Re: Wouldn't it be cool if ...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Randall Ainsworth, Jul 31, 2003.

  1. > ... digital SLRs could detect whether a tripod was being used, and write
    > the fact to the EXIF file?


    And this would serve what useful purpose?

    It's like the people who record shutter speed & f/stop settings. What
    do I give a shit? It's not useful unless I was standing next to them
    when they took the shot.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 31, 2003
    #1
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  2. > Why bash somebody for daring to float a new idea? You want your money
    > back?
    > Lighten up!!


    What useful purpose would this information serve? What useful purpose
    does most of the EXIF information serve? What do I care what setting
    you used to take a picture? It does me no good unless I was standing
    next to you when you took it.
    Jeez...quit reading Popular Photography.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 31, 2003
    #2
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  3. Randall Ainsworth wrote:
    >>Why bash somebody for daring to float a new idea? You want your money
    >>back?
    >>Lighten up!!

    >
    >
    > What useful purpose would this information serve? What useful purpose
    > does most of the EXIF information serve? What do I care what setting
    > you used to take a picture? It does me no good unless I was standing
    > next to you when you took it.
    > Jeez...quit reading Popular Photography.


    Calm down already. This is your second rant about EXIF info. I think
    it's absolutely wonderful to have the date and time stamped in the image
    file. I am in the middle of scanning about 10,000 negatives from the
    last 30 years and it sure would be nice to know when some of these were
    taken.

    The exposure info is also convenient if you plan on LEARNING ANYTHING
    from the pictures you have taken.

    If you don't like EXIF info that's fine. But you don't need to attack
    it like it's an evil that should be destroyed. Some of us actually use it.

    I agree that a tripod sensor is a silly idea. The ONLY use I can think
    of is that some cameras in program mode could take advantage of the info
    to use a slower shutter speed, knowing that camera shake was no longer
    an issue. But since I hardly every use program mode when I am using a
    tripod it would not be meaningful to me.
     
    Andrew McDonald, Jul 31, 2003
    #3
  4. Randall Ainsworth

    Browntimdc Guest

    Randall Ainsworth <> wrote in
    news:310720031010300634%:

    >> Why bash somebody for daring to float a new idea? You want your money
    >> back?
    >> Lighten up!!

    >
    > What useful purpose would this information serve? What useful purpose
    > does most of the EXIF information serve? What do I care what setting
    > you used to take a picture? It does me no good unless I was standing
    > next to you when you took it.
    > Jeez...quit reading Popular Photography.
    >


    You totally and utterly miss my point. Not every new or different idea is
    useful or even good. People in you attitude result in these forums being
    75% dogma and boring repetition of the obvious. DOn't discourage free
    thinkers. FDR admittied back during the depression that it was time to
    try new things, if they don't work then move on. You shouldn't insult
    someone because their idea isn't your cup of tea.

    Tim
     
    Browntimdc, Jul 31, 2003
    #4
  5. Randall Ainsworth

    Browntimdc Guest

    Randall Ainsworth <> wrote in
    news:310720031152550783%:

    > I can see the date maybe, but the other information is useless. You
    > look at the info on one of my pictures and see that it was taken at
    > 1/125 @ f/11. So what? You weren't standing next to me when I took
    > it.


    Some film photographers carefully make notes about exposure and shooting
    conditions [I'm too lazy to do that] and refer to their notes as a
    learning aid.

    >
    > This has been a pet peeve of mine for years. You look in the
    > amateur
    > mags and they're full of this useless information.
    >


    You sound like a closed minded old codger.

    Tim
     
    Browntimdc, Jul 31, 2003
    #5
  6. Knowing the ISO speed, aperture and shutter speed, focal length and
    focus setting gives a lot of useful information that can be used if you
    encounter a picture taking situation of a similar nature. This
    information *is* actually useful to a lot of people trying to learn
    about photography.

    Date and time are useful for your archiving purposes, they are of
    secondary value to others unless they are archivists looking for the
    date of a photograph.

    There are some other bits of the EXIF information that might be useful
    if you're debugging a particular camera or whatever, but most is not
    useful to other people.

    Knowing whether you used a tripod might be useful to you, the
    photographer, in assessing whether you need to think more carefully
    about using a tripod more frequently, but I can't see much other use
    for that particular piece of information.

    Godfrey

    In article <310720030753220134%>, Randall
    Ainsworth <> wrote:

    > > ... digital SLRs could detect whether a tripod was being used, and write
    > > the fact to the EXIF file?

    >
    > And this would serve what useful purpose?
    >
    > It's like the people who record shutter speed & f/stop settings. What
    > do I give a shit? It's not useful unless I was standing next to them
    > when they took the shot.
     
    Godfrey DiGiorgi, Jul 31, 2003
    #6
  7. > You sound like a closed minded old codger.

    BINGO!
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 31, 2003
    #7
  8. > I still don't understand why this information is usless unless "you were
    > standing next to me". If I see a great picture of a sunset in a
    > magazine and I know the exposure info it gives me a starting point when
    > I want to try it myself. If I try some pictures and they don't come out
    > (too dark, too light) I have a starting point for the next time.


    I've done photography for long enough that I usually don't need a
    light meter. (It ain't braggin' if you can do it)
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 31, 2003
    #8
  9. Randall Ainsworth

    Alan Browne Guest

    Randall Ainsworth wrote:
    >>... digital SLRs could detect whether a tripod was being used, and write
    >>the fact to the EXIF file?

    >
    >
    > And this would serve what useful purpose?
    >
    > It's like the people who record shutter speed & f/stop settings. What
    > do I give a shit? It's not useful unless I was standing next to them
    > when they took the shot.


    these things are useful when learning photography or testing new films.
    But I'm happy to write them down.

    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Jul 31, 2003
    #9
  10. Randall Ainsworth

    Magus Guest

    Randall Ainsworth <> wrote in
    news:310720031152550783%:


    > This has been a pet peeve of mine for years.


    And dont we know it...

    Its useful to people who have a reason to want to know it.
    Whether they 'stood next to you or not'.

    Accept that not everybody need thinks like you? - which seems like a good
    thing to me.
     
    Magus, Jul 31, 2003
    #10
  11. Randall Ainsworth

    Magus Guest

    Randall Ainsworth <> wrote in
    news:310720031413215519%:

    ..
    >
    > I've done photography for long enough that I usually don't need a
    > light meter. (It ain't braggin' if you can do it)
    >


    Can you go stick your head in a pail too?
    Not to brag, just so that you know you can do it ..
     
    Magus, Jul 31, 2003
    #11
  12. > Its useful to people who have a reason to want to know it.
    > Whether they 'stood next to you or not'.


    OK, I took this shot at 1/30 @ f/8 using a 150mm lens on Hasselblad
    and VPS film. What good does that information do you?

    > Accept that not everybody need thinks like you? - which seems like a good
    > thing to me.


    The world would be a much better place if they did. :)
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 1, 2003
    #12
  13. Randall Ainsworth

    Guest

    Randall Ainsworth <> wrote:

    >> ... digital SLRs could detect whether a tripod was being used, and write
    >> the fact to the EXIF file?


    > And this would serve what useful purpose?


    > It's like the people who record shutter speed & f/stop settings. What
    > do I give a shit? It's not useful unless I was standing next to them
    > when they took the shot.


    what does "I was standing next to them" have anything to do with
    whether the exif information was useful or not?

    I find the exif information to be extremely useful to me. I can find
    out which camera took the picture, what date, what setting, what lens.
    all of which is impossible to write down with my film camera.

    If you like it, use it, if you don't like it, ignore it. It's as
    simple as that. It's like saying, why would I need to know the speed
    of my car? I can tell by looking outside the window.
     
    , Aug 1, 2003
    #13
  14. Randall Ainsworth

    Guest

    Randall Ainsworth <> wrote:

    >> Knowing whether you used a tripod might be useful to you, the
    >> photographer, in assessing whether you need to think more carefully
    >> about using a tripod more frequently, but I can't see much other use
    >> for that particular piece of information.


    > I can tell by looking at an image if I used a tripod or not -
    > consistency of technique.


    in general or only in your own images?
     
    , Aug 1, 2003
    #14
  15. > I thought you were a zone system photographer, Randall. Nobody
    > photographs by the zone system without keeping meticulous notes.


    When shooting B&W film, yes. But I have yet to see how it applies
    well to digital color photography.
    And the only notes I needed with B&W film were how to develop the
    roll - +1, -1, whatever.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 1, 2003
    #15
  16. > what does "I was standing next to them" have anything to do with
    > whether the exif information was useful or not?


    Unless you were standing next to me when I took the picture, knowing
    the shutter speed and f/stop isn't useful.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 1, 2003
    #16
  17. > >> Knowing whether you used a tripod might be useful to you, the
    > >> photographer, in assessing whether you need to think more carefully
    > >> about using a tripod more frequently, but I can't see much other use
    > >> for that particular piece of information.

    >
    > > I can tell by looking at an image if I used a tripod or not -
    > > consistency of technique.

    >
    > in general or only in your own images?


    My own...consistency of technique.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 1, 2003
    #17
  18. > I can walk about with my Mamiya C330 and no meter, but I'm no grouchy
    > old fart about it. It's probably way too far back for you to remember
    > but I'll bet that at one time you had to learn the craft too.


    I'm not a grouchy old fart. But I get tired of the endless moronic
    posts that frequent this group. These people are hung up on hardware.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 1, 2003
    #18
  19. No, you're not going to take your computer with you. But if you look at
    a lot of pictures and see the exposure values, you'll start remembering
    them. On any useful digital camera, there is usually a readout mode
    that will give you the exposure data (and a histogram) as you review
    your images too.

    I tend to be very consistent in my techniques as well. That doesn't
    mean I find the EXIF information useless. It often lets me know why a
    particular exposure was a failure.

    Godfrey

    In article <310720031417008690%>, Randall
    Ainsworth <> wrote:

    > > Knowing the ISO speed, aperture and shutter speed, focal length and
    > > focus setting gives a lot of useful information that can be used if you
    > > encounter a picture taking situation of a similar nature. This
    > > information *is* actually useful to a lot of people trying to learn
    > > about photography.

    >
    > So I'm going to take my computer out with me to look at EXIF info
    > every time I want to create an image? My photography is done
    > consistently - lowest ASA possible (usually 100); shutter speed &
    > f/stop - I can usually guess close by looking at the image; focal
    > length - so what?; focus setting - again consistency in technique.
    >
    > > Knowing whether you used a tripod might be useful to you, the
    > > photographer, in assessing whether you need to think more carefully
    > > about using a tripod more frequently, but I can't see much other use
    > > for that particular piece of information.

    >
    > I can tell by looking at an image if I used a tripod or not -
    > consistency of technique.
     
    Godfrey DiGiorgi, Aug 1, 2003
    #19
  20. Randall Ainsworth

    Paul H. Guest

    "Randall Ainsworth" <> wrote in message
    news:310720031152550783%...
    > > Calm down already. This is your second rant about EXIF info. I think
    > > it's absolutely wonderful to have the date and time stamped in the image
    > > file. I am in the middle of scanning about 10,000 negatives from the
    > > last 30 years and it sure would be nice to know when some of these were
    > > taken.

    >
    > I can see the date maybe, but the other information is useless. You
    > look at the info on one of my pictures and see that it was taken at
    > 1/125 @ f/11. So what? You weren't standing next to me when I took
    > it.
    >
    > This has been a pet peeve of mine for years. You look in the amateur
    > mags and they're full of this useless information.


    A peeve makes a nice enough pet, but if you keep the same one too long it
    will eventually crawl up your ass and make you grumpy.
     
    Paul H., Aug 1, 2003
    #20
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