Remote Desktop Access

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by =?Utf-8?B?VG9t?=, Jan 27, 2006.

  1. Does anyone know if this is even possible and if so, how to set it up?

    I have a wireless network at home with a Linksys router using a DSL
    connection. I do NOT have a static IP address. I'm wondering if I can
    somehow use remote desktop to access various PC's on my network. I use
    remote desktop all the time but only to access PC's with known IP addresses.
    Can this be done?

    Thanks for the help.
    =?Utf-8?B?VG9t?=, Jan 27, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. If you mean the public IP of your router is not static then look at using a
    free dynamic naming service like No-IP.com that maps a fully qualified
    domain name (FQDN) to your ISPs assigned IP. You then call using the FQDN
    versus the public IP of the router. I use No-IP.com to reach my home LAN so
    I can access it remotely using Secure Shell (SSH) and run Remote Desktop
    through the secure tunnel...

    http://www.no-ip.com

    Otherwise if you mean hosts on you internal private home LAN use dynamic IP
    addressing then generally its best to use a static IP on your network
    particularly when it comes down to port forwarding through a
    firewall/router. Otherwise the RDP host PCs local IP may change which
    negates any port forwarding scheme.

    If you enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP on each PC you can generally access them
    using their network name while on the local LAN...

    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/troubleshoot/netbt.htm

    You could also use this registry hack on each of your PCs so they advertise
    their presence as far as Remote Desktop is concerned...

    Reboot each PC after making the change...
    READ THESE TWO KB ARTICLE FIRST!!!!!!

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;256986


    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;322756


    The hack...


    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;281307

    All those strategies will probably not help when it comes down to port
    forwarding through a firewall/router.

    You might look at the alternate addressing scheme to assign a static IP at
    home and use a DHCP IP elsewhere... That may work for you...

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/learnmore/tips/autoconfig.mspx

    ....or NetSwitcher..

    http://www.netswitcher.com/

    Lastly some wireless access points allow you to assign a DHCP IP address to
    a specific client MAC address. A pseudo static IP if you will. I can do that
    with my Buffalo WBR-G54. That way everytime a wireless client of mine
    accesses my home LAN it gets assigned the same IP address.

    See this page for general help with Remote Desktop...

    http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/LAN/The_Illustrated_Network.html

    --
    Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

    Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the
    mutual benefit of all of us...
    The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    rights...


    "Tom" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Does anyone know if this is even possible and if so, how to set it up?
    >
    > I have a wireless network at home with a Linksys router using a DSL
    > connection. I do NOT have a static IP address. I'm wondering if I can
    > somehow use remote desktop to access various PC's on my network. I use
    > remote desktop all the time but only to access PC's with known IP
    > addresses.
    > Can this be done?
    >
    > Thanks for the help.
    Sooner Al [MVP], Jan 27, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Thanks so much for the information. It looks like I need the "no-ip"
    solution. My router's public IP is dynamically generated.

    If I use this solution and come up with a FQDN from no-ip, then my issue
    will be setting up each PC (3 of them) on the network for remote access. Do
    you know of any how-to document of some sort?

    Thanks again for all the help.


    "Sooner Al [MVP]" wrote:

    > If you mean the public IP of your router is not static then look at using a
    > free dynamic naming service like No-IP.com that maps a fully qualified
    > domain name (FQDN) to your ISPs assigned IP. You then call using the FQDN
    > versus the public IP of the router. I use No-IP.com to reach my home LAN so
    > I can access it remotely using Secure Shell (SSH) and run Remote Desktop
    > through the secure tunnel...
    >
    > http://www.no-ip.com
    >
    > Otherwise if you mean hosts on you internal private home LAN use dynamic IP
    > addressing then generally its best to use a static IP on your network
    > particularly when it comes down to port forwarding through a
    > firewall/router. Otherwise the RDP host PCs local IP may change which
    > negates any port forwarding scheme.
    >
    > If you enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP on each PC you can generally access them
    > using their network name while on the local LAN...
    >
    > http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/troubleshoot/netbt.htm
    >
    > You could also use this registry hack on each of your PCs so they advertise
    > their presence as far as Remote Desktop is concerned...
    >
    > Reboot each PC after making the change...
    > READ THESE TWO KB ARTICLE FIRST!!!!!!
    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;256986
    >
    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;322756
    >
    >
    > The hack...
    >
    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;281307
    >
    > All those strategies will probably not help when it comes down to port
    > forwarding through a firewall/router.
    >
    > You might look at the alternate addressing scheme to assign a static IP at
    > home and use a DHCP IP elsewhere... That may work for you...
    >
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/learnmore/tips/autoconfig.mspx
    >
    > ....or NetSwitcher..
    >
    > http://www.netswitcher.com/
    >
    > Lastly some wireless access points allow you to assign a DHCP IP address to
    > a specific client MAC address. A pseudo static IP if you will. I can do that
    > with my Buffalo WBR-G54. That way everytime a wireless client of mine
    > accesses my home LAN it gets assigned the same IP address.
    >
    > See this page for general help with Remote Desktop...
    >
    > http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/LAN/The_Illustrated_Network.html
    >
    > --
    > Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)
    >
    > Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the
    > mutual benefit of all of us...
    > The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    > rights...
    >
    >
    > "Tom" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Does anyone know if this is even possible and if so, how to set it up?
    > >
    > > I have a wireless network at home with a Linksys router using a DSL
    > > connection. I do NOT have a static IP address. I'm wondering if I can
    > > somehow use remote desktop to access various PC's on my network. I use
    > > remote desktop all the time but only to access PC's with known IP
    > > addresses.
    > > Can this be done?
    > >
    > > Thanks for the help.

    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?VG9t?=, Jan 27, 2006
    #3
  4. You can open multiple ports on your router, ie. one for each PC...

    http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/RemoteDesktop/Multiple_PC_RD.html

    ....or run multiple RDP sessions through a VPN or Secure Shell (SSH) tunnel.
    The advantage of this is you only have one port open on our router.
    Personally I use SSH...

    http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/Ssh/RemoteDesktopSSH.html

    VPN help...

    http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_vpn_server.htm
    http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_vpn.htm

    Lastly you could access one PC, ie. PC1, then from that desktop access PC2,
    then from PC2 access PC3...a "daisy chain" so to speak.

    IMHO the VPN or SSH tunnel method is best. In all cases use *STRONG*
    passwords or in the case of SSH you could use a private/public key pair for
    authentication...

    --
    Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

    Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the
    mutual benefit of all of us...
    The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    rights...


    "Tom" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks so much for the information. It looks like I need the "no-ip"
    > solution. My router's public IP is dynamically generated.
    >
    > If I use this solution and come up with a FQDN from no-ip, then my issue
    > will be setting up each PC (3 of them) on the network for remote access.
    > Do
    > you know of any how-to document of some sort?
    >
    > Thanks again for all the help.
    >
    Sooner Al [MVP], Jan 27, 2006
    #4
  5. That's very helpful. Thanks again for all the great info.
    -Tom

    "Sooner Al [MVP]" wrote:

    > You can open multiple ports on your router, ie. one for each PC...
    >
    > http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/RemoteDesktop/Multiple_PC_RD.html
    >
    > ....or run multiple RDP sessions through a VPN or Secure Shell (SSH) tunnel.
    > The advantage of this is you only have one port open on our router.
    > Personally I use SSH...
    >
    > http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/Ssh/RemoteDesktopSSH.html
    >
    > VPN help...
    >
    > http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_vpn_server.htm
    > http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_vpn.htm
    >
    > Lastly you could access one PC, ie. PC1, then from that desktop access PC2,
    > then from PC2 access PC3...a "daisy chain" so to speak.
    >
    > IMHO the VPN or SSH tunnel method is best. In all cases use *STRONG*
    > passwords or in the case of SSH you could use a private/public key pair for
    > authentication...
    >
    > --
    > Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)
    >
    > Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the
    > mutual benefit of all of us...
    > The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    > rights...
    >
    >
    > "Tom" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Thanks so much for the information. It looks like I need the "no-ip"
    > > solution. My router's public IP is dynamically generated.
    > >
    > > If I use this solution and come up with a FQDN from no-ip, then my issue
    > > will be setting up each PC (3 of them) on the network for remote access.
    > > Do
    > > you know of any how-to document of some sort?
    > >
    > > Thanks again for all the help.
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?VG9t?=, Jan 27, 2006
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. =?Utf-8?B?Qmx1Y2FkZHk3MQ==?=

    Desktop can't access Laptop but Laptop can access desktop

    =?Utf-8?B?Qmx1Y2FkZHk3MQ==?=, Nov 22, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    775
    Chuck
    Nov 23, 2004
  2. Peter Sale
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    11,928
    Robin Walker
    Dec 11, 2004
  3. =?Utf-8?B?Y2FydG1hbg==?=

    Can't access laptop from desktop, but can access desktop from lapt

    =?Utf-8?B?Y2FydG1hbg==?=, Aug 4, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    4,401
    =?Utf-8?B?U3RhcmdhemVy?=
    Aug 6, 2005
  4. Dave Marden
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    10,658
    Dave Marden
    Jan 24, 2004
  5. eddy

    re: remote assistance and remote desktop

    eddy, Sep 20, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,089
    Evan Platt
    Sep 20, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page