Recording HD

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Phisherman, Mar 5, 2008.

  1. Phisherman

    Phisherman Guest

    I have a PC with a tuner card that can record high-definition
    programs. I can watch these programs on my PC. I can convert these
    programs, burn a DVD and play the DVD in my theater room. The
    conversion takes about an hour for an hour show. Here is where a
    Blu-ray burner would be useful. Is there an easier way to record an
    HD program without buying a DVR for the theater room? My PC and
    theater room are not in close proximity. I can use my old VCR which
    still works great, but it is not high definition (are there
    inexpensive VCRs that record high definition?) Got to keep under $500
    on any solution. TIA
    Phisherman, Mar 5, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Phisherman

    Telstar Guest

    "Phisherman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have a PC with a tuner card that can record high-definition
    > programs. I can watch these programs on my PC. I can convert these
    > programs, burn a DVD and play the DVD in my theater room. The
    > conversion takes about an hour for an hour show. Here is where a
    > Blu-ray burner would be useful. Is there an easier way to record an
    > HD program without buying a DVR for the theater room? My PC and
    > theater room are not in close proximity. I can use my old VCR which
    > still works great, but it is not high definition (are there
    > inexpensive VCRs that record high definition?) Got to keep under $500
    > on any solution. TIA


    No.
    Telstar, Mar 5, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Phisherman

    Doug Jacobs Guest

    Phisherman <> wrote:
    > I have a PC with a tuner card that can record high-definition
    > programs. I can watch these programs on my PC. I can convert these
    > programs, burn a DVD and play the DVD in my theater room. The
    > conversion takes about an hour for an hour show. Here is where a
    > Blu-ray burner would be useful. Is there an easier way to record an
    > HD program without buying a DVR for the theater room? My PC and
    > theater room are not in close proximity. I can use my old VCR which
    > still works great, but it is not high definition (are there
    > inexpensive VCRs that record high definition?) Got to keep under $500
    > on any solution. TIA


    VCRs aren't HD. Period.

    Blu-ray burners for the PC are about $400-600, but blank Blu-Ray discs are
    still about $20 a piece.

    Burners are also quite slow, so it will take you longer to burn the show
    to a BD-R than to a DVD-R.

    You might want to consider getting a small PC with a large hard drive for
    the theater room, and hook that up to your TV. You could then use
    wireless to copy the program(s) to this PC, or dump them onto a thumb
    drive or external hard drive, and carry that to the theater. (aka "Sneaker
    net") I wouldn't try streaming the show via WiFi - just not enough
    bandwidth.

    --
    It's not broken. It's...advanced.
    Doug Jacobs, Mar 6, 2008
    #3
  4. Phisherman

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, Doug Jacobs <> wrote:
    >Phisherman <> wrote:
    >> I have a PC with a tuner card that can record high-definition
    >> programs. I can watch these programs on my PC. I can convert these
    >> programs, burn a DVD and play the DVD in my theater room. The
    >> conversion takes about an hour for an hour show. Here is where a
    >> Blu-ray burner would be useful. Is there an easier way to record an
    >> HD program without buying a DVR for the theater room? My PC and
    >> theater room are not in close proximity. I can use my old VCR which
    >> still works great, but it is not high definition (are there
    >> inexpensive VCRs that record high definition?) Got to keep under $500
    >> on any solution. TIA

    >
    >VCRs aren't HD. Period.


    A few JVC and Mitsubishi D-VHS models were.



    >Blu-ray burners for the PC are about $400-600, but blank Blu-Ray discs are
    >still about $20 a piece.
    >
    >Burners are also quite slow, so it will take you longer to burn the show
    >to a BD-R than to a DVD-R.


    >
    >You might want to consider getting a small PC with a large hard drive for
    >the theater room, and hook that up to your TV. You could then use
    >wireless to copy the program(s) to this PC, or dump them onto a thumb
    >drive or external hard drive, and carry that to the theater. (aka "Sneaker
    >net") I wouldn't try streaming the show via WiFi - just not enough
    >bandwidth.
    >
    GMAN, Mar 6, 2008
    #4
  5. Phisherman

    Richard C. Guest

    Richard C., Mar 6, 2008
    #5
  6. Phisherman

    Bill's News Guest

    Phisherman <> wrote in
    news::

    > I have a PC with a tuner card that can record high-definition
    > programs. I can watch these programs on my PC. I can convert
    > these programs, burn a DVD and play the DVD in my theater
    > room. The conversion takes about an hour for an hour show.
    > Here is where a Blu-ray burner would be useful. Is there an
    > easier way to record an HD program without buying a DVR for
    > the theater room? My PC and theater room are not in close
    > proximity. I can use my old VCR which still works great, but
    > it is not high definition (are there inexpensive VCRs that
    > record high definition?) Got to keep under $500 on any
    > solution. TIA


    Without even shopping around, for about $470 (including upgraded
    CPU and video card) one can buy a DELL inspiron slim PC. Also
    check out geeks.com for refurbs, but it's harder to determine
    quietness for these and the price per pound is not that much
    better than DELL's.

    I'm using DELL Dimension C521s, which were about $500 each a year
    or two ago. If your video capture card is low-profile, you could
    install it in one of these slim PCs, but you can also simply
    write MPEGISO files to DVD from your capture PC and play directly
    in any PC with enough horsepower to play HDTV, which isn't very
    demanding. About 42 minutes of HDTV fits on a DVD5 - almost as
    if there was some thought put into bit rates for HDTV, eh? This
    means you'd spend maybe 5 minutes editing captures, 5 to 10
    writing the edited version, and, if necessary, maybe 8 to 15
    minutes burning to reusable media.

    The DELL Dimension C521 (with AMD 3800 dual-core 2 ghz CPU) is
    completely silent, even while simultaneously capturing and
    playing HDTV, or playing Blu-Ray discs. I'm assuming that the
    newer DELL slims will be equally quiet.

    Be sure to select the customize path which enables you to choose
    WinXP.
    Bill's News, Mar 6, 2008
    #6
  7. Phisherman

    Tarkus Guest

    Doug Jacobs wrote:
    I wouldn't try streaming the show via WiFi - just not enough
    > bandwidth.


    Even the new N standard (serious question)? Seems like if you could
    buffer a certain amount, it would be doable.
    Tarkus, Mar 7, 2008
    #7
  8. Phisherman

    Doug Jacobs Guest

    Tarkus <> wrote:
    > Even the new N standard (serious question)? Seems like if you could
    > buffer a certain amount, it would be doable.


    If you've buffered enough, then it won't be a problem even at slower
    speeds. However, who wants to wait several minutes before being able to
    start watching the movie?

    A HD signal is going to need roughly 120-150Mbps, which puts it into the
    gigabit ethernet range if you're talking streaming. I guess if you had a
    really strong, stable 802.11N signal, you might be able to do it, but you'd
    pretty much saturate the connection - and even then we're talking about the
    theorhetical maximum here which assumes a pristine signal, no walls or
    interference, etc.

    Current "HD downloads", like the ones offered for AppleTV, the Xbox 360 or
    Playstation3 use a highly compressed codec so that movies are a more
    reasonable 4-6GB instead of >20GB you find on blu-ray discs. These will
    obviously require less bandwidth to stream, but at the same time, aren't
    quite the same quality of a blu-ray disc either.

    --
    It's not broken. It's...advanced.
    Doug Jacobs, Mar 10, 2008
    #8
  9. Phisherman

    Guest

    On Mar 6, 3:40 pm, Doug Jacobs <> wrote:
    > Phisherman <> wrote:
    > > I have a PC with a tuner card that can record high-definition
    > > programs.  I can watch these programs on my PC.  I can convert these
    > > programs, burn a DVD and play the DVD in my theater room.  The
    > > conversion takes about an hour for an hour show.   Here is where a
    > > Blu-ray burner would be useful.  Is there an easier way to record an
    > > HD program without buying a DVR for the theater room?  My PC and
    > > theater room are not in close proximity.  I can use my old VCR which
    > > still works great, but it is not high definition (are there
    > > inexpensive VCRs that record high definition?)  Got to keep under $500
    > > on any solution.  TIA

    >
    > VCRs aren't HD.  Period.  
    >
    > Blu-ray burners for the PC are about $400-600, but blank Blu-Ray discs are
    > still about $20 a piece.
    >
    > Burners are also quite slow, so it will take you longer to burn the show
    > to a BD-R than to a DVD-R.
    >
    > You might want to  consider getting a small PC with a large hard drive for
    > the theater room, and hook that up to your TV.  You could then use
    > wireless to copy the program(s) to this PC, or dump them onto a thumb
    > drive or external hard drive, and carry that to the theater.  (aka "Sneaker
    > net")  I wouldn't try streaming the show via WiFi - just not enough
    > bandwidth.
    >
    > --
    > It's not broken.  It's...advanced.


    I use two wified pcs to stream HD-quality video to a wified xbox 360
    and have no problems with bandwidth. The only time I experienced
    playback problems was when I tried the beta media server programs
    tversity and winamp remote but quickly went back to using wmp11's
    media sharing functionality. I'm also in the process of buiilding my
    own Media Center PC to expand on this HD-quality delivery method.
    , Mar 10, 2008
    #9
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. hakim soso

    Commands recording

    hakim soso, Oct 12, 2004, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    417
  2. John Daragon

    Recording Call Manager Configuration

    John Daragon, Aug 19, 2005, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    867
    John Daragon
    Aug 19, 2005
  3. °Mike°

    Re: Sound recording suggestions

    °Mike°, Jul 6, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    466
    °Mike°
    Jul 6, 2003
  4. Bones
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    654
    slumpy
    Jul 7, 2003
  5. Bill Dobbs

    Audio recording

    Bill Dobbs, Jul 18, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    569
    paul s
    Jul 18, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page