Red Screen Monitor

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by deiopajw, Dec 23, 2005.

  1. deiopajw

    deiopajw Guest

    I have this sudden problem with my monitor. It displays a red colour. I can
    see the text / graphics but it is tinged with a red colour. The monitor
    settings are fine. I have tried restarting the computer but no success. I
    however did discover a virus (Swizzor trojan) and have deleted it. Not sure
    if this virus is the cause.
    Is there something in the registry I can tweak to solve this frustrating
    problem ?
    deiopajw, Dec 23, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. deiopajw

    Robert Baer Guest

    deiopajw wrote:
    > I have this sudden problem with my monitor. It displays a red colour. I can
    > see the text / graphics but it is tinged with a red colour. The monitor
    > settings are fine. I have tried restarting the computer but no success. I
    > however did discover a virus (Swizzor trojan) and have deleted it. Not sure
    > if this virus is the cause.
    > Is there something in the registry I can tweak to solve this frustrating
    > problem ?
    >
    >

    As they say, it is a hardware problem, not a software problem.
    If you do not mind digging into the monitor (up to 30,000 volts even
    if off for months) then it can be fixed.
    If you take to a shop for fixing, the charge will be over half of a
    new one and more than for a used one.
    I have fixed dozens of these and thsy last for years before the same
    problem (usually different color or colors), and i fix them again.
    I have described the nature of the problem and how to fix it many
    times on various NGs.
    Robert Baer, Dec 24, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. deiopajw

    JANA Guest

    There is most likely a fault in the monitor. With the CRT monitors, as the
    tube ages, the colour temperature can start to drift out of specs. Most of
    the time, it is better value to replace the monitor rather than to have it
    serviced.

    There is not very much you can service yourself in monitors. There are no
    user serviceable parts inside. When something changes, it is not an
    adjustment. It is a failure of something.

    Venturing in to a monitor is not something that is recommended, unless you
    are properly equipped, trained, and have the proper service information.
    There are serious safety issues to be concerned with when working in
    monitors.

    --

    JANA
    _____


    "deiopajw" <> wrote in message
    news:43ac7e52$0$18200$...
    I have this sudden problem with my monitor. It displays a red colour. I can
    see the text / graphics but it is tinged with a red colour. The monitor
    settings are fine. I have tried restarting the computer but no success. I
    however did discover a virus (Swizzor trojan) and have deleted it. Not sure
    if this virus is the cause.
    Is there something in the registry I can tweak to solve this frustrating
    problem ?
    JANA, Dec 24, 2005
    #3
  4. deiopajw

    Robert Baer Guest

    JANA wrote:
    > There is most likely a fault in the monitor. With the CRT monitors, as the
    > tube ages, the colour temperature can start to drift out of specs. Most of
    > the time, it is better value to replace the monitor rather than to have it
    > serviced.
    >
    > There is not very much you can service yourself in monitors. There are no
    > user serviceable parts inside. When something changes, it is not an
    > adjustment. It is a failure of something.
    >
    > Venturing in to a monitor is not something that is recommended, unless you
    > are properly equipped, trained, and have the proper service information.
    > There are serious safety issues to be concerned with when working in
    > monitors.
    >

    "color temerature drift out of specs"?????
    Horsemanure!
    Robert Baer, Dec 25, 2005
    #4
  5. deiopajw

    JANA Guest

    Colour temperature on a monitor can drift out of specs, if the CRT is going
    weak, or if there is a drive or bias problem in the circuits that feed the
    CRT. The most common problem is that the CRT goes weak.

    For a well detailed writeup about CRT's used in TV and monitor equipment,
    visit http://arcadecontrols.com/files/Miscellaneous/crtfaq.htm

    ______________________________________________

    CRT Degradation
    CRT Aging - Effects on Electrical Characteristics and Performance
    (From: Jeroen H. Stessen ().)
    Specifications for Philips CRTs can be found in the regular series of data
    books from Philips Components. Companies and universities usually have them.
    Usually the data sheets show typical Ik/Vk characteristics. They also list
    the spread on cutoff voltage and cathode gain, and this spread is quite
    large even on new CRTs. They also list phosphor sensitivity (Lum/Ik), this
    too has a large spread. But they almost never list anything about the aging
    process.

    Here are some of the effects:

    a.. Phosphor ages due to burn-in, particularly on static pictures, this is
    immediately obvious on visual inspection. If the aging is even (no pattern)
    then at least the efficiency is reduced.
    b.. Cathodes age due to loss of emission material, particularly for oxide
    cathodes. The central part of the cathode surface has carried the most
    current density and will wear out first. The surrounding area takes over,
    this will lead to an unsharp picture. Adjusting the focus voltage will not
    really improve it. The tube is worn out.
    c.. Also poisoning of cathode surface may occur. This can be cured
    temporarily by short-time overheating ("re-conditioning").
    d.. The cathode that wears out first (often the red one) also loses gain,
    so the white point of the image will shift (to cyan). The white point can be
    re-adjusted with the gain potentiometers and the contrast, but peak
    brightness will not be as high as new.
    e.. The cutoff voltages of all cathodes will drift. Common drift is
    adjusted by the user by controlling the brightness. Different drift leads to
    a coloration of the black background level. In extreme cases vertical
    flyback lines will appear. Cutoff voltage can be adjusted with
    potentiometers, or there is automatic stabilisation. Still, the VG2 (screen)
    may need periodic adjustment too.
    f.. Leakage currents may disturb VG2 and focus voltage, re-adjustment has
    only a temporary effect.
    g.. VG2 and focus potentiometers may wear out due to electromigration etc.
    A hole may form under the wiper, re-adjustment is then impossible.
    h.. Some types of cathode wear (according to a friend in Philips
    Semiconductors) can cause the Ik/Vk transfer characteristic to divert so
    much from an ideal gamma function that no adjustment can compensate for it.
    Then the tube is really worn out.
    I hope that this helps you to distinguish between a really worn out tube and
    one that still has some life in it after re-adjustment.


    ____________________________________________


    It is best to engage your brain before operating your mouth!!!

    --

    JANA
    _____


    "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    news:qptrf.2885$...
    JANA wrote:
    > There is most likely a fault in the monitor. With the CRT monitors, as the
    > tube ages, the colour temperature can start to drift out of specs. Most of
    > the time, it is better value to replace the monitor rather than to have it
    > serviced.
    >
    > There is not very much you can service yourself in monitors. There are no
    > user serviceable parts inside. When something changes, it is not an
    > adjustment. It is a failure of something.
    >
    > Venturing in to a monitor is not something that is recommended, unless you
    > are properly equipped, trained, and have the proper service information.
    > There are serious safety issues to be concerned with when working in
    > monitors.
    >

    "color temerature drift out of specs"?????
    Horsemanure!
    JANA, Dec 25, 2005
    #5
  6. deiopajw

    Jerry G. Guest

    Jana is right!

    The following is for everyone who is interested.

    A CRT has 3 electron guns, each for each of its primary colour, red, green,
    and glue. In the modern CRT's the colour guns are in one assembly, and
    referred to as a single electron gun. In this case, they each have their own
    control grid, and each have their own cathode. They share the same screen,
    accelerator grid, and focus grid.

    As the CRT is used, the cathodes wear down, and thus the emission is
    lowered. They do not necessarily wear down at the same rate. Also there is
    some phosphor wear as well. Each electron beam falls in to its own phosphor
    dots or stripes, depending on the type of CRT.

    As the CRT emissions, are decreasing with age, there are some circuits
    involved to compensate, and thus maintain the colour temperature. There are
    circuits involved that measure the cathode currents and compare them to a
    reference. As there is wear, the cathode current will decrease. Eventually
    the cathodes will wear down to the point where it is not possible to get
    more emission out of the electron gun assembly cathodes. At this point,
    visible colour drift will start to be apparent. This colour drift is in
    effect the colour temperature that is viewed on the screen.

    Inside of the monitor there are some bias and drive set-ups to adjust the
    electron gun drive circuits to match as exact as possible to the particular
    CRT when the monitor was manufactured. In the modern monitors, these
    adjustments are software setup, and there are no mechanical pots, as like in
    the older monitors. If these adjustments have to be tweaked, then there is a
    fault condition, since they should have been properly set up when the
    monitor was manufactured. The automatic bias circuits are supposed to
    compensate for the offsets of the CRT aging. If a monitor can be made to
    look good after doing some extra tweaking, the fix will only be temporary,
    since there has to be a fault condition.

    Also, when the CRT wears down, the sharpness will also decrease. This is
    because the overall beam current is decreased, and thus the electron beam
    width gets wider. Sometimes adjusting the focus supply to the CRT will
    temporarily fix the problem. This is because by raising the focus voltage a
    little, the beam current will be increased.

    As the tube ages, its overall brightness will also decrease. This where
    when a monitor gets older, the brightness controls has to be turned up a
    little. If the colour guns age evenly, then the colour temperature will not
    have so much drift, as there will be a decrease in the overall brightness
    displayed. Sometimes the service tech will turn up the screen bias to
    compensate for this. In effect, the screen grid voltage is being increased
    to force more emission out of the CRT. This actually accelerates the wearing
    of the electron gun assembly, and thus hastens the CRT's failure.
    Overdriving the screen grid voltage, will also produce visible vertical
    blanking lines. This is because the reference bias for the blanking
    insertion is exceeded for the CRT's design.

    --

    Back the early 70's I worked in R&D for television monitor and receiver
    design at RCA.

    --

    Jerry G.
    ======


    "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    news:qptrf.2885$...
    JANA wrote:
    > There is most likely a fault in the monitor. With the CRT monitors, as the
    > tube ages, the colour temperature can start to drift out of specs. Most of
    > the time, it is better value to replace the monitor rather than to have it
    > serviced.
    >
    > There is not very much you can service yourself in monitors. There are no
    > user serviceable parts inside. When something changes, it is not an
    > adjustment. It is a failure of something.
    >
    > Venturing in to a monitor is not something that is recommended, unless you
    > are properly equipped, trained, and have the proper service information.
    > There are serious safety issues to be concerned with when working in
    > monitors.
    >

    "color temerature drift out of specs"?????
    Horsemanure!
    Jerry G., Dec 25, 2005
    #6
  7. deiopajw

    nos1eep Guest

    On Sat, 24 Dec 2005 09:48:44 +1100, "deiopajw" <>
    spewed the following drivel:

    <I have this sudden problem with my monitor. It displays a red colour.
    I can
    <see the text / graphics but it is tinged with a red colour. The
    monitor
    <settings are fine. I have tried restarting the computer but no
    success. I
    <however did discover a virus (Swizzor trojan) and have deleted it.
    Not sure
    <if this virus is the cause.
    <Is there something in the registry I can tweak to solve this
    frustrating
    <problem ?
    Monitor is fucked, replace it.
    --

    -nos1eep

    Q. What's the difference between a brown-noser and a shit-head?
    A. Depth perception.

    -Scaling up the heights of folly.
    -non est ponenda pluritas sine necessitate
    nos1eep, Dec 25, 2005
    #7
  8. deiopajw

    Robert Baer Guest

    JANA wrote:
    > Colour temperature on a monitor can drift out of specs, if the CRT is going
    > weak, or if there is a drive or bias problem in the circuits that feed the
    > CRT. The most common problem is that the CRT goes weak.
    >
    > For a well detailed writeup about CRT's used in TV and monitor equipment,
    > visit http://arcadecontrols.com/files/Miscellaneous/crtfaq.htm
    >
    > ______________________________________________
    >
    > CRT Degradation
    > CRT Aging - Effects on Electrical Characteristics and Performance
    > (From: Jeroen H. Stessen ().)
    > Specifications for Philips CRTs can be found in the regular series of data
    > books from Philips Components. Companies and universities usually have them.
    > Usually the data sheets show typical Ik/Vk characteristics. They also list
    > the spread on cutoff voltage and cathode gain, and this spread is quite
    > large even on new CRTs. They also list phosphor sensitivity (Lum/Ik), this
    > too has a large spread. But they almost never list anything about the aging
    > process.
    >
    > Here are some of the effects:
    >
    > a.. Phosphor ages due to burn-in, particularly on static pictures, this is
    > immediately obvious on visual inspection. If the aging is even (no pattern)
    > then at least the efficiency is reduced.
    > b.. Cathodes age due to loss of emission material, particularly for oxide
    > cathodes. The central part of the cathode surface has carried the most
    > current density and will wear out first. The surrounding area takes over,
    > this will lead to an unsharp picture. Adjusting the focus voltage will not
    > really improve it. The tube is worn out.
    > c.. Also poisoning of cathode surface may occur. This can be cured
    > temporarily by short-time overheating ("re-conditioning").
    > d.. The cathode that wears out first (often the red one) also loses gain,
    > so the white point of the image will shift (to cyan). The white point can be
    > re-adjusted with the gain potentiometers and the contrast, but peak
    > brightness will not be as high as new.
    > e.. The cutoff voltages of all cathodes will drift. Common drift is
    > adjusted by the user by controlling the brightness. Different drift leads to
    > a coloration of the black background level. In extreme cases vertical
    > flyback lines will appear. Cutoff voltage can be adjusted with
    > potentiometers, or there is automatic stabilisation. Still, the VG2 (screen)
    > may need periodic adjustment too.
    > f.. Leakage currents may disturb VG2 and focus voltage, re-adjustment has
    > only a temporary effect.
    > g.. VG2 and focus potentiometers may wear out due to electromigration etc.
    > A hole may form under the wiper, re-adjustment is then impossible.
    > h.. Some types of cathode wear (according to a friend in Philips
    > Semiconductors) can cause the Ik/Vk transfer characteristic to divert so
    > much from an ideal gamma function that no adjustment can compensate for it.
    > Then the tube is really worn out.
    > I hope that this helps you to distinguish between a really worn out tube and
    > one that still has some life in it after re-adjustment.
    >
    >
    > ____________________________________________
    >
    >
    > It is best to engage your brain before operating your mouth!!!
    >

    As i said, "horsemanure".
    In *all* cases where a color (or colors) flickered or went out, it
    was due to an intermittent or open at the CRT socket in the back.
    The solder is under constant stress due to a sponge on the back of
    the monitor case pressing against the metal cage around the PCB that
    connects to the CRT.
    I unsolder the cage (3-5 places), untwist the unsoldered tabs, and
    remove the cage.
    Then i always remove the solder that is on all of the socket pins
    (and there is lots of solder globbed on), and flow fresh solder on
    making a bright hot solder connection in all places.
    Next i put the cage back on and re-solder it; do not bother twisting
    the tabs as that weakens them further - and i may need to repeat the
    procedure 3-8 years down line.
    I have repaired many monitors this way and used some for well over 10
    years and sold some and others were repairs for other owners.
    Robert Baer, Dec 26, 2005
    #8
  9. deiopajw

    Julia Set Guest

    Re: Re: Red Screen Monitor

    On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 08:59:15 GMT, Robert Baer
    <> wrote:

    >JANA wrote:
    >> Colour temperature on a monitor can drift out of specs, if the CRT is going
    >> weak, or if there is a drive or bias problem in the circuits that feed the
    >> CRT. The most common problem is that the CRT goes weak.
    >>
    >> For a well detailed writeup about CRT's used in TV and monitor equipment,
    >> visit http://arcadecontrols.com/files/Miscellaneous/crtfaq.htm
    >>
    >> ______________________________________________
    >>
    >> CRT Degradation
    >> CRT Aging - Effects on Electrical Characteristics and Performance
    >> (From: Jeroen H. Stessen ().)
    >> Specifications for Philips CRTs can be found in the regular series of data
    >> books from Philips Components. Companies and universities usually have them.
    >> Usually the data sheets show typical Ik/Vk characteristics. They also list
    >> the spread on cutoff voltage and cathode gain, and this spread is quite
    >> large even on new CRTs. They also list phosphor sensitivity (Lum/Ik), this
    >> too has a large spread. But they almost never list anything about the aging
    >> process.
    >>
    >> Here are some of the effects:
    >>
    >> a.. Phosphor ages due to burn-in, particularly on static pictures, this is
    >> immediately obvious on visual inspection. If the aging is even (no pattern)
    >> then at least the efficiency is reduced.
    >> b.. Cathodes age due to loss of emission material, particularly for oxide
    >> cathodes. The central part of the cathode surface has carried the most
    >> current density and will wear out first. The surrounding area takes over,
    >> this will lead to an unsharp picture. Adjusting the focus voltage will not
    >> really improve it. The tube is worn out.
    >> c.. Also poisoning of cathode surface may occur. This can be cured
    >> temporarily by short-time overheating ("re-conditioning").
    >> d.. The cathode that wears out first (often the red one) also loses gain,
    >> so the white point of the image will shift (to cyan). The white point can be
    >> re-adjusted with the gain potentiometers and the contrast, but peak
    >> brightness will not be as high as new.
    >> e.. The cutoff voltages of all cathodes will drift. Common drift is
    >> adjusted by the user by controlling the brightness. Different drift leads to
    >> a coloration of the black background level. In extreme cases vertical
    >> flyback lines will appear. Cutoff voltage can be adjusted with
    >> potentiometers, or there is automatic stabilisation. Still, the VG2 (screen)
    >> may need periodic adjustment too.
    >> f.. Leakage currents may disturb VG2 and focus voltage, re-adjustment has
    >> only a temporary effect.
    >> g.. VG2 and focus potentiometers may wear out due to electromigration etc.
    >> A hole may form under the wiper, re-adjustment is then impossible.
    >> h.. Some types of cathode wear (according to a friend in Philips
    >> Semiconductors) can cause the Ik/Vk transfer characteristic to divert so
    >> much from an ideal gamma function that no adjustment can compensate for it.
    >> Then the tube is really worn out.
    >> I hope that this helps you to distinguish between a really worn out tube and
    >> one that still has some life in it after re-adjustment.
    >>
    >>
    >> ____________________________________________
    >>
    >>
    >> It is best to engage your brain before operating your mouth!!!
    >>

    > As i said, "horsemanure".
    > In *all* cases where a color (or colors) flickered or went out, it
    >was due to an intermittent or open at the CRT socket in the back.
    > The solder is under constant stress due to a sponge on the back of
    >the monitor case pressing against the metal cage around the PCB that
    >connects to the CRT.
    > I unsolder the cage (3-5 places), untwist the unsoldered tabs, and
    >remove the cage.
    > Then i always remove the solder that is on all of the socket pins
    >(and there is lots of solder globbed on), and flow fresh solder on
    >making a bright hot solder connection in all places.
    > Next i put the cage back on and re-solder it; do not bother twisting
    >the tabs as that weakens them further - and i may need to repeat the
    >procedure 3-8 years down line.
    > I have repaired many monitors this way and used some for well over 10
    >years and sold some and others were repairs for other owners.



    I had, what sounds like, an identical problem.

    Consider opening up the box and check that your video card is firmly
    seated. I had been inside the thing a couple of days previous.
    Around 48 hours later, the 'red attack' occurred. Not the entire
    screen but the edge, such as windows frames, taskbar, etc., went red.
    I did all the usual stuff. Malware scans, various checks.
    There were other symptoms after the initial red attack but that's not
    relevant, at least, not at this stage.
    I should mention that although the card didn't feel as though it
    wasn't seated, it actually was just out of position enough to cause
    problems. I'd had the box open for a couple of reasons, and that was
    enough to... well, you get the idea.
    HTH
    Julia Set, Dec 26, 2005
    #9
  10. deiopajw

    JANA Guest

    I am under the impression that there was colour temperature drift, not an
    intermittent connection.

    --

    JANA
    _____


    "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    news:DhOrf.2618$...
    JANA wrote:
    > Colour temperature on a monitor can drift out of specs, if the CRT is
    > going
    > weak, or if there is a drive or bias problem in the circuits that feed the
    > CRT. The most common problem is that the CRT goes weak.
    >
    > For a well detailed writeup about CRT's used in TV and monitor equipment,
    > visit http://arcadecontrols.com/files/Miscellaneous/crtfaq.htm
    >
    > ______________________________________________
    >
    > CRT Degradation
    > CRT Aging - Effects on Electrical Characteristics and Performance
    > (From: Jeroen H. Stessen ().)
    > Specifications for Philips CRTs can be found in the regular series of data
    > books from Philips Components. Companies and universities usually have
    > them.
    > Usually the data sheets show typical Ik/Vk characteristics. They also list
    > the spread on cutoff voltage and cathode gain, and this spread is quite
    > large even on new CRTs. They also list phosphor sensitivity (Lum/Ik), this
    > too has a large spread. But they almost never list anything about the
    > aging
    > process.
    >
    > Here are some of the effects:
    >
    > a.. Phosphor ages due to burn-in, particularly on static pictures, this
    > is
    > immediately obvious on visual inspection. If the aging is even (no
    > pattern)
    > then at least the efficiency is reduced.
    > b.. Cathodes age due to loss of emission material, particularly for
    > oxide
    > cathodes. The central part of the cathode surface has carried the most
    > current density and will wear out first. The surrounding area takes over,
    > this will lead to an unsharp picture. Adjusting the focus voltage will not
    > really improve it. The tube is worn out.
    > c.. Also poisoning of cathode surface may occur. This can be cured
    > temporarily by short-time overheating ("re-conditioning").
    > d.. The cathode that wears out first (often the red one) also loses
    > gain,
    > so the white point of the image will shift (to cyan). The white point can
    > be
    > re-adjusted with the gain potentiometers and the contrast, but peak
    > brightness will not be as high as new.
    > e.. The cutoff voltages of all cathodes will drift. Common drift is
    > adjusted by the user by controlling the brightness. Different drift leads
    > to
    > a coloration of the black background level. In extreme cases vertical
    > flyback lines will appear. Cutoff voltage can be adjusted with
    > potentiometers, or there is automatic stabilisation. Still, the VG2
    > (screen)
    > may need periodic adjustment too.
    > f.. Leakage currents may disturb VG2 and focus voltage, re-adjustment
    > has
    > only a temporary effect.
    > g.. VG2 and focus potentiometers may wear out due to electromigration
    > etc.
    > A hole may form under the wiper, re-adjustment is then impossible.
    > h.. Some types of cathode wear (according to a friend in Philips
    > Semiconductors) can cause the Ik/Vk transfer characteristic to divert so
    > much from an ideal gamma function that no adjustment can compensate for
    > it.
    > Then the tube is really worn out.
    > I hope that this helps you to distinguish between a really worn out tube
    > and
    > one that still has some life in it after re-adjustment.
    >
    >
    > ____________________________________________
    >
    >
    > It is best to engage your brain before operating your mouth!!!
    >

    As i said, "horsemanure".
    In *all* cases where a color (or colors) flickered or went out, it
    was due to an intermittent or open at the CRT socket in the back.
    The solder is under constant stress due to a sponge on the back of
    the monitor case pressing against the metal cage around the PCB that
    connects to the CRT.
    I unsolder the cage (3-5 places), untwist the unsoldered tabs, and
    remove the cage.
    Then i always remove the solder that is on all of the socket pins
    (and there is lots of solder globbed on), and flow fresh solder on
    making a bright hot solder connection in all places.
    Next i put the cage back on and re-solder it; do not bother twisting
    the tabs as that weakens them further - and i may need to repeat the
    procedure 3-8 years down line.
    I have repaired many monitors this way and used some for well over 10
    years and sold some and others were repairs for other owners.
    JANA, Dec 26, 2005
    #10
  11. deiopajw

    Robert Baer Guest

    JANA wrote:

    > I am under the impression that there was colour temperature drift, not an
    > intermittent connection.
    >

    I have been in electronics for over 40 years and have never seen
    "color temperature drift" in a color monitor.
    In fact, i could say the same for TV sets, because color changes were
    not due to "color temperature drift".
    Robert Baer, Dec 28, 2005
    #11
  12. deiopajw

    Erick Guest

    If it were an LCD, it would be a bad backlight. I've never seen that problem
    in a CRT before.


    "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    news:WMrsf.3198$...
    JANA wrote:

    > I am under the impression that there was colour temperature drift, not an
    > intermittent connection.
    >

    I have been in electronics for over 40 years and have never seen
    "color temperature drift" in a color monitor.
    In fact, i could say the same for TV sets, because color changes were
    not due to "color temperature drift".
    Erick, Jan 3, 2006
    #12
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