Recommended External Flash for Kodak P850

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by domtam@hotmail.com, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Hi there. I've just bought my Kodak P850. One of the main reasons of
    picking P850 is that it supports external flash. I understand that
    Kodak P20 is one good option, but it's a bit too expensive. So, I'm
    looking for a non-dedicated 3rd party flash like Vivitar or Sunpak.

    According to Kodak support site, P850 (or DX6490), the maxmum voltage
    is 500 volts.
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/serv...jhtml?pq-path=7563/6917&locsvcsEntryPath=7562


    Could any of the P850 owners recommend a good (and safe) external flash
    for this camera? It'd be nice if it is around CAD$100, or US$80 or so.
    I hope that its guide number is over 30.

    Thanks a lot!
    Dominic
     
    , Nov 15, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Ron Baird Guest

    wrote:

    >Hi there. I've just bought my Kodak P850. One of the main reasons of
    >picking P850 is that it supports external flash. I understand that
    >Kodak P20 is one good option, but it's a bit too expensive. So, I'm
    >looking for a non-dedicated 3rd party flash like Vivitar or Sunpak.
    >
    >According to Kodak support site, P850 (or DX6490), the maxmum voltage
    >is 500 volts.
    >http://www.kodak.com/global/en/serv...jhtml?pq-path=7563/6917&locsvcsEntryPath=7562
    >
    >
    >Could any of the P850 owners recommend a good (and safe) external flash
    >for this camera? It'd be nice if it is around CAD$100, or US$80 or so.
    >I hope that its guide number is over 30.
    >
    >Thanks a lot!
    >Dominic
    >
    >
    >

    Greetings Dom,

    Actually, you are right, the camera will work with any flash that can
    connect using a standard flash connector. As noted it works up to 500 volts.

    One of the advantages of this camera, however, is the ability of the camera
    to talk to the flash and vice versa. This is worth the extra money as the
    camera and flash will work together to get the picture they way you want it.
    Other flashes will work also, but you will have to control the light via the
    flash then set the shutter and aperture etc. to accommodate the flash or
    vice versa. Check the review for details.

    I have and use a Sunpak 622 that will do lots of things, but you have to
    coordinate with the settings of the camera. The 622 is a quite a bit
    more powerful than the P20. So, for me it is a trade off between the
    extra power and the convenience of the auto/communication feature. I
    tend to like the auto option.

    The camera features: a bounce head that allows images to have a more natural
    light affect; the automated zoom gives greater flash coverage; the
    intelligent flash system can read camera setting information through the hot
    shoe and react accordingly.

    a.. Recycle time on fully charged batteries is approximately 10 seconds
    a.. At ISO 100 speed, the flash reaches a distance of 30 ft (9.1 m) at wide
    and 33 ft (10 m) at telephoto. At ISO to 200, flash ranges can be doubled
    a.. Bounce head for more natural light
    a.. Automated zoom for great flash coverage
    a.. Intelligent flash interacts with camera
    a.. Guide number: 40 at 80 mm position (ISO 100, m)
    a.. View settings on LCD display

    Talk to you soon,

    Ron Baird
    Eastman Kodak Company
     
    Ron Baird, Nov 17, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Ron Baird Guest

    wrote:

    >Hi there. I've just bought my Kodak P850. One of the main reasons of
    >picking P850 is that it supports external flash. I understand that
    >Kodak P20 is one good option, but it's a bit too expensive. So, I'm
    >looking for a non-dedicated 3rd party flash like Vivitar or Sunpak.
    >
    >According to Kodak support site, P850 (or DX6490), the maxmum voltage
    >is 500 volts.
    >http://www.kodak.com/global/en/serv...jhtml?pq-path=7563/6917&locsvcsEntryPath=7562
    >
    >
    >Could any of the P850 owners recommend a good (and safe) external flash
    >for this camera? It'd be nice if it is around CAD$100, or US$80 or so.
    >I hope that its guide number is over 30.
    >
    >Thanks a lot!
    >Dominic
    >
    >
    >

    Greetings Dom,

    Actually, you are right, the camera will work with any flash that can
    connect using a standard flash connector. As noted it works up to 500 volts.

    One of the advantages of this camera, however, is the ability of the camera
    to talk to the flash and vice versa. This is worth the extra money as the
    camera and flash will work together to get the picture they way you want it.
    Other flashes will work also, but you will have to control the light via the
    flash then set the shutter and aperture etc. to accommodate the flash or
    vice versa. Check the review for details.

    I have and use a Sunpak 622 that will do lots of things, but you have to
    coordinate with the settings of the camera. The 622 is a quite a bit
    more powerful than the P20. So, for me it is a trade off between the
    extra power and the convenience of the auto/communication feature. I
    tend to like the auto option.

    The camera features: a bounce head that allows images to have a more natural
    light affect; the automated zoom gives greater flash coverage; the
    intelligent flash system can read camera setting information through the hot
    shoe and react accordingly.

    a.. Recycle time on fully charged batteries is approximately 10 seconds
    a.. At ISO 100 speed, the flash reaches a distance of 30 ft (9.1 m) at wide
    and 33 ft (10 m) at telephoto. At ISO to 200, flash ranges can be doubled
    a.. Bounce head for more natural light
    a.. Automated zoom for great flash coverage
    a.. Intelligent flash interacts with camera
    a.. Guide number: 40 at 80 mm position (ISO 100, m)
    a.. View settings on LCD display

    Talk to you soon,

    Ron Baird
    Eastman Kodak Company
     
    Ron Baird, Nov 17, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    Thanks Ron, for your time to reply. I have a few more questions

    - Do you know if P20 head can swivel (good for bounced back flash of
    portrait photo)?

    - For my brief use of my P850, it does have problem with indoor
    (relatively low-light) auto-focussing. Is it due to the missing AF
    illuminator? Do you know if P20 has such a AF illuminator that can
    improve the low-light focussing of my P850. Otherwise, how can I
    achieve better result with indoor (or low-light condition) photos?

    - I do like a dedicated TTL flash too. It's very handy. Don't get me
    wrong. In fact, I also own a Canon dedicated flash 380EX for my old
    Canon Rebel G (BTW, a disappointing 35 mm camera). A problem with
    dedicated flash is that it cannot be transferred to any camera of
    another brand. For example, my Canon Flash cannot be used with my new
    Kodak P850 now. That's certainly another consideration.

    Do you think that your Sunpak 622 can work SAFELY with P850? How about
    Sunpak 383?


    Thanks a lot again, Ron!
    Dom
     
    , Nov 18, 2005
    #4
  5. Ron Baird Guest

    Hi Dom,

    Again, my apologies for being late in responding.

    Actually, the P850 that works well in providing flash synch via the hot
    shoe. I should have noted that this model does not have an external port for
    standard synch cords, however, so if you want to use a non shoe type flash,
    you need an accessory adapter to fit onto the shoe. I find the P20 does a
    really nice job. Experiment with it a bit before taking any serious
    pictures, the same as you would any other accessory.

    Your concern about the camera not focusing in low light is not a known issue
    with that camera. The camera has a 25 zone TTL metering system and can do
    multi-pattern, center-weighted, center spot, selectable zone metering modes.
    If you are not getting what you want during metering, try adjusting the
    camera to a zone better suited for low light, i.e. multi-pattern. See what
    happens. You can also use the over and under options to increase and or
    decrease exposure based on results.

    Also, the flash does not have a swivel head just the up and down option. It
    should accommodate the Sunpak 383 and other hot shoe mounted flashes.

    Sorry to be late, I will be around more now that I have returned.

    Talk to you soon,

    Ron Baird
    Eastman Kodak Company


    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks Ron, for your time to reply. I have a few more questions
    >
    > - Do you know if P20 head can swivel (good for bounced back flash of
    > portrait photo)?
    >
    > - For my brief use of my P850, it does have problem with indoor
    > (relatively low-light) auto-focussing. Is it due to the missing AF
    > illuminator? Do you know if P20 has such a AF illuminator that can
    > improve the low-light focussing of my P850. Otherwise, how can I
    > achieve better result with indoor (or low-light condition) photos?
    >
    > - I do like a dedicated TTL flash too. It's very handy. Don't get me
    > wrong. In fact, I also own a Canon dedicated flash 380EX for my old
    > Canon Rebel G (BTW, a disappointing 35 mm camera). A problem with
    > dedicated flash is that it cannot be transferred to any camera of
    > another brand. For example, my Canon Flash cannot be used with my new
    > Kodak P850 now. That's certainly another consideration.
    >
    > Do you think that your Sunpak 622 can work SAFELY with P850? How about
    > Sunpak 383?
    >
    >
    > Thanks a lot again, Ron!
    > Dom
    >
     
    Ron Baird, Dec 7, 2005
    #5
  6. Ron Baird Guest

    wrote:

    >Thanks Ron, for your time to reply. I have a few more questions
    >
    >- Do you know if P20 head can swivel (good for bounced back flash of
    >portrait photo)?
    >
    >- For my brief use of my P850, it does have problem with indoor
    >(relatively low-light) auto-focussing. Is it due to the missing AF
    >illuminator? Do you know if P20 has such a AF illuminator that can
    >improve the low-light focussing of my P850. Otherwise, how can I
    >achieve better result with indoor (or low-light condition) photos?
    >
    >- I do like a dedicated TTL flash too. It's very handy. Don't get me
    >wrong. In fact, I also own a Canon dedicated flash 380EX for my old
    >Canon Rebel G (BTW, a disappointing 35 mm camera). A problem with
    >dedicated flash is that it cannot be transferred to any camera of
    >another brand. For example, my Canon Flash cannot be used with my new
    >Kodak P850 now. That's certainly another consideration.
    >
    >Do you think that your Sunpak 622 can work SAFELY with P850? How about
    >Sunpak 383?
    >
    >
    >Thanks a lot again, Ron!
    >Dom
    >
    >
    >

    Hi Dom,

    Sorry I did not see this online till now.

    As to the P20 Flash, it does not have a swivel feature. Rather, it will
    move up and down 90 degrees but not from side to side. No there is no
    extra light on the P20 for preflash, etc. It is a dedicated flash,
    however, and is very efficient in that regard. Also, the P850 does not
    have an external flash port, just the shoe (the P880 does). So, unless
    you have the accessory adapter from Sunpak to accommodate that
    situation, not the flash will not work. The 622 does have a nice
    handle/camera support as part of the flash unit which makes it easy to
    connect the camera.

    Hope this helps if you did not find the information already.

    Ron Baird
    Eastman Kodak Company
     
    Ron Baird, Dec 14, 2005
    #6
  7. Ron Baird Guest

    wrote:

    >Thanks Ron, for your time to reply. I have a few more questions
    >
    >- Do you know if P20 head can swivel (good for bounced back flash of
    >portrait photo)?
    >
    >- For my brief use of my P850, it does have problem with indoor
    >(relatively low-light) auto-focussing. Is it due to the missing AF
    >illuminator? Do you know if P20 has such a AF illuminator that can
    >improve the low-light focussing of my P850. Otherwise, how can I
    >achieve better result with indoor (or low-light condition) photos?
    >
    >- I do like a dedicated TTL flash too. It's very handy. Don't get me
    >wrong. In fact, I also own a Canon dedicated flash 380EX for my old
    >Canon Rebel G (BTW, a disappointing 35 mm camera). A problem with
    >dedicated flash is that it cannot be transferred to any camera of
    >another brand. For example, my Canon Flash cannot be used with my new
    >Kodak P850 now. That's certainly another consideration.
    >
    >Do you think that your Sunpak 622 can work SAFELY with P850? How about
    >Sunpak 383?
    >
    >
    >Thanks a lot again, Ron!
    >Dom
    >
    >
    >

    Hi Dom,

    Sorry I did not see this online till now.

    As to the P20 Flash, it does not have a swivel feature. Rather, it will
    move up and down 90 degrees but not from side to side. No there is no
    extra light on the P20 for preflash, etc. It is a dedicated flash,
    however, and is very efficient in that regard. Also, the P850 does not
    have an external flash port, just the shoe (the P880 does). So, unless
    you have the accessory adapter from Sunpak to accommodate that
    situation, not the flash will not work. The 622 does have a nice
    handle/camera support as part of the flash unit which makes it easy to
    connect the camera.

    Hope this helps if you did not find the information already.

    Ron Baird
    Eastman Kodak Company
     
    Ron Baird, Dec 14, 2005
    #7
  8. Guest

    Hi Ron,

    Thank you so much for your time to follow up my questions. I really
    appreciate that.

    Please, please don't take my comments as offensive. I just wanna
    discuss the possibilty of issues here.

    Back to the focusing issue. In fact, there are two separate issues

    1. Low-light focusing problem - Apparently, I'm not the only one who
    experience this issue.
    "Low light focusing was not good. "
    http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/kodak/p850-review/index.shtml

    "The big limitation of the P850 for low light shooting is its autofocus
    system. It had quite a bit of trouble focusing in even moderately dim
    lighting, and has no AF assist lamp to aid it in dark conditions. The
    end result is that we had to manually focus the camera throughout most
    of this test. "
    http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/P850/P850A.HTM

    2. "Soft focus". Even though the focus-OK green light was displayed,
    some of the photos turned out to be out-of-focus. I'm a kinda
    "traditional" photographer. I don't use "multi-focus-point" mode. I
    select center-focus to make sure that it knows where I really want the
    focus is on. Still, it turns out that about 30% ( or higher, but not
    scientific statistics) photos are not quite sharp. I can post / email
    sample photos for you to examine. Is it the issue of my camera only?

    BTW, I'm not sure if dcresource found the same problem that I'm
    experiencing...

    "Images can be fuzzy at times;"
    http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/kodak/p850-review/index.shtml

    Is there any way that I can get around the problem? Do I get a
    defective camera?

    Dominic


    Ron Baird wrote:
    > Hi Dom,
    >
    > Again, my apologies for being late in responding.
    >
    > Actually, the P850 that works well in providing flash synch via the hot
    > shoe. I should have noted that this model does not have an external port for
    > standard synch cords, however, so if you want to use a non shoe type flash,
    > you need an accessory adapter to fit onto the shoe. I find the P20 does a
    > really nice job. Experiment with it a bit before taking any serious
    > pictures, the same as you would any other accessory.
    >
    > Your concern about the camera not focusing in low light is not a known issue
    > with that camera. The camera has a 25 zone TTL metering system and can do
    > multi-pattern, center-weighted, center spot, selectable zone metering modes.
    > If you are not getting what you want during metering, try adjusting the
    > camera to a zone better suited for low light, i.e. multi-pattern. See what
    > happens. You can also use the over and under options to increase and or
    > decrease exposure based on results.
    >
    > Also, the flash does not have a swivel head just the up and down option. It
    > should accommodate the Sunpak 383 and other hot shoe mounted flashes.
    >
    > Sorry to be late, I will be around more now that I have returned.
    >
    > Talk to you soon,
    >
    > Ron Baird
    > Eastman Kodak Company
    >
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Thanks Ron, for your time to reply. I have a few more questions
    > >
    > > - Do you know if P20 head can swivel (good for bounced back flash of
    > > portrait photo)?
    > >
    > > - For my brief use of my P850, it does have problem with indoor
    > > (relatively low-light) auto-focussing. Is it due to the missing AF
    > > illuminator? Do you know if P20 has such a AF illuminator that can
    > > improve the low-light focussing of my P850. Otherwise, how can I
    > > achieve better result with indoor (or low-light condition) photos?
    > >
    > > - I do like a dedicated TTL flash too. It's very handy. Don't get me
    > > wrong. In fact, I also own a Canon dedicated flash 380EX for my old
    > > Canon Rebel G (BTW, a disappointing 35 mm camera). A problem with
    > > dedicated flash is that it cannot be transferred to any camera of
    > > another brand. For example, my Canon Flash cannot be used with my new
    > > Kodak P850 now. That's certainly another consideration.
    > >
    > > Do you think that your Sunpak 622 can work SAFELY with P850? How about
    > > Sunpak 383?
    > >
    > >
    > > Thanks a lot again, Ron!
    > > Dom
    > >
     
    , Dec 21, 2005
    #8
  9. Roots750 Guest

    Dominic, for what they are worth here are my two cents.
    First I am not a professional photographer, but I do consider myself to be a
    competent consumer camera user. Over the past 40 years I have used many
    types of cameras and my first digital was a Kodak DX3215 several years ago.
    Wanting to take advantage of the long zoom technology I purchased a Kodak
    DX6490 when it first came out. I can't complain about the design of the
    camera or the quality of the pictures, however what irked me most was its
    inability to focus in low light. Unexpectedly after just 16 months the EVF
    became unusable, after being quoted $320 for repairs by a Kodak repair
    center and wanting to stay with the home team I decided to try out the P850
    (opening the box I discovered it was made in China).
    I found the P850 to be well designed, easy to use and loaded with many
    features not found on other more expensive cameras in the same class. After
    using the camera for two weeks a couple of things really bothered me.
    Although it was better than the 6490, the P850 had a difficult time focusing
    in low light. I'm not talking dark, just normal indoor lighting, with the
    end result more often than not, being a fuzzy picture - whether auto or one
    of the other modes were used.The other issue was the flash that is supposed
    to pop up when needed, it can't be operated manually. Quite often when
    shooting indoors the flash would pop up the exposure and focus would be
    indicated as OK, but when the shutter was pressed the flash didn't fire
    resulting in severely underexposed pictures.
    I'm not trying to bash Kodak here just tell you what my experiences were. I
    really tried to like the P850 and there is an awful lot to like about the
    camera, but I would have to agree with you and the sources you quoted - low
    light focusing seems to be a problem. Ron Baird has helped me out a few
    times on this forum and I respect his opinions, however he does work for the
    company. I have since returned the P850 and will do a little more research
    before my next purchase.

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi Ron,
    >
    > Thank you so much for your time to follow up my questions. I really
    > appreciate that.
    >
    > Please, please don't take my comments as offensive. I just wanna
    > discuss the possibilty of issues here.
    >
    > Back to the focusing issue. In fact, there are two separate issues
    >
    > 1. Low-light focusing problem - Apparently, I'm not the only one who
    > experience this issue.
    > "Low light focusing was not good. "
    > http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/kodak/p850-review/index.shtml
    >
    > "The big limitation of the P850 for low light shooting is its autofocus
    > system. It had quite a bit of trouble focusing in even moderately dim
    > lighting, and has no AF assist lamp to aid it in dark conditions. The
    > end result is that we had to manually focus the camera throughout most
    > of this test. "
    > http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/P850/P850A.HTM
    >
    > 2. "Soft focus". Even though the focus-OK green light was displayed,
    > some of the photos turned out to be out-of-focus. I'm a kinda
    > "traditional" photographer. I don't use "multi-focus-point" mode. I
    > select center-focus to make sure that it knows where I really want the
    > focus is on. Still, it turns out that about 30% ( or higher, but not
    > scientific statistics) photos are not quite sharp. I can post / email
    > sample photos for you to examine. Is it the issue of my camera only?
    >
    > BTW, I'm not sure if dcresource found the same problem that I'm
    > experiencing...
    >
    > "Images can be fuzzy at times;"
    > http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/kodak/p850-review/index.shtml
    >
    > Is there any way that I can get around the problem? Do I get a
    > defective camera?
    >
    > Dominic
    >
    >
    > Ron Baird wrote:
    > > Hi Dom,
    > >
    > > Again, my apologies for being late in responding.
    > >
    > > Actually, the P850 that works well in providing flash synch via the hot
    > > shoe. I should have noted that this model does not have an external port

    for
    > > standard synch cords, however, so if you want to use a non shoe type

    flash,
    > > you need an accessory adapter to fit onto the shoe. I find the P20 does

    a
    > > really nice job. Experiment with it a bit before taking any serious
    > > pictures, the same as you would any other accessory.
    > >
    > > Your concern about the camera not focusing in low light is not a known

    issue
    > > with that camera. The camera has a 25 zone TTL metering system and can

    do
    > > multi-pattern, center-weighted, center spot, selectable zone metering

    modes.
    > > If you are not getting what you want during metering, try adjusting the
    > > camera to a zone better suited for low light, i.e. multi-pattern. See

    what
    > > happens. You can also use the over and under options to increase and or
    > > decrease exposure based on results.
    > >
    > > Also, the flash does not have a swivel head just the up and down option.

    It
    > > should accommodate the Sunpak 383 and other hot shoe mounted flashes.
    > >
    > > Sorry to be late, I will be around more now that I have returned.
    > >
    > > Talk to you soon,
    > >
    > > Ron Baird
    > > Eastman Kodak Company
    > >
    > >
    > > <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Thanks Ron, for your time to reply. I have a few more questions
    > > >
    > > > - Do you know if P20 head can swivel (good for bounced back flash of
    > > > portrait photo)?
    > > >
    > > > - For my brief use of my P850, it does have problem with indoor
    > > > (relatively low-light) auto-focussing. Is it due to the missing AF
    > > > illuminator? Do you know if P20 has such a AF illuminator that can
    > > > improve the low-light focussing of my P850. Otherwise, how can I
    > > > achieve better result with indoor (or low-light condition) photos?
    > > >
    > > > - I do like a dedicated TTL flash too. It's very handy. Don't get me
    > > > wrong. In fact, I also own a Canon dedicated flash 380EX for my old
    > > > Canon Rebel G (BTW, a disappointing 35 mm camera). A problem with
    > > > dedicated flash is that it cannot be transferred to any camera of
    > > > another brand. For example, my Canon Flash cannot be used with my new
    > > > Kodak P850 now. That's certainly another consideration.
    > > >
    > > > Do you think that your Sunpak 622 can work SAFELY with P850? How about
    > > > Sunpak 383?
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Thanks a lot again, Ron!
    > > > Dom
    > > >

    >
     
    Roots750, Dec 22, 2005
    #9
  10. Ron Baird Guest

    wrote:

    >Hi Ron,
    >
    >Thank you so much for your time to follow up my questions. I really
    >appreciate that.
    >
    >Please, please don't take my comments as offensive. I just wanna
    >discuss the possibilty of issues here.
    >
    >Back to the focusing issue. In fact, there are two separate issues
    >
    >1. Low-light focusing problem - Apparently, I'm not the only one who
    >experience this issue.
    >"Low light focusing was not good. "
    >http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/kodak/p850-review/index.shtml
    >
    >"The big limitation of the P850 for low light shooting is its autofocus
    >system. It had quite a bit of trouble focusing in even moderately dim
    >lighting, and has no AF assist lamp to aid it in dark conditions. The
    >end result is that we had to manually focus the camera throughout most
    >of this test. "
    >http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/P850/P850A.HTM
    >
    >2. "Soft focus". Even though the focus-OK green light was displayed,
    >some of the photos turned out to be out-of-focus. I'm a kinda
    >"traditional" photographer. I don't use "multi-focus-point" mode. I
    >select center-focus to make sure that it knows where I really want the
    >focus is on. Still, it turns out that about 30% ( or higher, but not
    >scientific statistics) photos are not quite sharp. I can post / email
    >sample photos for you to examine. Is it the issue of my camera only?
    >
    >BTW, I'm not sure if dcresource found the same problem that I'm
    >experiencing...
    >
    >"Images can be fuzzy at times;"
    >http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/kodak/p850-review/index.shtml
    >
    >Is there any way that I can get around the problem? Do I get a
    >defective camera?
    >
    >Dominic
    >
    >
    >Ron Baird wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hi Dom,
    >>
    >>Again, my apologies for being late in responding.
    >>
    >>Actually, the P850 that works well in providing flash synch via the hot
    >>shoe. I should have noted that this model does not have an external port for
    >>standard synch cords, however, so if you want to use a non shoe type flash,
    >>you need an accessory adapter to fit onto the shoe. I find the P20 does a
    >>really nice job. Experiment with it a bit before taking any serious
    >>pictures, the same as you would any other accessory.
    >>
    >>Your concern about the camera not focusing in low light is not a known issue
    >>with that camera. The camera has a 25 zone TTL metering system and can do
    >>multi-pattern, center-weighted, center spot, selectable zone metering modes.
    >>If you are not getting what you want during metering, try adjusting the
    >>camera to a zone better suited for low light, i.e. multi-pattern. See what
    >>happens. You can also use the over and under options to increase and or
    >>decrease exposure based on results.
    >>
    >>Also, the flash does not have a swivel head just the up and down option. It
    >>should accommodate the Sunpak 383 and other hot shoe mounted flashes.
    >>
    >>Sorry to be late, I will be around more now that I have returned.
    >>
    >>Talk to you soon,
    >>
    >>Ron Baird
    >>Eastman Kodak Company
    >>
    >>
    >><> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>
    >>
    >>>Thanks Ron, for your time to reply. I have a few more questions
    >>>
    >>>- Do you know if P20 head can swivel (good for bounced back flash of
    >>>portrait photo)?
    >>>
    >>>- For my brief use of my P850, it does have problem with indoor
    >>>(relatively low-light) auto-focussing. Is it due to the missing AF
    >>>illuminator? Do you know if P20 has such a AF illuminator that can
    >>>improve the low-light focussing of my P850. Otherwise, how can I
    >>>achieve better result with indoor (or low-light condition) photos?
    >>>
    >>>- I do like a dedicated TTL flash too. It's very handy. Don't get me
    >>>wrong. In fact, I also own a Canon dedicated flash 380EX for my old
    >>>Canon Rebel G (BTW, a disappointing 35 mm camera). A problem with
    >>>dedicated flash is that it cannot be transferred to any camera of
    >>>another brand. For example, my Canon Flash cannot be used with my new
    >>>Kodak P850 now. That's certainly another consideration.
    >>>
    >>>Do you think that your Sunpak 622 can work SAFELY with P850? How about
    >>>Sunpak 383?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Thanks a lot again, Ron!
    >>>Dom
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >
    >
    >

    My apologies Dominic,

    I have been off on vacation and catching up for the last two weeks and
    am just now getting back to the newsgroups. I did not see your message
    till today. I am glad to follow on.

    Since the camera uses many features to get the right exposure, you can
    adjust any noted settings to provide the same exposure, but with a
    smaller aperture to increase the chance of more of the picture being in
    the right depth of field. Use the right mode and change the focus
    qualityl. You can use all the features of the camera to control your
    images and that is the likely best bet in this case. If the images you
    are getting are soft, what modes are you in, and are you in low light.
    The camera will try to adjust itself for maximum results and may be
    using a large aperture causing you to lose some focus points in your
    scene. I should recall samples, but I can't at this point. Send some
    along and I will be glad to review for you. Remember you need to make a
    good choice between size of aperture and shutter speed. Either one can
    cause your images to be ever so slightly 'out of focus.'

    Part of the issue we're seeing with focus is in the speed and the amount
    of time required to clear the buffer memory of the previous image data.
    Not so much on the 850 but more on the 880. Also, we are taking all
    these things into consideration, along with user comments that we gather
    from tech areas and the experiences noted here. We have a list of
    improvements we are considering for possible firmware updates in the
    future., but at this point I can't promise one. Please be assured,
    however, that we are always listening to feedback from our users, i.e. you.

    Talk to you soon,

    Ron Baird
     
    Ron Baird, Jan 6, 2006
    #10
  11. Ron Baird Guest

    Roots750 wrote:

    >Dominic, for what they are worth here are my two cents.
    >First I am not a professional photographer, but I do consider myself to be a
    >competent consumer camera user. Over the past 40 years I have used many
    >types of cameras and my first digital was a Kodak DX3215 several years ago.
    >Wanting to take advantage of the long zoom technology I purchased a Kodak
    >DX6490 when it first came out. I can't complain about the design of the
    >camera or the quality of the pictures, however what irked me most was its
    >inability to focus in low light. Unexpectedly after just 16 months the EVF
    >became unusable, after being quoted $320 for repairs by a Kodak repair
    >center and wanting to stay with the home team I decided to try out the P850
    >(opening the box I discovered it was made in China).
    >I found the P850 to be well designed, easy to use and loaded with many
    >features not found on other more expensive cameras in the same class. After
    >using the camera for two weeks a couple of things really bothered me.
    >Although it was better than the 6490, the P850 had a difficult time focusing
    >in low light. I'm not talking dark, just normal indoor lighting, with the
    >end result more often than not, being a fuzzy picture - whether auto or one
    >of the other modes were used.The other issue was the flash that is supposed
    >to pop up when needed, it can't be operated manually. Quite often when
    >shooting indoors the flash would pop up the exposure and focus would be
    >indicated as OK, but when the shutter was pressed the flash didn't fire
    >resulting in severely underexposed pictures.
    >I'm not trying to bash Kodak here just tell you what my experiences were. I
    >really tried to like the P850 and there is an awful lot to like about the
    >camera, but I would have to agree with you and the sources you quoted - low
    >light focusing seems to be a problem. Ron Baird has helped me out a few
    >times on this forum and I respect his opinions, however he does work for the
    >company. I have since returned the P850 and will do a little more research
    >before my next purchase.
    >
    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >
    >
    >>Hi Ron,
    >>
    >>Thank you so much for your time to follow up my questions. I really
    >>appreciate that.
    >>
    >>Please, please don't take my comments as offensive. I just wanna
    >>discuss the possibilty of issues here.
    >>
    >>Back to the focusing issue. In fact, there are two separate issues
    >>
    >>1. Low-light focusing problem - Apparently, I'm not the only one who
    >>experience this issue.
    >>"Low light focusing was not good. "
    >>http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/kodak/p850-review/index.shtml
    >>
    >>"The big limitation of the P850 for low light shooting is its autofocus
    >>system. It had quite a bit of trouble focusing in even moderately dim
    >>lighting, and has no AF assist lamp to aid it in dark conditions. The
    >>end result is that we had to manually focus the camera throughout most
    >>of this test. "
    >>http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/P850/P850A.HTM
    >>
    >>2. "Soft focus". Even though the focus-OK green light was displayed,
    >>some of the photos turned out to be out-of-focus. I'm a kinda
    >>"traditional" photographer. I don't use "multi-focus-point" mode. I
    >>select center-focus to make sure that it knows where I really want the
    >>focus is on. Still, it turns out that about 30% ( or higher, but not
    >>scientific statistics) photos are not quite sharp. I can post / email
    >>sample photos for you to examine. Is it the issue of my camera only?
    >>
    >>BTW, I'm not sure if dcresource found the same problem that I'm
    >>experiencing...
    >>
    >>"Images can be fuzzy at times;"
    >>http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/kodak/p850-review/index.shtml
    >>
    >>Is there any way that I can get around the problem? Do I get a
    >>defective camera?
    >>
    >>Dominic
    >>
    >>
    >>Ron Baird wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Hi Dom,
    >>>
    >>>Again, my apologies for being late in responding.
    >>>
    >>>Actually, the P850 that works well in providing flash synch via the hot
    >>>shoe. I should have noted that this model does not have an external port
    >>>
    >>>

    >for
    >
    >
    >>>standard synch cords, however, so if you want to use a non shoe type
    >>>
    >>>

    >flash,
    >
    >
    >>>you need an accessory adapter to fit onto the shoe. I find the P20 does
    >>>
    >>>

    >a
    >
    >
    >>>really nice job. Experiment with it a bit before taking any serious
    >>>pictures, the same as you would any other accessory.
    >>>
    >>>Your concern about the camera not focusing in low light is not a known
    >>>
    >>>

    >issue
    >
    >
    >>>with that camera. The camera has a 25 zone TTL metering system and can
    >>>
    >>>

    >do
    >
    >
    >>>multi-pattern, center-weighted, center spot, selectable zone metering
    >>>
    >>>

    >modes.
    >
    >
    >>>If you are not getting what you want during metering, try adjusting the
    >>>camera to a zone better suited for low light, i.e. multi-pattern. See
    >>>
    >>>

    >what
    >
    >
    >>>happens. You can also use the over and under options to increase and or
    >>>decrease exposure based on results.
    >>>
    >>>Also, the flash does not have a swivel head just the up and down option.
    >>>
    >>>

    >It
    >
    >
    >>>should accommodate the Sunpak 383 and other hot shoe mounted flashes.
    >>>
    >>>Sorry to be late, I will be around more now that I have returned.
    >>>
    >>>Talk to you soon,
    >>>
    >>>Ron Baird
    >>>Eastman Kodak Company
    >>>
    >>>
    >>><> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Thanks Ron, for your time to reply. I have a few more questions
    >>>>
    >>>>- Do you know if P20 head can swivel (good for bounced back flash of
    >>>>portrait photo)?
    >>>>
    >>>>- For my brief use of my P850, it does have problem with indoor
    >>>>(relatively low-light) auto-focussing. Is it due to the missing AF
    >>>>illuminator? Do you know if P20 has such a AF illuminator that can
    >>>>improve the low-light focussing of my P850. Otherwise, how can I
    >>>>achieve better result with indoor (or low-light condition) photos?
    >>>>
    >>>>- I do like a dedicated TTL flash too. It's very handy. Don't get me
    >>>>wrong. In fact, I also own a Canon dedicated flash 380EX for my old
    >>>>Canon Rebel G (BTW, a disappointing 35 mm camera). A problem with
    >>>>dedicated flash is that it cannot be transferred to any camera of
    >>>>another brand. For example, my Canon Flash cannot be used with my new
    >>>>Kodak P850 now. That's certainly another consideration.
    >>>>
    >>>>Do you think that your Sunpak 622 can work SAFELY with P850? How about
    >>>>Sunpak 383?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks a lot again, Ron!
    >>>>Dom
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>

    >
    >
    >
    >

    Greetings Roots,

    Sorry to hear about the trouble with your cameras. Yikes the repair
    suggestion sounds quite high. Are you in the US? If you are I would be
    glad to review your situation.

    As I noted in an earlier post, we are gathering information on reported
    experiences and hopefully will be releasing some new firmware with
    several changes. Many of the concerns can be remedied by adjusting the
    camera settings (there are many as you know). As to the flash, there are
    a number of settings under which the flash will not open and flash even
    in low light. Might you have been using one of them? Anyway, sorry I did
    not see your posts on those experiences as I would have tried to make a
    difference for you.

    Talk to you soon, Roots,

    Ron Baird
    Eastman Kodak Company
     
    Ron Baird, Jan 6, 2006
    #11
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