Recording mpeg-4 on a dvd-r?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Mark, Sep 4, 2006.

  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Can someone help me with a question I have? I think there are dvd
    players that will play mpeg-4 (although I'm not positive). Now can you
    record mpeg-4 on a dvd-r and play it? I'm interested in knowing
    specifically about mpeg-4 H.264 which is the best quality.
    Mark, Sep 4, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Mark

    Bob Guest

    On Mon, 04 Sep 2006 16:54:27 GMT, Mark <> wrote:

    >I think there are dvd
    >players that will play mpeg-4 (although I'm not positive).


    Yes, many of the newest player/recorder units can play MPG4s in one
    form or the other. One of the more popular encodings is DivX/Xvid
    AVIs. My ILO DVDR05MU1/6.10 can play XviDs. But I am no longer
    recommending that unit because it appears Cyberhome who makes it may
    go out of business. Anyway, a year later the unit is getting old.

    All you can do is try it out at the store or buy a unit at WalMart so
    you can take it back. Or you can call or email tech support at the
    manufacturer to find out in advance.

    >Now can you record mpeg-4 on a dvd-r and play it?


    Auto Gordian Knot will convert DVD to AVI, which is the wrapper used
    for DivX and Xvid MPG-4 encodings.

    I find for medium resolution (19" viewscreen) that 1/2 CD size (350
    MB) works fine for 42 minutes TV episodes. That's about 720x480
    framesize, or close to it, and 1,000 kb/s bitrate. That's about 5
    times smaller in size than an MP2 encoding. You can get 12 of those
    files on a DVD, which is a half season of episodes. IOW, you can store
    an entire season of 42 min episodes at good resolution on just 2 DVDs.

    > I'm interested in knowing
    >specifically about mpeg-4 H.264 which is the best quality.


    Maltby is the acknowledged expert on that.

    --

    "There is no distinctly native American criminal class save Congress."
    --Mark Twain
    Bob, Sep 4, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Mark

    Bill's News Guest

    Mark wrote:
    > Can someone help me with a question I have? I think there are dvd
    > players that will play mpeg-4 (although I'm not positive). Now can
    > you
    > record mpeg-4 on a dvd-r and play it? I'm interested in knowing
    > specifically about mpeg-4 H.264 which is the best quality.


    Always a good place to check for desired player features:
    http://www.videohelp.com/dvdplayers
    one hit

    Googleing like this: "DVD Player" H264, produces some interesting
    results in that it seems that KISS has one in the works and that
    Broadcom may be bringing out an HDVDR.

    Otherwise, both searches produce a dearth of hardware players
    presently.
    Bill's News, Sep 4, 2006
    #3
  4. Mark

    Bob Guest

    On Mon, 4 Sep 2006 12:16:45 -0700, "Bill's News"
    <> wrote:

    >Always a good place to check for desired player features:
    >http://www.videohelp.com/dvdplayers


    Are there any decent affordable DVD recorders that have a hard disk,
    DivX and XviD compatable, two TV encoders so you can record two TV
    shows at the same time off of a regular antenna, time slip capability,
    and Ethernet so you can mount the HD on your LAN? No game boxes.


    --

    "There is no distinctly native American criminal class save Congress."
    --Mark Twain
    Bob, Sep 5, 2006
    #4
  5. Mark

    Bill's News Guest

    Bob wrote:
    > On Mon, 4 Sep 2006 12:16:45 -0700, "Bill's News"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Always a good place to check for desired player features:
    >> http://www.videohelp.com/dvdplayers

    >
    > Are there any decent affordable DVD recorders that have a hard disk,
    > DivX and XviD compatable, two TV encoders so you can record two TV
    > shows at the same time off of a regular antenna, time slip
    > capability,
    > and Ethernet so you can mount the HD on your LAN? No game boxes.


    Affordable for whom? The Hauppauge 500 PCI for MCE fits the bill at
    the low end of current prices. I've read that some other cards can be
    installed in multiples. There are quite a few stand alone devices
    listed at the site referenced, but dual tuner is not yet an option on
    the page, so I'll leave that for others to wade through. Rather than
    Ethernet, which is not bad per se, I prefer USB2 NTFS formatted hard
    drives to be supported. Hot-swapping these units places all of your
    recordings onto the PC with absolutely no overhead on either the PC or
    the recorder. I recently picked up a 600 gB LaCie USB2 for something
    like US$260. One drawback of this unit though is that it doesn't idle
    with disuse as some others do.

    Maybe the folks at videohelp will add the multi-tuner checkbox to the
    search in the future.
    Bill's News, Sep 5, 2006
    #5
  6. Mark

    Bob Guest

    On Tue, 5 Sep 2006 08:59:45 -0700, "Bill's News"
    <> wrote:

    >Affordable for whom? The Hauppauge 500 PCI for MCE fits the bill at
    >the low end of current prices. I've read that some other cards can be
    >installed in multiples.


    I am looking for a DVDR. I would rather not have to build my own PVR
    at this time, certainly not with Windows. I have been using NT (NT4
    and NT5, aka Win2K) for 10 years now and I am still chasing down bugs.

    > There are quite a few stand alone devices
    >listed at the site referenced, but dual tuner is not yet an option on
    >the page, so I'll leave that for others to wade through.


    I did some wading and did not see any. I was hoping you had another
    site in mind.

    > Rather than
    >Ethernet, which is not bad per se, I prefer USB2 NTFS formatted hard
    >drives to be supported. Hot-swapping these units places all of your
    >recordings onto the PC with absolutely no overhead on either the PC or
    >the recorder. I recently picked up a 600 gB LaCie USB2 for something
    >like US$260. One drawback of this unit though is that it doesn't idle
    >with disuse as some others do.


    Ethernet is so much better in a setting where there are multiple
    computers. Imagine the classic family of 4 with 4 different sets of
    tastes in entertainment. Fill the hard drive with all sorts of content
    and let each person view it on their own computer in their own room.

    But I do like the idea of USB memory. I will include that on my
    wishlist.

    >Maybe the folks at videohelp will add the multi-tuner checkbox to the
    >search in the future.


    First they need to add one for hard drives.


    --

    "There is no distinctly native American criminal class save Congress."
    --Mark Twain
    Bob, Sep 5, 2006
    #6
  7. Mark

    Bill's News Guest

    Bob wrote:
    > On Tue, 5 Sep 2006 08:59:45 -0700, "Bill's News"

    <snip>
    > First they need to add one for hard drives.


    http://www.videohelp.com/dvdrecorders
    For DVD recorders, look in the "Features" section, check "Built in
    HardDrive ..."
    Bill's News, Sep 6, 2006
    #7
  8. Mark

    Bill's News Guest

    Bob wrote:
    > On Tue, 5 Sep 2006 08:59:45 -0700, "Bill's News"

    <snip

    >> Rather than
    >> Ethernet, which is not bad per se, I prefer USB2 NTFS formatted
    >> hard
    >> drives to be supported. Hot-swapping these units places all of
    >> your
    >> recordings onto the PC with absolutely no overhead on either the PC
    >> or the recorder. I recently picked up a 600 gB LaCie USB2 for
    >> something like US$260. One drawback of this unit though is that it
    >> doesn't idle with disuse as some others do.

    >
    > Ethernet is so much better in a setting where there are multiple
    > computers. Imagine the classic family of 4 with 4 different sets of
    > tastes in entertainment. Fill the hard drive with all sorts of
    > content
    > and let each person view it on their own computer in their own room.
    >

    <snip>

    Aside from the erosion of the nuclear (or new-klew-yar?) family, the
    problem with the Ethernet connection to a stand-alone recorder is that
    you will not likely have 4 family members each viewing a recording of
    their own choice from the player on 4 different PCs while the player
    is also recording 2 or more channels and possibly playing a DVD for a
    local TV viewer having no PC. This is why I feel that a NIC for the
    stand-alone is underkill. The family with multiple PCs is already
    networked; the transfer of the entire content of the USB drive to
    their network takes but seconds to accomplish. A fresh, empty, USB
    drive is plugged into the recorder in its place. The size of this
    hard drive then becomes whimsical on the part of the user. In this
    case, the stand-alone player's internal hard-drive would be quite
    generous at 80 gB or so, merely enough to hold the OS, the guide, the
    users' program selections, and a generous timeshift buffer - and it
    would not need to be scalable by source video definition.

    This of course will never happen while there is an MPAA ;-0) And I
    doubt that TiVo's quite hackable USB transfer will ever fly with the
    series 3, if they're expecting cable companies to provide cable-cards.
    The copyright holders of HiDef and DVD source materials have every
    right to expect that hole to be plugged - while still allowing support
    of lower resolution (upto 480p) transfers in the spirit of long past
    court decisions.
    Bill's News, Sep 6, 2006
    #8
  9. Mark

    Bob Guest

    On Wed, 6 Sep 2006 06:59:07 -0700, "Bill's News"
    <> wrote:

    >> First they need to add one for hard drives.


    >http://www.videohelp.com/dvdrecorders
    >For DVD recorders, look in the "Features" section, check "Built in
    >HardDrive ..."


    Thanks.

    --

    "There is no distinctly native American criminal class save Congress."
    --Mark Twain
    Bob, Sep 7, 2006
    #9
  10. Mark

    Bob Guest

    On Wed, 6 Sep 2006 07:58:45 -0700, "Bill's News"
    <> wrote:

    >Aside from the erosion of the nuclear (or new-klew-yar?) family, the
    >problem with the Ethernet connection to a stand-alone recorder is that
    >you will not likely have 4 family members each viewing a recording of
    >their own choice from the player on 4 different PCs while the player
    >is also recording 2 or more channels and possibly playing a DVD for a
    >local TV viewer having no PC. This is why I feel that a NIC for the
    >stand-alone is underkill. The family with multiple PCs is already
    >networked; the transfer of the entire content of the USB drive to
    >their network takes but seconds to accomplish. A fresh, empty, USB
    >drive is plugged into the recorder in its place. The size of this
    >hard drive then becomes whimsical on the part of the user. In this
    >case, the stand-alone player's internal hard-drive would be quite
    >generous at 80 gB or so, merely enough to hold the OS, the guide, the
    >users' program selections, and a generous timeshift buffer - and it
    >would not need to be scalable by source video definition.


    You make a good case for using USB flash memory and doing away with
    the network connection. However it does entail extra operations, which
    I suppose can be overlooked if the interface is super friendly.

    Plug in memory, point and click, download, remove memory. If it's that
    easy, then I am sold. Screw Ethernet.


    --

    "There is no distinctly native American criminal class save Congress."
    --Mark Twain
    Bob, Sep 7, 2006
    #10
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.

Share This Page