Red in the face......

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Robert, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. Robert

    Robert Guest

    Hi everyone. I've been using a Panasonic fz20 for the past year. When I
    take flash shots of faces, I get red hues on all the high points....cheek
    bones, nose, forehead, etc. For the most of you, who are a lot more
    experienced than I, is this a technique problem or a flash problem? And, if
    you could shed some light on how to reduce my flushed faces, I would be
    very grateful. Also using Picasa2.

    Thanks,
    rm
     
    Robert, Dec 20, 2005
    #1
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  2. Robert

    guanaco Guest

    Don't use flash. And set mode at auto
     
    guanaco, Dec 20, 2005
    #2
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  3. Robert

    Paul Guest

    Try uploading the pic to www.tinypic.com and posting the link. That we can
    see the pic in question.


    "Robert" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi everyone. I've been using a Panasonic fz20 for the past year. When I
    > take flash shots of faces, I get red hues on all the high points....cheek
    > bones, nose, forehead, etc. For the most of you, who are a lot more
    > experienced than I, is this a technique problem or a flash problem? And,

    if
    > you could shed some light on how to reduce my flushed faces, I would be
    > very grateful. Also using Picasa2.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > rm
    >
    >
     
    Paul, Dec 20, 2005
    #3
  4. Robert

    Robert Guest

    Here is the URL to a typical flash picture denoting the flushed look on both
    faces. Thanks for taking the intrest in this problem and for the
    "tinypic.com' site.

    http://tinypic.com/iwrhgz.jpg

    Bob







    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Try uploading the pic to www.tinypic.com and posting the link. That we
    > can
    > see the pic in question.
    >
    >
    > "Robert" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi everyone. I've been using a Panasonic fz20 for the past year. When I
    >> take flash shots of faces, I get red hues on all the high points....cheek
    >> bones, nose, forehead, etc. For the most of you, who are a lot more
    >> experienced than I, is this a technique problem or a flash problem? And,

    > if
    >> you could shed some light on how to reduce my flushed faces, I would be
    >> very grateful. Also using Picasa2.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> rm
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Robert, Dec 20, 2005
    #4
  5. Robert

    Joe Petolino Guest

    Robert wrote:
    >>>Hi everyone. I've been using a Panasonic fz20 for the past year. When I
    >>>take flash shots of faces, I get red hues on all the high points....cheek
    >>>bones, nose, forehead, etc. For the most of you, who are a lot more
    >>>experienced than I, is this a technique problem or a flash problem?

    .. . .
    > Here is the URL to a typical flash picture denoting the flushed look on both
    > faces.

    .. . .
    > http://tinypic.com/iwrhgz.jpg


    It looks like a slight color balance problem (too magenta) - maybe the
    camera isn't using the right white point. I was able to make this fix
    using the white and gray eyedroppers in the Photoshop curves tool,
    plus a tiny bit of manual tweaking:

    http://tinypic.com/ixcgua.jpg

    The guy's cheeks are still a bit red. With a little work you could
    get it better.

    How are you looking at the picture - on a monitor, or in a print? Is
    your monitor calibrated? You may not be seeing the same colors as we are.

    -Joe
     
    Joe Petolino, Dec 21, 2005
    #5
  6. Robert

    Robert Guest

    I do not have photoshop so trying to solve the problem there is in the
    future. With regard to the monitor, I'm not seeing the redness in faces
    except when I use a flash. I thought there were some camera adjustments
    that could be applied to reduce this problem of maybe using a bounce flash
    of something of the like. At any rate, thank you both for your responses.
    I very much appreciate the feed back.

    Thanks again,
    Bob





    ________________________________________________________
    "Joe Petolino" <> wrote in message
    news:NE7qf.40560$...
    > Robert wrote:
    > >>>Hi everyone. I've been using a Panasonic fz20 for the past year. When
    > >>>I
    > >>>take flash shots of faces, I get red hues on all the high
    > >>>points....cheek
    > >>>bones, nose, forehead, etc. For the most of you, who are a lot more
    > >>>experienced than I, is this a technique problem or a flash problem?

    > . . .
    > > Here is the URL to a typical flash picture denoting the flushed look on
    > > both
    > > faces.

    > . . .
    > > http://tinypic.com/iwrhgz.jpg

    >
    > It looks like a slight color balance problem (too magenta) - maybe the
    > camera isn't using the right white point. I was able to make this fix
    > using the white and gray eyedroppers in the Photoshop curves tool,
    > plus a tiny bit of manual tweaking:
    >
    > http://tinypic.com/ixcgua.jpg
    >
    > The guy's cheeks are still a bit red. With a little work you could
    > get it better.
    >
    > How are you looking at the picture - on a monitor, or in a print? Is
    > your monitor calibrated? You may not be seeing the same colors as we are.
    >
    > -Joe
     
    Robert, Dec 22, 2005
    #6
  7. Robert <> wrote:
    : I do not have photoshop so trying to solve the problem there is in the
    : future. With regard to the monitor, I'm not seeing the redness in faces
    : except when I use a flash. I thought there were some camera adjustments
    : that could be applied to reduce this problem of maybe using a bounce flash
    : of something of the like. At any rate, thank you both for your responses.
    : I very much appreciate the feed back.

    One thought, it may be that your cameras white balance is set for
    florescent lighting (which has a bluish or greenish cast) and so a red
    "filter" is used to counteract this color. But the flash does not have
    that blue/green cast and so the red filter would give your image a slight
    redish cast. Check to see what WB setting you are using. Some cameras even
    have a "flash" WB setting that MAY fix this problem.

    Just "one more possibility" to explore.

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Dec 23, 2005
    #7
  8. Randy Berbaum wrote:
    > Robert <> wrote:
    > : I do not have photoshop so trying to solve the problem there is in the
    > : future. With regard to the monitor, I'm not seeing the redness in faces
    > : except when I use a flash. I thought there were some camera adjustments
    > : that could be applied to reduce this problem of maybe using a bounce flash
    > : of something of the like. At any rate, thank you both for your responses.
    > : I very much appreciate the feed back.
    >
    > One thought, it may be that your cameras white balance is set for
    > florescent lighting (which has a bluish or greenish cast) and so a red
    > "filter" is used to counteract this color. But the flash does not have
    > that blue/green cast and so the red filter would give your image a slight
    > redish cast. Check to see what WB setting you are using. Some cameras even
    > have a "flash" WB setting that MAY fix this problem.
    >
    > Just "one more possibility" to explore.


    Funny you should mention that Randy. I was taking a picture of a Lilo
    and Scrump sculpture last night and had accidentally left the WB
    manually set to incandescent. The picture ended up with an overall
    bluish cast. The OP's picture didn't seem to have the same problem, but
    I guess it is a possibility.

    --
    - Barry
     
    Barry L. Wallis, Dec 23, 2005
    #8
  9. Barry L. Wallis <> wrote:

    : Funny you should mention that Randy. I was taking a picture of a Lilo
    : and Scrump sculpture last night and had accidentally left the WB
    : manually set to incandescent. The picture ended up with an overall
    : bluish cast. The OP's picture didn't seem to have the same problem, but
    : I guess it is a possibility.

    Incandecent light is high in reds and so a blue filter is used to
    compensate. While florescent lights have more blue/green and so a red
    filter is used.

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Dec 24, 2005
    #9
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