Recomend please - USB voip adaptor

Discussion in 'UK VOIP' started by default, Aug 10, 2008.

  1. default

    default Guest

    Hi,

    Just started using SMSlisto and am very pleased. Quality OK, price
    right. Actually seems better quality than Skype and much cheaper.

    Currently microphone round my neck, caller on the speaker - works
    quite well.

    I'd like to be able to use it around the house and on a wired phone.
    I don't mind having the PC on at all times.
    Not bothered about incoming calls on voip.

    Maplin have a voip / USB adaptor (~15 pounds), several on e-Bay.
    These would allow me to connect any phone - eg a cordless to use it
    round the house and/or a wired phone in my office.

    Recommendations please for such a unit.

    Thanks,

    Fred
     
    default, Aug 10, 2008
    #1
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  2. default

    Iain Guest

    default wrote:

    > Not bothered about incoming calls on voip.


    Seems daft to me. Thats the main benefit!

    > Maplin have a voip / USB adaptor (~15 pounds), several on e-Bay.
    > These would allow me to connect any phone - eg a cordless to use it
    > round the house and/or a wired phone in my office.
    >
    > Recommendations please for such a unit.



    Yes, I recommend that you don't buy such a unit.

    Buy an Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA) and plug a proper phone in, so you
    don't need a computer running to make a call.

    Slightly more expensive, but a far better solution that you won't throw
    away, as you would with the USB effort.
     
    Iain, Aug 10, 2008
    #2
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  3. default

    Al Guest

    "Iain" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > default wrote:
    >
    >> Not bothered about incoming calls on voip.

    >
    > Seems daft to me. Thats the main benefit!
    >
    >> Maplin have a voip / USB adaptor (~15 pounds), several on e-Bay.
    >> These would allow me to connect any phone - eg a cordless to use it
    >> round the house and/or a wired phone in my office.
    >>
    >> Recommendations please for such a unit.

    >
    >
    > Yes, I recommend that you don't buy such a unit.
    >
    > Buy an Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA) and plug a proper phone in, so you
    > don't need a computer running to make a call.
    >
    > Slightly more expensive, but a far better solution that you won't throw
    > away, as you would with the USB effort.


    I can second that worthy sentiment.
     
    Al, Aug 10, 2008
    #3
  4. default

    Brian A Guest

    On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 02:49:30 +0100, "Martin²" <> wrote:

    >Don't buy USB adaptor, nor ATA, buy Siemens S475 IP phone instead,
    >as discussed in other thread.
    >Not cheap, but by far the best solution.
    >Regards,
    >Martin
    >

    You mentioned that you are not bothered about incoming calls so, what
    I assume from that is that you are happy to continue to receive calls
    on your standard landline.
    If that is so I would go for the Linksys SPA-3102.
    The reason for this is that you can integrate your voip and landline
    calls.
    Remember, if you go down the ATA route you don't need to have a
    computer switched on. It is not like toytown voip where you have to
    sit at your computer. Connect your ATA to a set of cordless phones and
    you can call out at will - no computer whirring away and costing you
    £5/month to run.
    However, if you reconsider taking incoming calls via voip then the
    advantages this affords includes :-
    Customisable voicemail - none of this BT 1571 rubbish
    Call waiting
    Caller display
    PLUS
    With your SPA-3102, distinctive ringing.
    Call forwarding via voxalot.
    Please note that the router part of the 3102 is, afaik, only really
    useful on a cable connection and that any ATA is best connected to a
    router with Quality of Service as an inbuilt feature (though this is
    not essential).
    My advice would be, initially at least, to continue taking calls on
    your standard landline and then consider later if you want to receive
    calls via voip as an alternative.

    ---
    Remove 'no_spam_' from email address.
    ---
     
    Brian A, Aug 11, 2008
    #4
  5. default

    default Guest

    Thanks for all the excellent informed inputs.
    Yes, I suppose sitting at he PC to make phone calls is toytown voip
    Fred
     
    default, Aug 11, 2008
    #5
  6. default <> wrote:
    > Thanks for all the excellent informed inputs.
    > Yes, I suppose sitting at he PC to make phone calls is toytown voip


    If you were the same 'default' who was asking similar on uk.telecom the
    other day, I only suggested a USB-phone adaptor because you said you wanted
    a PC solution. If you don't want a PC solution then an ATA makes a lot of
    sense. The downside is you won't be able to use it for Skype, but then if
    you want to call people on real telephones SIP is generally much more
    flexible.

    Theo
     
    Theo Markettos, Aug 11, 2008
    #6
  7. default

    default Guest

    On 11 Aug 2008 21:26:28 +0100 (BST), Theo Markettos
    <> wrote:

    >default <> wrote:
    >> Thanks for all the excellent informed inputs.
    >> Yes, I suppose sitting at he PC to make phone calls is toytown voip

    >
    >If you were the same 'default' who was asking similar on uk.telecom the
    >other day, I only suggested a USB-phone adaptor because you said you wanted
    >a PC solution. If you don't want a PC solution then an ATA makes a lot of
    >sense. The downside is you won't be able to use it for Skype, but then if
    >you want to call people on real telephones SIP is generally much more
    >flexible.
    >
    >Theo


    Yes I was on UK.telecom.
    Still in learning mode.
    I actually don't mind the PC being on as it is anyway. Also the
    landline is fine for receiving calls. Also I don't have a router -
    just the cable modem straight into PC.
    Hence I thought your suggestion of a USB voip adaptor was suitable,
    even if a bit toytown.
    Anyway, they are cheap enough that if I bin it, it's no big loss.

    Thanks all

    Fred
     
    default, Aug 12, 2008
    #7
  8. default

    Iain Guest

    default wrote:

    > Also I don't have a router -
    > just the cable modem straight into PC.


    Buy a network switch. Cost about a tenner. Plug the cable modem into one
    port, PC in another, ATA in another.

    You need to power cycle the cable modem after connecting the switch
    instead of the PC. That's all there is to it!
     
    Iain, Aug 12, 2008
    #8
  9. Iain <> wrote:
    > default wrote:
    >
    > > Also I don't have a router -
    > > just the cable modem straight into PC.

    >
    > Buy a network switch. Cost about a tenner. Plug the cable modem into one
    > port, PC in another, ATA in another.


    Won't work I'm afraid. Cable modem will only accept packets from one MAC
    address - the one it gave DHCP to. All the others will be binned - after
    all, they won't have globally-routable IPs.

    You'd need a router. A cheap wired-only router is about 20 quid new, or buy
    one secondhand from someone upgrading to wireless. Alternatively some ATAs
    have built-in routers (like the SPA3102).

    Theo
     
    Theo Markettos, Aug 12, 2008
    #9
  10. default

    Iain Guest

    Theo Markettos wrote:
    > Iain <> wrote:
    >> default wrote:
    >>
    >>> Also I don't have a router -
    >>> just the cable modem straight into PC.

    >> Buy a network switch. Cost about a tenner. Plug the cable modem into one
    >> port, PC in another, ATA in another.

    >
    > Won't work I'm afraid. Cable modem will only accept packets from one MAC
    > address - the one it gave DHCP to. All the others will be binned - after
    > all, they won't have globally-routable IPs.


    Well, I have news for you, sunshine. It works just fine on Virgin Media
    cable broadband, as long as you reset the modem after connecting the
    switch. Did it only last week.
     
    Iain, Aug 12, 2008
    #10
  11. default

    Brian A Guest

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 21:41:20 +0100, Jono <>
    wrote:

    >Iain formulated the question :
    >> Theo Markettos wrote:
    >>> Iain <> wrote:
    >>>> default wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Also I don't have a router -
    >>>>> just the cable modem straight into PC.
    >>>> Buy a network switch. Cost about a tenner. Plug the cable modem into one
    >>>> port, PC in another, ATA in another.
    >>>
    >>> Won't work I'm afraid. Cable modem will only accept packets from one MAC
    >>> address - the one it gave DHCP to. All the others will be binned - after
    >>> all, they won't have globally-routable IPs.

    >>
    >> Well, I have news for you, sunshine. It works just fine on Virgin Media cable
    >> broadband, as long as you reset the modem after connecting the switch. Did it
    >> only last week.

    >
    >Unless you have the old gaming service, VM only provide a single
    >routable IP,
    >
    >So, unless you have a router, or are using ICS etc, what you suggest
    >/shouldn't/ work on a VM cable connection.
    >
    >One device will grab the IP, the other won't be able to access the
    >internet.
    >

    That's the way I would understand it. It needs a NAT to be able to
    provide the local IPs. I wouldn't have thought that a simple switch
    would work and that it would need a router - for example the SPA-3102.
    It is a surprise to me that more than one WAN IP is issued. At least
    that is how I understand what has been stated.

    ---
    Remove 'no_spam_' from email address.
    ---
     
    Brian A, Aug 12, 2008
    #11
  12. default

    Iain Guest

    Jono wrote:

    > Unless you have the old gaming service, VM only provide a single
    > routable IP,
    >
    > So, unless you have a router, or are using ICS etc, what you suggest
    > /shouldn't/ work on a VM cable connection.
    >
    > One device will grab the IP, the other won't be able to access the
    > internet.


    Well, on Monday, three of us were using it at the same time, two on WiFi
    and one wired. Though it is possible that the switch was a router. It
    was a spare one from my odds and ends box.
     
    Iain, Aug 13, 2008
    #12
  13. Iain <> wrote:
    > Well, on Monday, three of us were using it at the same time, two on WiFi
    > and one wired. Though it is possible that the switch was a router. It
    > was a spare one from my odds and ends box.


    How did you manage to do Wifi without a router? The only network switches
    with integrated Wifi I know of are wireless access points. You'd probably
    only have one of those if you got it for a particular reason. It's more
    likely to had a router in your spares box than a WAP.

    Theo
     
    Theo Markettos, Aug 13, 2008
    #13
  14. default

    Iain Guest

    Jono wrote:
    > Theo Markettos expressed precisely :
    >> Iain <> wrote:
    >>> Well, on Monday, three of us were using it at the same time, two on
    >>> WiFi and one wired. Though it is possible that the switch was a
    >>> router. It was a spare one from my odds and ends box.

    >>
    >> How did you manage to do Wifi without a router? The only network
    >> switches
    >> with integrated Wifi I know of are wireless access points. You'd
    >> probably
    >> only have one of those if you got it for a particular reason. It's more
    >> likely to had a router in your spares box than a WAP.
    >>
    >> Theo

    >
    > One connected to the switch on the cable modem and two wirelessly
    > connected to a neighbour's access point.


    Nope. The neighbour's AP is encrypted.

    Yes, this is an AP with four ports. Cable modem in one, PC in another.
    Most APs have no router in them - they're just a network switch with a
    wireless hub attached. But it may have a DHCP server and a router in it
    - this one is pretty old and probably cost a lot. I'll try and remember
    to take a cheap switch and try it next time I'm there, but that'll be
    next month.
     
    Iain, Aug 13, 2008
    #14
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