote:

    > jeremy wrote:
    >
    > > Of course, CD is going to be obsolete sooner than DVD will, so this must be
    > > factored into one's decision as to which medium to use.
    > >

    >
    > I don't believe CDs will become obsolete sooner than DVDs. I've never
    > seen a DVD data drive that wouldn't handle CDs too.
    >
    > Anyways, there are so many CDs now in existence (far more than there
    > ever were of any kind of floppy disc or tape), I doubt you'll have
    > trouble finding a reader any time within the next 25 years.


    Very true. Of course there are those nay-sayers who'll tell you the
    moment the CD format becomes obsolete you lose all your pictures and you
    should really store them on some HDD somewhere else.

    Any kind of media is prone to becoming corrupt - countless floppies I
    had. Backing up more than once is really the answer.

    About once a year, I put all my pictures back on the HDD from CDR and
    re-sort them into various categories - date taken / subject etc and
    re-burn onto DVDR - I can get around 1000 on a disc.

    Flash memory is still a very expensive source of memory and until we
    start getting HDDs with no moving parts, CDR and DVDR will be THE
    formats for archival storage.
     
    Stewy, Nov 12, 2006
    #18
  19. timeOday Guest

    John Turco wrote:
    > timeOday wrote:
    >
    >>jeremy wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Of course, CD is going to be obsolete sooner than DVD will, so this must be
    >>>factored into one's decision as to which medium to use.
    >>>

    >>
    >>I don't believe CDs will become obsolete sooner than DVDs. I've never
    >>seen a DVD data drive that wouldn't handle CDs too.
    >>
    >>Anyways, there are so many CDs now in existence (far more than there
    >>ever were of any kind of floppy disc or tape), I doubt you'll have
    >>trouble finding a reader any time within the next 25 years.

    >
    >
    >
    > Hello, timeOday:
    >
    > Are you sure about that? Floppy disks of different formats have been
    > around, a lot longer than recordable optical media -- and I'd surmise,
    > they've sold in tremendous numbers, over the past several decades.
    >
    >
    > Cordially,
    > John Turco <>


    I don't have solid numbers, but here's my argument: personal computers
    have exploded in popularity worldwide over the last 10-15 years, and
    CDs have been the #1 removable computer media for most of that period.
    Floppies did have roughly 100% market share for a long time, but there
    were many incompatible floppy formats during that era, and computers as
    a whole were not so widespread then as now. Finally, the backwards
    compatibility of DVD and now HD-DVD drives (which still read CDs) is a
    good thing.
     
    timeOday, Nov 13, 2006
    #19
  20. timeOday Guest

    Stewy wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > timeOday <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>jeremy wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Of course, CD is going to be obsolete sooner than DVD will, so this must be
    >>>factored into one's decision as to which medium to use.
    >>>

    >>
    >>I don't believe CDs will become obsolete sooner than DVDs. I've never
    >>seen a DVD data drive that wouldn't handle CDs too.
    >>
    >>Anyways, there are so many CDs now in existence (far more than there
    >>ever were of any kind of floppy disc or tape), I doubt you'll have
    >>trouble finding a reader any time within the next 25 years.

    >
    >
    > Very true. Of course there are those nay-sayers who'll tell you the
    > moment the CD format becomes obsolete you lose all your pictures and you
    > should really store them on some HDD somewhere else.
    >
    > Any kind of media is prone to becoming corrupt - countless floppies I
    > had. Backing up more than once is really the answer.
    >
    > About once a year, I put all my pictures back on the HDD from CDR and
    > re-sort them into various categories - date taken / subject etc and
    > re-burn onto DVDR - I can get around 1000 on a disc.
    >
    > Flash memory is still a very expensive source of memory and until we
    > start getting HDDs with no moving parts, CDR and DVDR will be THE
    > formats for archival storage.


    Yup. Flash is getting there, though, at least for me. I am amateur,
    and only keep photos I like, and keep them as jpegs. For those who
    simply "must" keep a RAW copy of everything, it will be a lot longer.
     
    timeOday, Nov 13, 2006
    #20
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