Rebuilding Computer

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Guest, Oct 31, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I rebuilt my computer in January as it really needed to be refreshed
    after about five years.

    As this was the first time that I did this, I am certain that it did not
    come off properly. I reinstalled Microsoft XP and all the other programmes,
    but it appears that I simply rebuilt the computer over the previous set up
    and operating system. Programmes, such as Norton Firewall, are also still
    there yet I cannot access them.

    Thus, I have the following questions.

    I am going to have to rebuild my computer again in the coming months. Can
    anybody advsie me on how to do this, without simply building over the
    previous operating system and taking up more space on the hard drive?

    Is there any way to access the programmes that I built over, the last time
    that I rebuilt this machine? I would particularly like to get Norton
    Firewall back into my reach. I would also like to know how I can retain
    certain programmes before rebuilding the computer.

    Thanks in advance.
    Guest, Oct 31, 2008
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Paul Guest

    wrote:
    > I rebuilt my computer in January as it really needed to be refreshed
    > after about five years.
    >
    > As this was the first time that I did this, I am certain that it did not
    > come off properly. I reinstalled Microsoft XP and all the other programmes,
    > but it appears that I simply rebuilt the computer over the previous set up
    > and operating system. Programmes, such as Norton Firewall, are also still
    > there yet I cannot access them.
    >
    > Thus, I have the following questions.
    >
    > I am going to have to rebuild my computer again in the coming months. Can
    > anybody advsie me on how to do this, without simply building over the
    > previous operating system and taking up more space on the hard drive?
    >
    > Is there any way to access the programmes that I built over, the last time
    > that I rebuilt this machine? I would particularly like to get Norton
    > Firewall back into my reach. I would also like to know how I can retain
    > certain programmes before rebuilding the computer.
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >


    A "repair install" preserves user settings, and installed programs.

    The repair install takes the OS back to the state it had when it
    was first installed. That means any intervening Service Packs, or
    security patches from Windows Update, have to be put back. If you
    installed a very recent Internet Explorer (like IE7), you'd have
    to reinstall that as well.

    A clean install, on the other hand, is supposed to start at ground zero.
    That disturbs the old installed programs.

    The question now is, what kind of a mess do you have ? Is the mess
    so bad, that a clean install is best ? If you really start clean,
    then you'll have no problem reinstalling all your programs
    again, like Norton if you really want it.

    Any time you're doing major surgery, an extra hard drive or two is
    indispensable. In your case, I would recommend a brand new drive.
    I like to purchase 80GB drives, because they're a single platter
    inside, for best reliability. I connect *only* that drive, then
    do my OS installation. After the machine has been rebooted at least
    once, after the installation process is finished, then I can shut
    down, turn off the power, and install my old drive as a secondary
    drive. On that drive would be my email database, and personal files.
    I could copy these over at leisure, as I reconstruct the new OS
    disk.

    There is supposed to be some Settings Wizard, that transfers settings
    from one OS to another, but I don't know anything about that. You
    can read about it here.

    http://aumha.org/win5/a/fast.php

    If you have sufficient skill, maybe you can figure out the mess
    on your current hard drive, and do a repair install. There
    could be two OS directories, and references in the registry could
    be referring to either OS installation. Just for the record, the
    procedure to apply a repair install to your disk would be here,
    but I cannot predict which OS installation will become the
    "new, fixed" one.

    http://helpdesk.its.uiowa.edu/windows/instructions/repairinstall.htm

    When I mentioned above, that *only* the new disk should be connected
    when installing the OS clean on the disk, that is to avoid little
    surprises, where info from the old disk becomes entwined with the
    new OS installation. If only the new disk is connected to the computer
    when you install the OS, then you know the other disk can play no
    part in the installation. I learned this lesson the hard way, when
    cloning my boot drive, booting the clone, and then discovering
    that the paging file was screwed up, and the clone would not boot.
    A drive that hasn't been booted before, should be "by itself"
    for the first boot. Once I recloned the drive, and connected it
    by itself, it started without a problem. And then I could
    add back the other drive.

    Paul
    Paul, Oct 31, 2008
    #2
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  3. Guest

    bmoag Guest

    You appear to have hosed (as in destroyed) a prior installation of Windows.
    It is not clear what you mean by "rebuild" as you mention only software.
    If you do not have the installation disks for programs like Norton then you
    are out of luck.
    Well, not really. Norton is a resource hog that can be a nightmare to
    uninstall and does not work any better than free alternatives like AVG and
    the XP/Vista firewall. The use of a third party firewalls (Zone Alarm and
    Kimodo are free and superior to Norton) is completely unnecessary for the
    vast majority of users and will only slow performance and make peer to peer
    networking more complex than Microsoft already makes it. So getting rid of
    Norton is actually a good thing.
    Although it is often recommended to reformat your hard drive and reinstall
    programs to boost performance this is not good advice for most users who may
    not have all their old program installation disks, may not have properly
    backed up essential documents and files and will have to battle with
    entities like Microsoft and Adobe to get their software reactivated.
    You have learned this the hard way, I am afraid.
    bmoag, Nov 1, 2008
    #3
  4. Guest

    Paul Guest

    bmoag wrote:
    > You appear to have hosed (as in destroyed) a prior installation of Windows.
    > It is not clear what you mean by "rebuild" as you mention only software.
    > If you do not have the installation disks for programs like Norton then
    > you are out of luck.
    > Well, not really. Norton is a resource hog that can be a nightmare to
    > uninstall and does not work any better than free alternatives like AVG
    > and the XP/Vista firewall. The use of a third party firewalls (Zone
    > Alarm and Kimodo are free and superior to Norton) is completely
    > unnecessary for the vast majority of users and will only slow
    > performance and make peer to peer networking more complex than Microsoft
    > already makes it. So getting rid of Norton is actually a good thing.
    > Although it is often recommended to reformat your hard drive and
    > reinstall programs to boost performance this is not good advice for most
    > users who may not have all their old program installation disks, may not
    > have properly backed up essential documents and files and will have to
    > battle with entities like Microsoft and Adobe to get their software
    > reactivated.
    > You have learned this the hard way, I am afraid.
    >
    >


    If there is email on the C: drive, you'd want to try to recover the
    email database file if you could. There can be all sorts of things
    you forgot about, that might be important to recover.

    Paul
    Paul, Nov 1, 2008
    #4
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    "bmoag" <> wrote in message
    news:4wPOk.3500$...
    > You appear to have hosed (as in destroyed) a prior installation of
    > Windows.
    > It is not clear what you mean by "rebuild" as you mention only software.
    > If you do not have the installation disks for programs like Norton then
    > you are out of luck.
    > Well, not really. Norton is a resource hog that can be a nightmare to
    > uninstall and does not work any better than free alternatives like AVG and
    > the XP/Vista firewall. The use of a third party firewalls (Zone Alarm and
    > Kimodo are free and superior to Norton) is completely unnecessary for the
    > vast majority of users and will only slow performance and make peer to
    > peer networking more complex than Microsoft already makes it. So getting
    > rid of Norton is actually a good thing.
    > Although it is often recommended to reformat your hard drive and reinstall
    > programs to boost performance this is not good advice for most users who
    > may not have all their old program installation disks, may not have
    > properly backed up essential documents and files and will have to battle
    > with entities like Microsoft and Adobe to get their software reactivated.
    > You have learned this the hard way, I am afraid.

    Right, well what we have is two operating systems over one another at the
    moment, which is leaving very little space on my hard drive. Thus, what I
    would like to do is back up my relevant files and reinstall from scratch, so
    that I don't have two operating systems on top of each other.

    Yes, I have the required installation discs.

    Or should I simply reset the computer to restart from when it came out of
    the box?

    One other question, this time about printers.

    I have an Epson Stylus C44UX, and I am having problems printing on it. I
    recently bought cartridges from non-Epson sources, although they are
    compatible with the printer itself. But the problem is that the printer is
    not properly printing out documents -- either the ink is very faint or there
    is severe banding.

    Any advice on this as well?

    I realise that the best advice would be to actually spend the money and buy
    a new computer and printer, because this equipment is starting to get old.
    But the credit crunch ...
    Guest, Nov 1, 2008
    #5
  6. Guest

    Paul Guest

    wrote:

    >
    > One other question, this time about printers.
    >
    > I have an Epson Stylus C44UX, and I am having problems printing on it. I
    > recently bought cartridges from non-Epson sources, although they are
    > compatible with the printer itself. But the problem is that the printer is
    > not properly printing out documents -- either the ink is very faint or there
    > is severe banding.
    >
    > Any advice on this as well?
    >
    > I realise that the best advice would be to actually spend the money and buy
    > a new computer and printer, because this equipment is starting to get old.
    > But the credit crunch ...
    >


    Even when using Epson cartridges, they recommend changing them after six
    months. The viscosity and chemical composition of the ink is critical
    to proper operation. So refills may work, or not work. You really
    need feedback about the refill operation you're using, to know whether
    they have a clue about what to use for a refill. In some cases, depending
    on printer technology, the refill can be an expensive mistake, if the
    thing damaged by the refill material, is expensive to replace.

    http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/...id=33279426&foid=34345&cat=30942&subcat=30926

    Depending on your print volume (prints per month), there is also
    a transition point, where you should be using a color laser, rather
    than color inkjet. The color laser can be cheaper to run, in the long
    run, and have a higher initial cost. And with the laser, at least the
    ink won't dry and clog the head. The potentially most expensive
    part of a laser, is whatever is used as a drum. Some schemes combine
    the toner and drum in the same cartridge, which means the details are
    taken care of for you. When lasers first came out, the drum scheme
    was very expensive to replace, so the employee who damaged one,
    had to be taken outside and shot :)

    As for a new computer, nothing really changes. The hardware may be
    nominally faster, but the computer manufacturer makes sure that
    extra software bloat is added, to bring the machine to its knees
    again :)

    Paul
    Paul, Nov 1, 2008
    #6
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    "bmoag" <> wrote in message
    news:4wPOk.3500$...
    > You appear to have hosed (as in destroyed) a prior installation of
    > Windows.
    > It is not clear what you mean by "rebuild" as you mention only software.
    > If you do not have the installation disks for programs like Norton then
    > you are out of luck.
    > Well, not really. Norton is a resource hog that can be a nightmare to
    > uninstall and does not work any better than free alternatives like AVG and
    > the XP/Vista firewall. The use of a third party firewalls (Zone Alarm and
    > Kimodo are free and superior to Norton) is completely unnecessary for the
    > vast majority of users and will only slow performance and make peer to
    > peer networking more complex than Microsoft already makes it. So getting
    > rid of Norton is actually a good thing.


    Will either Zone Alarm or Comodo conflict with Avast or Spybot?
    Guest, Nov 3, 2008
    #7
  8. Guest

    ceej Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:67JPk.197221$2...
    >
    > "bmoag" <> wrote in message
    > news:4wPOk.3500$...
    >> You appear to have hosed (as in destroyed) a prior installation of
    >> Windows.
    >> It is not clear what you mean by "rebuild" as you mention only software.
    >> If you do not have the installation disks for programs like Norton then
    >> you are out of luck.
    >> Well, not really. Norton is a resource hog that can be a nightmare to
    >> uninstall and does not work any better than free alternatives like AVG
    >> and the XP/Vista firewall. The use of a third party firewalls (Zone Alarm
    >> and Kimodo are free and superior to Norton) is completely unnecessary for
    >> the vast majority of users and will only slow performance and make peer
    >> to peer networking more complex than Microsoft already makes it. So
    >> getting rid of Norton is actually a good thing.

    >
    > Will either Zone Alarm or Comodo conflict with Avast or Spybot?


    >

    I use Comodo and AVG; also Spybot and others, as necessary; no problems
    side by side at my end.
    ceej, Nov 4, 2008
    #8
  9. Guest

    sandy58 Guest

    On Nov 1, 2:45 pm, <> wrote:
    > "bmoag" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:4wPOk.3500$...
    >
    > > You appear to have hosed (as in destroyed) a prior installation of
    > > Windows.
    > > It is not clear what you mean by "rebuild" as you mention only software..
    > > If you do not have the installation disks for programs like Norton then
    > > you are out of luck.
    > > Well, not really. Norton is a resource hog that can be a nightmare to
    > > uninstall and does not work any better than free alternatives like AVG and
    > > the XP/Vista firewall. The use of a third party firewalls (Zone Alarm and
    > > Kimodo are free and superior to Norton) is completely unnecessary for the
    > > vast majority of users and will only slow performance and make peer to
    > > peer networking more complex than Microsoft already makes it. So getting
    > > rid of Norton is actually a good thing.
    > > Although it is often recommended to reformat your hard drive and reinstall
    > > programs to boost performance this is not good advice for most users who
    > > may not have all their old program installation disks, may not have
    > > properly backed up essential documents and files and will have to battle
    > > with entities like Microsoft and Adobe to get their software reactivated.
    > > You have learned this the hard way, I am afraid.

    >
    > Right, well what we have is two operating systems over one another at the
    > moment, which is leaving very little space on my hard drive. Thus, what I
    > would like to do is back up my relevant files and reinstall from scratch, so
    > that I don't have two operating systems on top of each other.
    >
    > Yes, I have the required installation discs.
    >
    > Or should I simply reset the computer to restart from when it came out of
    > the box?
    >
    > One other question, this time about printers.
    >
    > I have an Epson Stylus C44UX, and I am having problems printing on it. I
    > recently bought cartridges from non-Epson sources, although they are
    > compatible with the printer itself. But the problem is that the printer is
    > not properly printing out documents -- either the ink is very faint or there
    > is severe banding.
    >
    > Any advice on this as well?
    >
    > I realise that the best advice would be to actually spend the money and buy
    > a new computer and printer, because this equipment is starting to get old..
    > But the credit crunch ...


    "One other question, this time about printers." I'd fix the PC first
    as you won't need a printer ....if the PC ain't working. :)
    sandy58, Nov 6, 2008
    #9
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