Reliability and Performance Monitor

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Mike, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    I don't know so be easy with me. I have Vista Home Premium
    In the Administrative tools of the start menu it has Reliability and
    Performance monitor, in there it has resource overview. In the CPU section
    it has 2 levels, I guess that one is the amount of CPU that is being used at
    that time. My question is what is the Maximum Frequency. Mine is ALWAYS at
    100%. I have and Intel E8400 Duo Core 2 processor 1333Mhz, 3.0 Ghz.
    Thanks in advance
    Mike
     
    Mike, Mar 30, 2008
    #1
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  2. Mike

    mikeyhsd Guest

    might be caused by your choice of power options plan.

    if not using balanced or power save mode.







    "Mike" <> wrote in message news:...
    I don't know so be easy with me. I have Vista Home Premium
    In the Administrative tools of the start menu it has Reliability and
    Performance monitor, in there it has resource overview. In the CPU section
    it has 2 levels, I guess that one is the amount of CPU that is being used at
    that time. My question is what is the Maximum Frequency. Mine is ALWAYS at
    100%. I have and Intel E8400 Duo Core 2 processor 1333Mhz, 3.0 Ghz.
    Thanks in advance
    Mike
     
    mikeyhsd, Mar 30, 2008
    #2
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  3. This means that your CPU is running at it's fastest speed. Modern CPUs can
    be "throttled" to run slower and cooler when there's not much going on, or
    when you're trying to save power (such as on a laptop). If you set your
    Power options to Balanced or Power Saver, your CPU frequency will be
    reduced. But if you choose High Performance, your CPU will always run at its
    maximum frequency. That's not, in and of itself, a problem. Most desktops
    are set to high performance, and I run my laptop on high performance when
    I'm plugged in. But when I'm on battery, I set it for Power Saver and live
    with slightly lower performance in order to maximize my battery life.

    If your CPU is virtually always running at a low utilization, but at full
    frequency, you might be able to change to Balanced or Power Saver without
    noticing a significant performance degradation. And you will use less power.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel


    "Mike" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I don't know so be easy with me. I have Vista Home Premium
    > In the Administrative tools of the start menu it has Reliability and
    > Performance monitor, in there it has resource overview. In the CPU section
    > it has 2 levels, I guess that one is the amount of CPU that is being used
    > at that time. My question is what is the Maximum Frequency. Mine is ALWAYS
    > at 100%. I have and Intel E8400 Duo Core 2 processor 1333Mhz, 3.0 Ghz.
    > Thanks in advance
    > Mike
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Apr 2, 2008
    #3
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