Reluctant Wedding Photographer

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Juan Moore Beer, Nov 5, 2007.

  1. My niece has asked me to be her wedding photographer, and it is giving me
    nightmares.

    You know the screnario, two very young kids, in love and in trouble, and
    are getting married on a very tight budget.

    I visited her father last weekend, and she saw a handful of photos I took
    throughout the weekend and decided I was her man.

    Under the circumstances, there is no possibility of refusing, and I would
    only want to because I doubt my ability to make it special.

    As you may know from my very few posts here I am new to the digital arena,
    and my film experience is severely limited and dated.

    I think I know the very basics about what to take with me, (Extra
    batteries, memory, etc.) but would appreciate any free advice.

    My very short list of available equipment is as follows:
    Cameras:
    Canon D400
    Canon Rebel G (I would probably not take this, unles someone convinces me
    otherwise)
    Lenses:
    18-55
    55-200 (From the old Rebel G)
    Kit lense from the rebel G (I forget exactly what that is at the moment)
    Flash
    Canon 430EX
    Tripods (One large and one mini.)

    Is there anything I absolutely must have besides what is listed here?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Dan

    _______________________________________________________________________ 
    : the next generation of web-newsreaders : http://www.recgroups.com
    Juan Moore Beer, Nov 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. Juan Moore Beer

    Mr. Strat Guest

    In article <>, Juan Moore Beer
    <> wrote:

    > I think I know the very basics about what to take with me, (Extra
    > batteries, memory, etc.) but would appreciate any free advice.


    A clue would be helpful.
    Mr. Strat, Nov 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. Juan Moore Beer

    frederick Guest

    Mr. Strat wrote:
    > In article <>, Juan Moore Beer
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> I think I know the very basics about what to take with me, (Extra
    >> batteries, memory, etc.) but would appreciate any free advice.

    >
    > A clue would be helpful.
    >

    Having a bad hair day Mr Strat?

    It seemed like a pretty reasonable post. I'm sure that many
    amateur photogs get asked to do weddings. If you don't
    get asked, perhaps that's a reflection on how people
    perceive your abilities.
    frederick, Nov 5, 2007
    #3
  4. Juan Moore Beer

    Cynicor Guest

    frederick wrote:
    > Mr. Strat wrote:
    >> In article <>, Juan Moore Beer
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I think I know the very basics about what to take with me, (Extra
    >>> batteries, memory, etc.) but would appreciate any free advice.

    >>
    >> A clue would be helpful.
    > >

    > Having a bad hair day Mr Strat?
    >
    > It seemed like a pretty reasonable post. I'm sure that many amateur
    > photogs get asked to do weddings. If you don't get asked, perhaps
    > that's a reflection on how people perceive your abilities.


    It's very simple.

    1. Don't listen to people telling you that you won't know what to do.
    2. Take more photos than you need. You never know what expressions
    you'll get on people's faces, and you can't redo a wedding.
    3. It is important to make the bride and the bride's mother look good.
    No one else matters.
    4. Scout the location out in advance.
    5. Bring two flashes and about 40 AA batteries.
    6. Bring two camera bodies. Have someone else use the other one if
    possible. (I let my 10-year-old daughter use one at the last wedding I
    did, and she ended up with a batch of eye-level photos of the kids there
    that we would not otherwise have had.)
    7. Use the two to three lenses you're most comfortable with, preferably
    with wide apertures.
    8. Bring two or more memory cards, and shoot in RAW.
    9. Talk to everyone in advance to find out what shots they want from you.
    10. Elbow the hell out of everyone to get to the position you want. Make
    sure it's OK to move discreetly around the ceremony, and get the best
    angle.
    11. Don't stuff shrimp into your jacket pockets.
    12. Don't wear a Miami Dolphins mesh half-shirt.
    13. Don't try to catch the bouquet.
    Cynicor, Nov 5, 2007
    #4
  5. Juan Moore Beer

    Pat Guest

    On Nov 5, 3:45 pm, Cynicor <> wrote:
    > frederick wrote:
    > > Mr. Strat wrote:
    > >> In article <>, Juan Moore Beer
    > >> <> wrote:

    >
    > >>> I think I know the very basics about what to take with me, (Extra
    > >>> batteries, memory, etc.) but would appreciate any free advice.

    >
    > >> A clue would be helpful.

    >
    > > Having a bad hair day Mr Strat?

    >
    > > It seemed like a pretty reasonable post. I'm sure that many amateur
    > > photogs get asked to do weddings. If you don't get asked, perhaps
    > > that's a reflection on how people perceive your abilities.

    >
    > It's very simple.
    >
    > 1. Don't listen to people telling you that you won't know what to do.
    > 2. Take more photos than you need. You never know what expressions
    > you'll get on people's faces, and you can't redo a wedding.
    > 3. It is important to make the bride and the bride's mother look good.
    > No one else matters.
    > 4. Scout the location out in advance.
    > 5. Bring two flashes and about 40 AA batteries.
    > 6. Bring two camera bodies. Have someone else use the other one if
    > possible. (I let my 10-year-old daughter use one at the last wedding I
    > did, and she ended up with a batch of eye-level photos of the kids there
    > that we would not otherwise have had.)
    > 7. Use the two to three lenses you're most comfortable with, preferably
    > with wide apertures.
    > 8. Bring two or more memory cards, and shoot in RAW.
    > 9. Talk to everyone in advance to find out what shots they want from you.
    > 10. Elbow the hell out of everyone to get to the position you want. Make
    > sure it's OK to move discreetly around the ceremony, and get the best
    > angle.
    > 11. Don't stuff shrimp into your jacket pockets.
    > 12. Don't wear a Miami Dolphins mesh half-shirt.
    > 13. Don't try to catch the bouquet.


    Rule #1, don't get drunk.
    Rule #2, don't drink at all.

    Take the 2nd camera, load it and get it read, just in case the first
    camera dies. Bring some film.

    Go to the rehearsal and rehearse. It's for you, too. Go over the
    ground rules.

    Get a bracket and get your flash off of your camera. You'll need a
    cord, too. That's a must.

    Bring lots of batteries. They'll overheat before they go dead, and
    that will ruin them.

    Did I say, get a bracket and cable. It's a must.

    Take off of your batteries out of the package and wrap them in rubber
    bands in groups of whatever your flash uses -- probably 4. Throw out
    the old ones as you use them or stick them in a pocket. The rubber
    band is your signal that they are good to go.

    Put rubber bands around your memory cards for the same reason.

    Get a flash bracket and cable. You'll never regret owning one.

    Take charge. Don't be timid. All brides and grooms are like little
    kids and you have to tell them what to do. They are looking for you
    for direction.

    Stick a water bottle in your bag and hand it to the bride as soon as
    the wedding/receiving line is over. She'll be appreciative and it
    makes it look like you know what you're doing because you planned
    that.

    Tell the bride and groom how to dance. They don't know. Tell them to
    face the same way as the other person, not the "normal" opposite way.
    That way you can get two faces instead of the back of a lot of heads.

    Tell the best man and maid of honor to hold the darn glass up as they
    are giving the toast -- the whole time -- so people can get pictures
    instead of a quick raise at the end.

    Don't be jealous. Let other people take pictures of your set-ups.
    But get yours first.

    Don't drink.

    Don't over-pose people and make them look stiff.

    Get a flash bracket and a cord. Did I mention that.

    Get pictures at the tables. tell people to stand up and move to the
    other side if the back of their heads are showing. You don't want
    backs of heads.

    Go introduce yourself to the DJ right in the very beginning and make
    sure you're coordinated with him/her. If he, too, hasn't done a
    wedding before, get a book to go over what you do and when.

    Anticipate the throwing of the bouquet. Get it in the air. Think of
    it as a football.

    Don't panic. Don't drink. And don't think of doing it without a
    flash bracket and cord. Have fun.
    Pat, Nov 5, 2007
    #5
  6. Juan Moore Beer

    Mike Russell Guest

    "Juan Moore Beer" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My niece has asked me to be her wedding photographer, and it is giving me
    > nightmares.


    Good advice from Cynicor. I would add, regarding his 4th point:
    4. Scout the location out in advance.

    Go to the wedding rehearsal, and take large numbers of images. Use bounce
    flash or available light, and have a set of standard poses rehearsed and
    ready. Bride going down the aisle with father, kiss at the altar, cutting
    the cake, first dance, etc. Also have several group shots ready. Each of
    these should, ideally, be written down and gone over with the principals at
    the rehearsal or even earlier. Bring extra batteries, and a spare camera if
    possible. Be bold, and get in people's faces until they start ignoring you,
    which is when you'll get the good "candid" shots.

    For printing, it's hard to beat one of the online services. Upload all the
    images, and send the best 50 percent of the images as 4x6's to the families.
    They can then order larger prints, as necessary, online.
    --
    Mike Russell - www.curvemeister.com
    Mike Russell, Nov 5, 2007
    #6
  7. On Nov 5 2007 3:04 PM, Mr. Strat wrote:

    > In article <>, Juan Moore Beer
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > I think I know the very basics about what to take with me, (Extra
    > > batteries, memory, etc.) but would appreciate any free advice.

    >
    > A clue would be helpful.


    That is what I am hoping for. I tried to explain that I did not have one.

    ________________________________________________________________________ 
    : the next generation of web-newsreaders : http://www.recgroups.com
    Juan Moore Beer, Nov 5, 2007
    #7
  8. Juan Moore Beer

    Ed Mullikin Guest

    "Mike Russell" <-MOVE> wrote in message
    news:MBLXi.14256$...
    > "Juan Moore Beer" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> My niece has asked me to be her wedding photographer, and it is giving me
    >> nightmares.

    >
    > Good advice from Cynicor. I would add, regarding his 4th point:
    > 4. Scout the location out in advance.
    >
    > Go to the wedding rehearsal, and take large numbers of images. Use bounce
    > flash or available light, and have a set of standard poses rehearsed and
    > ready. Bride going down the aisle with father, kiss at the altar, cutting
    > the cake, first dance, etc. Also have several group shots ready. Each of
    > these should, ideally, be written down and gone over with the principals
    > at the rehearsal or even earlier. Bring extra batteries, and a spare
    > camera if possible. Be bold, and get in people's faces until they start
    > ignoring you, which is when you'll get the good "candid" shots.
    >
    > For printing, it's hard to beat one of the online services. Upload all
    > the images, and send the best 50 percent of the images as 4x6's to the
    > families. They can then order larger prints, as necessary, online.
    > --
    > Mike Russell - www.curvemeister.com
    >
    >

    All very very good advice! DO NOT BE TIMID! YOU have been given a job to
    do.
    Ed Mullikin, Nov 5, 2007
    #8
  9. Juan Moore Beer

    Pat Guest

    On Nov 5, 4:06 pm, "Mike Russell" <-
    MOVE> wrote:
    > "Juan Moore Beer" <> wrote in messagenews:...
    >
    > > My niece has asked me to be her wedding photographer, and it is giving me
    > > nightmares.

    >
    > Good advice from Cynicor. I would add, regarding his 4th point:
    > 4. Scout the location out in advance.
    >
    > Go to the wedding rehearsal, and take large numbers of images. Use bounce
    > flash or available light, and have a set of standard poses rehearsed and
    > ready. Bride going down the aisle with father, kiss at the altar, cutting
    > the cake, first dance, etc. Also have several group shots ready. Each of
    > these should, ideally, be written down and gone over with the principals at
    > the rehearsal or even earlier. Bring extra batteries, and a spare camera if
    > possible. Be bold, and get in people's faces until they start ignoring you,
    > which is when you'll get the good "candid" shots.
    >
    > For printing, it's hard to beat one of the online services. Upload all the
    > images, and send the best 50 percent of the images as 4x6's to the families.
    > They can then order larger prints, as necessary, online.
    > --
    > Mike Russell -www.curvemeister.com


    To clarify (I hope) what Mike said, doubt if meant "standard poses"
    but instead meant "standard shots". You really don't want to pose
    things like that, for a number of reasons.

    Mike also suggested using a bounce flash or natural light, if
    possible. That is good advice, but I'm not sure you'll want to do
    that on your first wedding. For a novice, I don't think it would be
    out of line to shoot straight on with a flash (on a bracket) with no
    diffuser, no nothing.. He has too many other things to pay attention
    to.

    As for an on-line service, only use one that uses Kodak (and
    preferably Kodak professional) processing. It's that much better for
    portraiture.
    Pat, Nov 5, 2007
    #9
  10. Juan Moore Beer

    Sparky Guest

    On Nov 5, 4:24 pm, Pat <> wrote:
    > On Nov 5, 4:06 pm, "Mike Russell" <-
    >
    >
    >
    > MOVE> wrote:
    > > "Juan Moore Beer" <> wrote in messagenews:...

    >
    > > > My niece has asked me to be her wedding photographer, and it is giving me
    > > > nightmares.

    >
    > > Good advice from Cynicor. I would add, regarding his 4th point:
    > > 4. Scout the location out in advance.

    >
    > > Go to the wedding rehearsal, and take large numbers of images. Use bounce
    > > flash or available light, and have a set of standard poses rehearsed and
    > > ready. Bride going down the aisle with father, kiss at the altar, cutting
    > > the cake, first dance, etc. Also have several group shots ready. Each of
    > > these should, ideally, be written down and gone over with the principals at
    > > the rehearsal or even earlier. Bring extra batteries, and a spare camera if
    > > possible. Be bold, and get in people's faces until they start ignoring you,
    > > which is when you'll get the good "candid" shots.

    >
    > > For printing, it's hard to beat one of the online services. Upload all the
    > > images, and send the best 50 percent of the images as 4x6's to the families.
    > > They can then order larger prints, as necessary, online.
    > > --
    > > Mike Russell -www.curvemeister.com

    >
    > To clarify (I hope) what Mike said, doubt if meant "standard poses"
    > but instead meant "standard shots". You really don't want to pose
    > things like that, for a number of reasons.
    >
    > Mike also suggested using a bounce flash or natural light, if
    > possible. That is good advice, but I'm not sure you'll want to do
    > that on your first wedding. For a novice, I don't think it would be
    > out of line to shoot straight on with a flash (on a bracket) with no
    > diffuser, no nothing.. He has too many other things to pay attention
    > to.
    >
    > As for an on-line service, only use one that uses Kodak (and
    > preferably Kodak professional) processing. It's that much better for
    > portraiture.


    if you knew more about what the landscape was like and how the wedding
    would go would that would help you
    Sparky, Nov 6, 2007
    #10
  11. Juan Moore Beer

    Sparky Guest

    On Nov 5, 4:24 pm, Pat <> wrote:
    > On Nov 5, 4:06 pm, "Mike Russell" <-
    >
    >
    >
    > MOVE> wrote:
    > > "Juan Moore Beer" <> wrote in messagenews:...

    >
    > > > My niece has asked me to be her wedding photographer, and it is giving me
    > > > nightmares.

    >
    > > Good advice from Cynicor. I would add, regarding his 4th point:
    > > 4. Scout the location out in advance.

    >
    > > Go to the wedding rehearsal, and take large numbers of images. Use bounce
    > > flash or available light, and have a set of standard poses rehearsed and
    > > ready. Bride going down the aisle with father, kiss at the altar, cutting
    > > the cake, first dance, etc. Also have several group shots ready. Each of
    > > these should, ideally, be written down and gone over with the principals at
    > > the rehearsal or even earlier. Bring extra batteries, and a spare camera if
    > > possible. Be bold, and get in people's faces until they start ignoring you,
    > > which is when you'll get the good "candid" shots.

    >
    > > For printing, it's hard to beat one of the online services. Upload all the
    > > images, and send the best 50 percent of the images as 4x6's to the families.
    > > They can then order larger prints, as necessary, online.
    > > --
    > > Mike Russell -www.curvemeister.com

    >
    > To clarify (I hope) what Mike said, doubt if meant "standard poses"
    > but instead meant "standard shots". You really don't want to pose
    > things like that, for a number of reasons.
    >
    > Mike also suggested using a bounce flash or natural light, if
    > possible. That is good advice, but I'm not sure you'll want to do
    > that on your first wedding. For a novice, I don't think it would be
    > out of line to shoot straight on with a flash (on a bracket) with no
    > diffuser, no nothing.. He has too many other things to pay attention
    > to.
    >
    > As for an on-line service, only use one that uses Kodak (and
    > preferably Kodak professional) processing. It's that much better for
    > portraiture.


    oh and if you want to look professional dont look like you care much
    about who's view your blocking...
    dont be shy... take lots of pics, who knows one of those extra shots
    might be your best
    Sparky, Nov 6, 2007
    #11
  12. Juan Moore Beer

    Mr. Strat Guest

    In article <1194293950.153754@ftpsrv1>, frederick <> wrote:

    > Having a bad hair day Mr Strat?


    Yuk...yuk...

    > It seemed like a pretty reasonable post. I'm sure that many
    > amateur photogs get asked to do weddings. If you don't
    > get asked, perhaps that's a reflection on how people
    > perceive your abilities.


    I closed the studio in 1995 after photographing 600-700 weddings, yet I
    still get people asking if I do weddings/portraits. I think I've done
    enough.
    Mr. Strat, Nov 6, 2007
    #12
  13. Juan Moore Beer

    Mr. Strat Guest

    In article <>, Cynicor
    <> wrote:

    > 1. Don't listen to people telling you that you won't know what to do.
    > 2. Take more photos than you need. You never know what expressions
    > you'll get on people's faces, and you can't redo a wedding.
    > 3. It is important to make the bride and the bride's mother look good.
    > No one else matters.
    > 4. Scout the location out in advance.
    > 5. Bring two flashes and about 40 AA batteries.
    > 6. Bring two camera bodies. Have someone else use the other one if
    > possible. (I let my 10-year-old daughter use one at the last wedding I
    > did, and she ended up with a batch of eye-level photos of the kids there
    > that we would not otherwise have had.)
    > 7. Use the two to three lenses you're most comfortable with, preferably
    > with wide apertures.
    > 8. Bring two or more memory cards, and shoot in RAW.
    > 9. Talk to everyone in advance to find out what shots they want from you.
    > 10. Elbow the hell out of everyone to get to the position you want. Make
    > sure it's OK to move discreetly around the ceremony, and get the best
    > angle.
    > 11. Don't stuff shrimp into your jacket pockets.
    > 12. Don't wear a Miami Dolphins mesh half-shirt.
    > 13. Don't try to catch the bouquet.


    Make sure you put that flash right on the camera and set everything to
    AUTO.
    Mr. Strat, Nov 6, 2007
    #13
  14. Juan Moore Beer

    Mr. Strat Guest

    In article <>, Juan Moore Beer
    <> wrote:

    > That is what I am hoping for. I tried to explain that I did not have one.


    Then you should be a guest instead of *the* photographer.
    Mr. Strat, Nov 6, 2007
    #14
  15. Juan Moore Beer

    Morton Guest

    Juan Moore Beer wrote:
    > My niece has asked me to be her wedding photographer, and it is giving me
    > nightmares.
    >
    > You know the screnario, two very young kids, in love and in trouble, and
    > are getting married on a very tight budget.
    >
    > I visited her father last weekend, and she saw a handful of photos I took
    > throughout the weekend and decided I was her man.
    >
    > Under the circumstances, there is no possibility of refusing, and I would
    > only want to because I doubt my ability to make it special.
    >
    > As you may know from my very few posts here I am new to the digital arena,
    > and my film experience is severely limited and dated.
    >
    > I think I know the very basics about what to take with me, (Extra
    > batteries, memory, etc.) but would appreciate any free advice.
    >
    > My very short list of available equipment is as follows:
    > Cameras:
    > Canon D400
    > Canon Rebel G (I would probably not take this, unles someone convinces me
    > otherwise)
    > Lenses:
    > 18-55
    > 55-200 (From the old Rebel G)
    > Kit lense from the rebel G (I forget exactly what that is at the moment)
    > Flash
    > Canon 430EX
    > Tripods (One large and one mini.)
    >
    > Is there anything I absolutely must have besides what is listed here?
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Dan
    >
    > _______________________________________________________________________
    > : the next generation of web-newsreaders : http://www.recgroups.com
    >

    Hi,

    Remember to do close ups of small things: wedding cake including couple
    on top, knife and server for cake, place cards, kids faces. Also, take
    the obligatory shots of each table showing all the guests' faces. Back
    up the memory cards as soon as the shooting is over; you don't want a
    computer or printer to delete any photos.
    Good luck.

    Morton
    Morton, Nov 6, 2007
    #15
  16. Juan Moore Beer

    Brian Guest


    > Remember to do close ups of small things: wedding cake including couple
    > on top, knife and server for cake, place cards, kids faces. Also, take
    > the obligatory shots of each table showing all the guests' faces. Back
    > up the memory cards as soon as the shooting is over; you don't want a
    > computer or printer to delete any photos.
    > Good luck.
    >
    > Morton


    Good points about the "small things."

    The rings:

    http://tinyurl.com/2jyfme

    The outside of the church.

    Get a shot of the bride and groom looking at their rings. Preferably in
    available light next to a window or stain glass window:

    http://tinyurl.com/345knz

    Get a partner, specifically the opposite sex so they can go into their
    respective sex dressing room. Pictures of the best man helping the
    groom get dressed. Straightening the tie....

    And yes, I second the flash bracket and sync cord.

    Good luck.

    Brian

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    Brian J. Rueger "Who dares wins"
    Capt.(Ret)/Paramedic Hampton, VA.
    B.S.Comm/I/Pilot MSgt, USAF (Ret.) 49199
    Check out my personal home page: http://members.cox.net/brueger
    Check out my photography: http://www.usefilm.com/member/skypilot
    Check out some of my other photography: http://tinyurl.com/or7kc
    "Life's too short to drink LITE beer!"
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    Brian, Nov 6, 2007
    #16
  17. On Nov 5 2007 8:51 PM, Mr. Strat wrote:

    > In article <>, Juan Moore Beer
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > That is what I am hoping for. I tried to explain that I did not have one.

    >
    > Then you should be a guest instead of *the* photographer.


    I don't get it. I tried to explain the circumstances surrounding this
    wedding, then even agreed with you after your little slam to my very
    honest request.

    I am not suggesting that I can be as great as you are in 8 weeks. Nor am
    I taking any money from you or a fellow professional. If these pictures
    aren't taken by Uncle Dan, it will be by little brother Robbie and his
    camera phone or not at all.

    These photos will not be of a quality that some of you take for granted
    and I suspect you would find the final product to be laughable. I will
    miss a lot of important moments, but the photos will be taken with as much
    care as I am able to understand between now and then, and they will be
    taken with the love an Uncle has for a terrific niece in need.

    Is it just that I am a rank amateur cluttering up the group? It seems to
    me that it should be more palatable than the guys selling shoes. Maybe
    any posting amateurs should start each subject with "I don't know shit
    but...", so that you can filter us all out.

    Really, I just love my small time type of photography and am trying to get
    a little better.

    You got a problem with that?

    ______________________________________________________________________ 
    RecGroups : the community-oriented newsreader : www.recgroups.com
    Juan Moore Beer, Nov 6, 2007
    #17
  18. Juan Moore Beer wrote:
    > These photos will not be of a quality that some of you take for
    > granted and I suspect you would find the final product to be
    > laughable. I will miss a lot of important moments, but the photos
    > will be taken with as much care as I am able to understand between
    > now and then, and they will be taken with the love an Uncle has for a
    > terrific niece in need.


    I salute you! I takes guts to stand up like this and speak out against the
    madness of "the perfect day". It seems indeed that people forgot what that
    day is about. It is not about the most expensive rings or the largest number
    of guests or the most elaborate gown. After all there is no law against
    wedding in jeans and t-shirt with photos taken with a cell phone. Although I
    have to admit that it's probably a better idea to dress up a little bit and
    bring a real camera.

    I am sure with your love as an uncle you will be much more important to her
    than a famous photographer charging 5000$ could ever be.

    jue
    Jürgen Exner, Nov 6, 2007
    #18
  19. Juan Moore Beer

    Chris W Guest

    Juan Moore Beer wrote:

    > I don't get it. I tried to explain the circumstances surrounding this
    > wedding, then even agreed with you after your little slam to my very
    > honest request.


    Anyone who read your post, has even the most basic understanding of the
    human condition, and was willing and able to give you advice, would have
    done just that.

    Mr Strat, may or may not be a good photographer, I don't know and I
    don't care. What I do know is that either he didn't read your post,
    can't read, or is simply an inept clueless moron. In any case, he is
    clearly the one who needs to get a clue.


    --
    Chris W
    KE5GIX

    "Protect your digital freedom and privacy, eliminate DRM,
    learn more at http://www.defectivebydesign.org/what_is_drm"

    Ham Radio Repeater Database.
    http://hrrdb.com
    Chris W, Nov 6, 2007
    #19
  20. Juan Moore Beer

    Mr. Strat Guest

    In article <>, Juan Moore Beer
    <> wrote:

    > You got a problem with that?


    I've got a problem with unqualified people photographing
    once-in-a-lifetime events. I've seen way too many instances where
    they've screwed it up.
    Mr. Strat, Nov 6, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

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