Recording closed captions off TV

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Ian Boag, Mar 1, 2006.

  1. Ian Boag

    Ian Boag Guest

    I'm back. I've researched the topic and made slow progress. I still
    need help.

    Closed captions come as a Teletext page. Inside the TV there are
    smarts that extract the info from the "off-pic" scan line where it is
    stored and mix it into the screen picture. That mixed picture is what
    I want to record.

    This can be achieved if one can find an old set-top box Teletext
    decoder. feed input from Sky box (or VCR or any tuner) to the TT
    decoder then take TTD output to video in on TV and bingo. Caps are
    mixed into the pic BEFORE it gets to the TV. Apparently it works just
    fine.

    These NEC boxes went out of production about 12 years ago when the
    FCC mandated that every TV sold in the US should have captions built
    in so the market died. There's no equivalent now AFAIK.

    I have tried the "video out" and "monitor" outputs on a number of TVs
    (testing the patience of several shop folk doing so) - in all cases I
    tried, the "video out" signal is just a copy of "video in" eg if one
    pulls up an on-screen menu on the "master" TV it doesn't appear on the
    "slave".

    Currently my thoughts are that maybe I need a computer TV tuner card
    that supports Teletext, then run the VGA output from that through a
    VGA->TV converter and record the result. Ugh. Converting from TV to
    VGA and back isn't likely to be pretty.

    Does anyone have any better ideas? My interest in this was for ESOL
    teaching, but as I dig further into it I discover that the inability
    to easily record captions is a big frustration for the deaf as well.
    Captions were done for them in the first place anyway.

    Ian Boag
    Ian Boag, Mar 1, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Ian Boag

    Shane Guest

    Ian Boag wrote:

    > I'm back. I've researched the topic and made slow progress. I still
    > need help.
    >
    > Closed captions come as a Teletext page. Inside the TV there are
    > smarts that extract the info from the "off-pic" scan line where it is
    > stored and mix it into the screen picture. That mixed picture is what
    > I want to record.
    >
    > This can be achieved if one can find an old set-top box Teletext
    > decoder. feed input from Sky box (or VCR or any tuner) to the TT
    > decoder then take TTD output to video in on TV and bingo. Caps are
    > mixed into the pic BEFORE it gets to the TV. Apparently it works just
    > fine.
    >
    > These NEC boxes went out of production about 12 years ago when the
    > FCC mandated that every TV sold in the US should have captions built
    > in so the market died. There's no equivalent now AFAIK.
    >
    > I have tried the "video out" and "monitor" outputs on a number of TVs
    > (testing the patience of several shop folk doing so) - in all cases I
    > tried, the "video out" signal is just a copy of "video in" eg if one
    > pulls up an on-screen menu on the "master" TV it doesn't appear on the
    > "slave".
    >
    > Currently my thoughts are that maybe I need a computer TV tuner card
    > that supports Teletext, then run the VGA output from that through a
    > VGA->TV converter and record the result. Ugh. Converting from TV to
    > VGA and back isn't likely to be pretty.
    >
    > Does anyone have any better ideas? My interest in this was for ESOL
    > teaching, but as I dig further into it I discover that the inability
    > to easily record captions is a big frustration for the deaf as well.
    > Captions were done for them in the first place anyway.
    >
    > Ian Boag


    Hi Ian, Im not sure if what I post (ever) is going to be any help
    whatsoever.... but......
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/6/story.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=10333579
    The Pinnacle PCTV is one of the better TV tuner bundles on the market. But
    you still need to take the cover off and delve into the guts of your PC,
    something that requires care if not great technical knowledge. The card
    fits into a PCI Bus slot in your computer and, once detected by Pinnacle's
    software, is ready to use.
    An application called Webtext is bundled, but it didn't work for me. Who
    uses Teletext now anyway?

    I had a look round for Webtext (theres some stripper screensavers associated
    with that name, which I will save for later.. :)
    But
    According to this
    http://www.mediaweb.connectfree.co.uk/PCTV_Review.html
    Webtext:

    From the manual the web text application seems to be a way of displaying
    teletext information as a web page. However when I tried to run the Webtext
    application to see what it is like but it failed to attach to its own local
    web server. However this problem may be due to the fact I have no TV
    antenna attached. The web server caused it own problems. With the web
    server running my mail client (Eudora Pro) would not get past its splash
    screen.

    And this
    http://dazzle.de/aboutus/PR/News.asp?NewsID=760&Langue_ID=2&Archive=1
    Pinnacle Systems has announced a major initiative to link the widespread
    European Teletext TV resource with the Internet. Pinnacle Systems
    introduces its free ?PCTV WebText? service at CeBIT 2000 in Hannover,
    Germany, enabling consumers to use their Internet browsers to view Teletext
    pages and then link to the World Wide Web for more in depth information on
    specific topic of interest.


    ____
    IS linux an option?
    http://www.goron.de/~froese/
    AleVT is a teletext/videotext decoder and browser for the
    bttv driver (/dev/vbi) and X11. It features multiple windows,
    a page cache, regexp searching, built-in manual, and more.
    There's also a program to get the time from teletext and
    one to capture teletext pages from scripts.

    http://www.goron.de/~froese/alevt/alevt-cap.html
    (Man Page)
    DESCRIPTION

    alevt-cap is a simple program to capture teletext pages
    and write them to disk. You just give it a list of pages
    to fetch and it will save them. Nothing fancy like time-
    outs, page ranges, or channel name detection is supported.
    Though, it supports different file formats - at the moment
    ascii, ansi (ascii with color escape sequences), html,
    png, and ppm.



    NOTE

    Before starting this program, you have to set the TV chanĀ­
    nel with another program like xawtv of set-tv.



    .....
    Etc etc etc..
    let me know if this is any help, and worth further consideration, as it has
    piqued my curiousity :)
    Shane, Mar 2, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Ian Boag

    Dave Taylor Guest

    (Ian Boag) wrote in news:440606c5.3147709
    @news.inspire.net.nz:

    > Does anyone have any better ideas? My interest in this was for ESOL
    > teaching, but as I dig further into it I discover that the inability
    > to easily record captions is a big frustration for the deaf as well.
    > Captions were done for them in the first place anyway.


    When I worked for a cable company in Canada, we HAD to have some boxes on
    hand for people if they were deaf and wanted them. It was the law.
    Contact your local deaf group and see if they have some contacts.

    --
    Ciao, Dave
    Dave Taylor, Mar 2, 2006
    #3
  4. Ian Boag

    Craig Sutton Guest

    "Ian Boag" <> wrote in message
    >
    > Does anyone have any better ideas? My interest in this was for ESOL
    > teaching, but as I dig further into it I discover that the inability
    > to easily record captions is a big frustration for the deaf as well.
    > Captions were done for them in the first place anyway.
    >

    any SVHS has the bandwidth to record the captions as well. There was another
    video format similar EVHS??? or something that recorded at a higher quality
    on normal tapes. You could probably locate one at Cash Converters.

    But i think the best option is to get a satellite tuner card and use that.
    Craig Sutton, Mar 2, 2006
    #4
  5. Ian Boag

    Nho Whei Guest

    On Thu, 2 Mar 2006 18:12:32 +1300, "Craig Sutton"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Ian Boag" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> Does anyone have any better ideas? My interest in this was for ESOL
    >> teaching, but as I dig further into it I discover that the inability
    >> to easily record captions is a big frustration for the deaf as well.
    >> Captions were done for them in the first place anyway.

    I would call the broadcasters themselves, even seek out the team that
    do the captioning, and see if they have any recommendations. Could
    also try the NZ Association for the Hearing Impaired (or whatever).
    It is doable though. Again years ago I knew someone who solved this
    with the help of the Mitsubishi? teletext decoder DSE used to sell.
    Saw one of these in Cash Convertors - years ago though.
    Good luck

    >>

    >any SVHS has the bandwidth to record the captions as well. There was another
    >video format similar EVHS??? or something that recorded at a higher quality
    >on normal tapes. You could probably locate one at Cash Converters.
    >
    >But i think the best option is to get a satellite tuner card and use that.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Nho Whei, Mar 2, 2006
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. DJ
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    642
    Joshua Zyber
    Mar 2, 2004
  2. Paul Rubin
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    3,243
    Paul Rubin
    Apr 24, 2004
  3. Closed Captions

    , Jun 20, 2004, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    24
    Views:
    1,688
  4. BobT

    Closed captions on HDTV

    BobT, Dec 25, 2004, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,348
    Impmon
    Jan 4, 2005
  5. RL
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    783
Loading...

Share This Page