Recommended Access Points

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Ray, Jun 26, 2004.

  1. Ray

    Ray Guest

    We have a local LAN in our company where is about 12,000sq ft in a rectangle
    shape. Recently, about half of 30 desktop pcs have been changed to notebook
    pcs that are equipped with wireless LAN. Thus, we need to extend our wired
    network to wireless network.

    Can we buy a couple of APs (I assume they are for home use) on the market or
    need to buy some special APs for office use. Are there any differences? Do
    you have any idea how many APs for our office use? I appreciate your shared
    experience in this type.

    Thanks,

    Ray
     
    Ray, Jun 26, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Ray

    Henry Cherry Guest

    I have deployed several Cisco Aironet 1200 APs. These support WPA,
    etc.....have power over Ethernet injectors and were about $700.00 each. The
    range is pretty impressive and you can purchase antenna's that will extend
    the range if you need to....

    Hank

    "Ray" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > We have a local LAN in our company where is about 12,000sq ft in a

    rectangle
    > shape. Recently, about half of 30 desktop pcs have been changed to

    notebook
    > pcs that are equipped with wireless LAN. Thus, we need to extend our

    wired
    > network to wireless network.
    >
    > Can we buy a couple of APs (I assume they are for home use) on the market

    or
    > need to buy some special APs for office use. Are there any differences?

    Do
    > you have any idea how many APs for our office use? I appreciate your

    shared
    > experience in this type.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Ray
    >
    >
     
    Henry Cherry, Jun 26, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Ray

    Ray Guest

    Herry,

    Thanks for your recommendation. Cisco costs USD$700 while Netgear costs
    USD$70. Both supports 128-bit wep encryption. Do you have any idea the
    differences in between to justify the 10 times price differences.

    Thanks,

    Ray

    "Henry Cherry" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > I have deployed several Cisco Aironet 1200 APs. These support WPA,
    > etc.....have power over Ethernet injectors and were about $700.00 each.

    The
    > range is pretty impressive and you can purchase antenna's that will extend
    > the range if you need to....
    >
    > Hank
    >
    > "Ray" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > We have a local LAN in our company where is about 12,000sq ft in a

    > rectangle
    > > shape. Recently, about half of 30 desktop pcs have been changed to

    > notebook
    > > pcs that are equipped with wireless LAN. Thus, we need to extend our

    > wired
    > > network to wireless network.
    > >
    > > Can we buy a couple of APs (I assume they are for home use) on the

    market
    > or
    > > need to buy some special APs for office use. Are there any differences?

    > Do
    > > you have any idea how many APs for our office use? I appreciate your

    > shared
    > > experience in this type.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Ray
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Ray, Jun 27, 2004
    #3
  4. Ray

    Ed Guest

    It's easy. Cisco is an enterprise class Wifi. Netgear is not. You have a
    decent size office with 30 computers. I don't think you are running a
    couple of netgear routers in place and a gateway or dell desktop running as
    a server?

    Enterprise class equipment offer reliability and manageability. The Cisco
    offer's upgradeability through a cardbus, firmware, antenna upgrades, and
    management through SNMP, Telnet, and via a webbrowser. Netgear's $70 wi-fi
    is WYSIWYG. If you need an omnidirectional antenna with netgear, well,
    ummm. Hopefully someone will make one, Cisco, call them up. If your
    company is growing, you want equipment that will grow with it. It is
    possible to manage the traffic on the Cisco routers. Suppose the President
    of the company brings his laptop in and connects to the wi-fi network. He's
    trying to sell a client in on a product with a big presentation that's on
    the server. He then looses his wi-fi connection and can't connect back in.
    He runs to you and ask what happen. If you were running a netgear router,
    you can just tell him, "I don't know, since the little lights are blinking
    on & off the router, you should be connected. I don't know why you are
    not". Good answer, right? Well, with a Cisco router, you can discover if
    there is an signal loss or packet loss. Then come up with a solution so
    that it NEVER happens again, especially to him. Makes you look DAMN GOOD!
    ;)

    For a business, every minute of downtown is money lost.

    "Ray" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Herry,
    >
    > Thanks for your recommendation. Cisco costs USD$700 while Netgear costs
    > USD$70. Both supports 128-bit wep encryption. Do you have any idea the
    > differences in between to justify the 10 times price differences.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Ray
    >
    > "Henry Cherry" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    > > I have deployed several Cisco Aironet 1200 APs. These support WPA,
    > > etc.....have power over Ethernet injectors and were about $700.00 each.

    > The
    > > range is pretty impressive and you can purchase antenna's that will

    extend
    > > the range if you need to....
    > >
    > > Hank
    > >
    > > "Ray" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > We have a local LAN in our company where is about 12,000sq ft in a

    > > rectangle
    > > > shape. Recently, about half of 30 desktop pcs have been changed to

    > > notebook
    > > > pcs that are equipped with wireless LAN. Thus, we need to extend our

    > > wired
    > > > network to wireless network.
    > > >
    > > > Can we buy a couple of APs (I assume they are for home use) on the

    > market
    > > or
    > > > need to buy some special APs for office use. Are there any

    differences?
    > > Do
    > > > you have any idea how many APs for our office use? I appreciate your

    > > shared
    > > > experience in this type.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > >
    > > > Ray
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Ed, Jun 27, 2004
    #4
  5. Ray

    Jack Guest

    Hi.

    ....And the Cisco is 100mW radio as oppose to Entry Level Wireless with the
    sub 50mW.

    ...And many Pros feel that the Cisco is overpriced and use Proxim
    Professional line.

    Stability and durability is very important in the business envioroment. You
    can install Entry Level devices and save few hundreds $$$ and then you would
    spend thousands of $$$ to pay employees and consultants in order to keep it
    alive.

    However if you have a small installation and know how to "fiddle" with it
    yourself you can happily use (like I do) Entry Level Wireless gear for
    professional work.



    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    www.ezlan.net




    "Ed" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > It's easy. Cisco is an enterprise class Wifi. Netgear is not. You have

    a
    > decent size office with 30 computers. I don't think you are running a
    > couple of netgear routers in place and a gateway or dell desktop running

    as
    > a server?
    >
    > Enterprise class equipment offer reliability and manageability. The Cisco
    > offer's upgradeability through a cardbus, firmware, antenna upgrades, and
    > management through SNMP, Telnet, and via a webbrowser. Netgear's $70

    wi-fi
    > is WYSIWYG. If you need an omnidirectional antenna with netgear, well,
    > ummm. Hopefully someone will make one, Cisco, call them up. If your
    > company is growing, you want equipment that will grow with it. It is
    > possible to manage the traffic on the Cisco routers. Suppose the

    President
    > of the company brings his laptop in and connects to the wi-fi network.

    He's
    > trying to sell a client in on a product with a big presentation that's on
    > the server. He then looses his wi-fi connection and can't connect back

    in.
    > He runs to you and ask what happen. If you were running a netgear router,
    > you can just tell him, "I don't know, since the little lights are blinking
    > on & off the router, you should be connected. I don't know why you are
    > not". Good answer, right? Well, with a Cisco router, you can discover if
    > there is an signal loss or packet loss. Then come up with a solution so
    > that it NEVER happens again, especially to him. Makes you look DAMN GOOD!
    > ;)
    >
    > For a business, every minute of downtown is money lost.
    >
    > "Ray" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    > > Herry,
    > >
    > > Thanks for your recommendation. Cisco costs USD$700 while Netgear costs
    > > USD$70. Both supports 128-bit wep encryption. Do you have any idea the
    > > differences in between to justify the 10 times price differences.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Ray
    > >
    > > "Henry Cherry" <> wrote in message
    > > news:%...
    > > > I have deployed several Cisco Aironet 1200 APs. These support WPA,
    > > > etc.....have power over Ethernet injectors and were about $700.00

    each.
    > > The
    > > > range is pretty impressive and you can purchase antenna's that will

    > extend
    > > > the range if you need to....
    > > >
    > > > Hank
    > > >
    > > > "Ray" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:...
    > > > > We have a local LAN in our company where is about 12,000sq ft in a
    > > > rectangle
    > > > > shape. Recently, about half of 30 desktop pcs have been changed to
    > > > notebook
    > > > > pcs that are equipped with wireless LAN. Thus, we need to extend

    our
    > > > wired
    > > > > network to wireless network.
    > > > >
    > > > > Can we buy a couple of APs (I assume they are for home use) on the

    > > market
    > > > or
    > > > > need to buy some special APs for office use. Are there any

    > differences?
    > > > Do
    > > > > you have any idea how many APs for our office use? I appreciate

    your
    > > > shared
    > > > > experience in this type.
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanks,
    > > > >
    > > > > Ray
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Jack, Jun 27, 2004
    #5
  6. Ray

    Guest Guest

    Be acrefull with the "more powerfull" Cisco's....that is
    only the link from the AP to the PC.....Still your PC
    Wifi card must be able to match this, if not there will
    be no uplink connection....
    In other words, the link must be more or less balanced to
    work.....
    >-----Original Message-----
    >I have deployed several Cisco Aironet 1200 APs. These

    support WPA,
    >etc.....have power over Ethernet injectors and were

    about $700.00 each. The
    >range is pretty impressive and you can purchase

    antenna's that will extend
    >the range if you need to....
    >
    >Hank
    >
    >"Ray" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> We have a local LAN in our company where is about

    12,000sq ft in a
    >rectangle
    >> shape. Recently, about half of 30 desktop pcs have

    been changed to
    >notebook
    >> pcs that are equipped with wireless LAN. Thus, we

    need to extend our
    >wired
    >> network to wireless network.
    >>
    >> Can we buy a couple of APs (I assume they are for home

    use) on the market
    >or
    >> need to buy some special APs for office use. Are

    there any differences?
    >Do
    >> you have any idea how many APs for our office use? I

    appreciate your
    >shared
    >> experience in this type.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Ray
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    Guest, Jun 29, 2004
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Indy Tech

    SSID for multiple access points

    Indy Tech, Jul 6, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    98,381
    Felipe Zebillin
    Jul 10, 2009
  2. =?Utf-8?B?ZWIxMDM=?=

    RE: Problem with network with 2 access points

    =?Utf-8?B?ZWIxMDM=?=, Aug 5, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,101
    DRIESSEN Michel
    Aug 5, 2004
  3. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    Looking for a list of RADIUS complient Access Points

    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Aug 6, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    909
    Robert R Kircher, Jr.
    Aug 6, 2004
  4. =?Utf-8?B?ZmlsYnVydDE=?=

    Major problems roaming between access points

    =?Utf-8?B?ZmlsYnVydDE=?=, Sep 8, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    3,105
    =?Utf-8?B?ZmlsYnVydDE=?=
    Sep 18, 2004
  5. hmc
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    883
    Pavel A.
    Sep 12, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page