Re: Working for yourself as a PC tech

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Captain Lon, Apr 13, 2005.

  1. Captain Lon

    Captain Lon Guest

    You are probably going to hear a lot of people say "Find out what others are
    charging, and then charge less than them". I can't disagree more with that
    logic.

    You are worth what you are charging. You know the value of your own work.
    What kind of customers do you want? The kind that have no loyalty to you,
    but just chose you because you are the cheapest guy in town? This kind of
    customer will nickel and dime you to death, and I predict you will not make
    any money using this philosophy. Also, what is stopping someone with more
    money than you from opening up a competing business across the street from
    you, charging less than you, and putting you out of business? Your
    customers will not be loyal to YOU. They are loyal to LOW COST. I don't
    want them, you can have them.

    It is important to understand the market that you are in. It is important
    to understand what others are charging. But then that means that is the
    going rate that your particular market will bear, and therefore you should
    charge the same, or perhaps even more.

    In my area you will find quotes for service all over the place. I have seen
    $35 per hour, to set prices for various things, such as virus removal for
    $60. On the other end of the scale, Best Buy charges $150 for a house call,
    with no promises. Some local shops charge less if the customer drops off
    their machine, say $50 per hour, and if they make a house call, then they
    charge $60.

    Given all of those factors, I decided to charge $34 per half hour, with a
    one hour minimum. I am a mobile service dept, so I am making house calls.
    If I can't repair whatever the problem is during the house call, I take the
    machine back to my shop, which is in my home. I have set up a rather large
    room in my home with an office, repair bench, and parts shelves. I make no
    promises, no free estimates, no set prices for fixing anything. Computers
    are complex machines, and really, no two problems are the same.

    The only time I might give someone a break on the price is if it turns out
    it might be expensive to repair their unit, they don't want to go forward
    with the repairs, then I will give them a break in the repair cost to date,
    as long as they purchase a new machine from me.

    Am I the cheapest when it comes to selling new computers? Not even close.
    It might be fair to say that I may be one of the most expensive. But then I
    have a niche that others don't seem to be interested in filling. Service
    with the sale. I have included with every one of my new computer sales up
    to two hours of in home time, delivering and setting up the new machine,
    installing their software, transferring their data, giving them an education
    in how to use their new machine. I also include a one year in home warranty
    (but no software support).

    All of my customers like this service and are willing to pay for it. Did I
    say EVERYONE liked this service and was willing to pay for it? Of course
    not. I have lost many many sales to emachines, dell, best buy, etc, because
    they were cheaper. That's ok for me. No prob. I do not have to have
    EVERYONE as my customer. I only need a certain number in order to make a
    living. I fill a need. Not every need. Just the needs of some. That is
    my niche.

    You must figure out what your niche will be. It may be a part of town. Or
    a certain type of customer. What services are you going to offer? I
    predict the more diversified your services offered, the less money you will
    make, not the more like most peeps may think. But then again, if you are in
    a small town, there may not be a market big enough for you to specialize.

    I am fairly new to the computer business, but I am not new to business. I
    owned a successful construction business for nearly 20 years, and I repaired
    X-ray equipment before that for 10 years. I also have a business education
    background.

    Have a clear vision for your business, charge what you are worth, and
    advertise, advertise, advertise. Everyday you must service the customer,
    service the customer, service the customer. This is the formula for
    success.

    Or as someone else once said: Early to bed, early to rise, work like hell,
    and advertise!

    Hope that helps.

    --
    Captain Lon

    "Rock stars! Is there anything they don't know?" Homer Simpson


    "news" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In this terrible job market, it is obvious that it's time to work for
    > myself.
    >
    > For those doing basic computer repair, how do you market yourself?
    >
    > How do you set rates?
    >
    > What are your most common service calls?
    >
    > Do you have a "store front" or do you do pickup/delivery/onsite?
    >
    > Any other advice?
    >
    >
    >
     
    Captain Lon, Apr 13, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. There is a service Company will pay $32.00 flat rate for Dell & IBM onsite
    call in 32 miles radius. You have to be an A+ certified and good driving
    record.

    "Captain Lon" <> wrote in message
    news:lvd7e.14894$hB6.2910@trnddc06...
    > You are probably going to hear a lot of people say "Find out what others
    > are charging, and then charge less than them". I can't disagree more with
    > that logic.
    >
    > You are worth what you are charging. You know the value of your own work.
    > What kind of customers do you want? The kind that have no loyalty to you,
    > but just chose you because you are the cheapest guy in town? This kind of
    > customer will nickel and dime you to death, and I predict you will not
    > make any money using this philosophy. Also, what is stopping someone with
    > more money than you from opening up a competing business across the street
    > from you, charging less than you, and putting you out of business? Your
    > customers will not be loyal to YOU. They are loyal to LOW COST. I don't
    > want them, you can have them.
    >
    > It is important to understand the market that you are in. It is important
    > to understand what others are charging. But then that means that is the
    > going rate that your particular market will bear, and therefore you should
    > charge the same, or perhaps even more.
    >
    > In my area you will find quotes for service all over the place. I have
    > seen $35 per hour, to set prices for various things, such as virus removal
    > for $60. On the other end of the scale, Best Buy charges $150 for a house
    > call, with no promises. Some local shops charge less if the customer
    > drops off their machine, say $50 per hour, and if they make a house call,
    > then they charge $60.
    >
    > Given all of those factors, I decided to charge $34 per half hour, with a
    > one hour minimum. I am a mobile service dept, so I am making house calls.
    > If I can't repair whatever the problem is during the house call, I take
    > the machine back to my shop, which is in my home. I have set up a rather
    > large room in my home with an office, repair bench, and parts shelves. I
    > make no promises, no free estimates, no set prices for fixing anything.
    > Computers are complex machines, and really, no two problems are the same.
    >
    > The only time I might give someone a break on the price is if it turns out
    > it might be expensive to repair their unit, they don't want to go forward
    > with the repairs, then I will give them a break in the repair cost to
    > date, as long as they purchase a new machine from me.
    >
    > Am I the cheapest when it comes to selling new computers? Not even close.
    > It might be fair to say that I may be one of the most expensive. But then
    > I have a niche that others don't seem to be interested in filling.
    > Service with the sale. I have included with every one of my new computer
    > sales up to two hours of in home time, delivering and setting up the new
    > machine, installing their software, transferring their data, giving them
    > an education in how to use their new machine. I also include a one year
    > in home warranty (but no software support).
    >
    > All of my customers like this service and are willing to pay for it. Did
    > I say EVERYONE liked this service and was willing to pay for it? Of
    > course not. I have lost many many sales to emachines, dell, best buy,
    > etc, because they were cheaper. That's ok for me. No prob. I do not
    > have to have EVERYONE as my customer. I only need a certain number in
    > order to make a living. I fill a need. Not every need. Just the needs
    > of some. That is my niche.
    >
    > You must figure out what your niche will be. It may be a part of town.
    > Or a certain type of customer. What services are you going to offer? I
    > predict the more diversified your services offered, the less money you
    > will make, not the more like most peeps may think. But then again, if you
    > are in a small town, there may not be a market big enough for you to
    > specialize.
    >
    > I am fairly new to the computer business, but I am not new to business. I
    > owned a successful construction business for nearly 20 years, and I
    > repaired X-ray equipment before that for 10 years. I also have a business
    > education background.
    >
    > Have a clear vision for your business, charge what you are worth, and
    > advertise, advertise, advertise. Everyday you must service the customer,
    > service the customer, service the customer. This is the formula for
    > success.
    >
    > Or as someone else once said: Early to bed, early to rise, work like
    > hell, and advertise!
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    >
    > --
    > Captain Lon
    >
    > "Rock stars! Is there anything they don't know?" Homer Simpson
    >
    >
    > "news" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> In this terrible job market, it is obvious that it's time to work for
    >> myself.
    >>
    >> For those doing basic computer repair, how do you market yourself?
    >>
    >> How do you set rates?
    >>
    >> What are your most common service calls?
    >>
    >> Do you have a "store front" or do you do pickup/delivery/onsite?
    >>
    >> Any other advice?
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Modern cnc Shop, Apr 20, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

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