Re: Words and non-words, according to Microsoft et al

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Steve B, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 10:27:09 +1300, EMB <> wrote:

    >Roger Dewhurst wrote:
    >> Steve B wrote:
    >>> I recently typed "when" with an accidental d on the end, and was
    >>> interested to notice that, according to the Microsoft Word
    >>> spellchecker, though "whend" is not a legitimate word, "when'd" is.
    >>>
    >>> I assume this is as in: "When'd [when had] he said that?" I'm fairly
    >>> confident in saying that I have never seen that word in print.
    >>>
    >>> OTOH, "tarting" ("starting" mistyped) is not a legitimate word
    >>> according to MS (I have now added it to the dictionary). Perhaps I
    >>> should have checked that I hadn't accidentally been flipped back to
    >>> the US dictionary, since it ought to be in the NZ English one. Can
    >>> someone check?
    >>>
    >>>

    >> How do you set the required dictionary in XP?

    >
    >You don't - the dictionary isn't a part of XP. You set in in the
    >application that installed it.


    I have a small caption reading EN that sits on the taskbar between the
    icons for programs I consciously started up and the infuriating
    horizontal fold-out menu with the loudspeaker volume icon,
    virus-stopper and other automatically-started applications on it.
    Mouse over the EN and it tells you what dictionary you have. Right
    click on it, then left-click "settings" on the popup menu.

    You get a popup console headed "Text Services and Input languages" and
    the slot at the top (with arrow at right) tells you what language you
    are set to. If you change is, remember to click "Apply" before you
    send it away with "OK".

    But as always with this kind of thing, YMMV - your microcomputer may
    vary.

    Hope this helps

    My question: how do you take words OUT of the dictionary, and is it
    possible to remove words that were in there to begin with?

    Ususally when I type "fro" it's a mistype for "for" or "from". I
    seldom type it intentionally and when I do, I know that's what I mean;
    so I'd like to remove it from the MS Word dictionary, so I get a red
    underline.

    Can I do this?

    Steve B

    nz.comp added, as the discussion has now become a little more
    "technical"
     
    Steve B, Mar 20, 2008
    #1
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  2. Steve B wrote:
    > On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 10:27:09 +1300, EMB <> wrote:
    >


    >
    > I have a small caption reading EN that sits on the taskbar between the
    > icons for programs I consciously started up and the infuriating
    > horizontal fold-out menu with the loudspeaker volume icon,
    > virus-stopper and other automatically-started applications on it.
    > Mouse over the EN and it tells you what dictionary you have. Right
    > click on it, then left-click "settings" on the popup menu.
    >
    > You get a popup console headed "Text Services and Input languages" and
    > the slot at the top (with arrow at right) tells you what language you
    > are set to. If you change is, remember to click "Apply" before you
    > send it away with "OK".
    >

    I do not have that button on my taskbar.

    R
     
    Roger Dewhurst, Mar 20, 2008
    #2
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  3. Steve B

    impossible Guest

    "Steve B" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >
    > My question: how do you take words OUT of the dictionary, and is it
    > possible to remove words that were in there to begin with?
    >
    > Ususally when I type "fro" it's a mistype for "for" or "from". I
    > seldom type it intentionally and when I do, I know that's what I mean;
    > so I'd like to remove it from the MS Word dictionary, so I get a red
    > underline.
    >
    > Can I do this?
    >


    Not exactly. But if you want, you can always **add** a word to the
    dictionary (technically, you're adding a word to your user-assigned Ciustom
    Dictionary), and that will basically accomplish what you want. It's an
    option that's available any time the Spell Checker is run. For example, with
    the word "fro" -- as in "to and fro", I assume -- adding this to the
    dictionary tells Word not to flag it anymore (in my version, Word 2007,
    "fro" is already in the dictionary, but maybe earlier versions were more
    restrictive). Of course, if you do that, Word will thereafter treat all
    instances of "fro" that it sees ("fro the heck of it") as being legtimate,
    and you won't be automatically prompted to correct them. But I gather
    that's a lesser evil for you. Alternatively, you can create custom
    "AutoCorrect entries to handle a variety of spelling errors like this that
    may be phrase-specific. Word would then correct "fro the heck of it" but not
    "to an fro". Check your Help file under "AutoCorrect" for additional
    information, because the procedure varies somewhat from version to version.
     
    impossible, Mar 21, 2008
    #3
  4. On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 12:06:33 +1300, Steve B wrote:

    > Ususally when I type "fro" it's a mistype for "for" or "from". I seldom
    > type it intentionally and when I do, I know that's what I mean; so I'd
    > like to remove it from the MS Word dictionary, so I get a red underline.
    >
    > Can I do this?


    "Fro" is a standard English word.

    I would expect it to be in every dictionary ever released.


    --
    Smoking Causes Lung Cancer

    Franklin D Roosevelt: "We have always known that heedless self-interest
    was bad morals; we know now that it is bad economics."
     
    Smoking Causes Lung Cancer (SCLC), Mar 21, 2008
    #4
  5. On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 02:07:25 +0000, impossible wrote:

    > because the procedure varies somewhat from version to version.


    And that is another insanity that is common to all iterations of M$
    software.


    --
    Smoking Causes Lung Cancer

    Franklin D Roosevelt: "We have always known that heedless self-interest
    was bad morals; we know now that it is bad economics."
     
    Smoking Causes Lung Cancer (SCLC), Mar 21, 2008
    #5
  6. Steve B

    impossible Guest

    "Smoking Causes Lung Cancer (SCLC)" <> wrote in message
    news:p...

    "impossible" <> wrote in message
    news:xLEEj.31663$TT4.9924@attbi_s22...
    >>
    >> "Steve B" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>>
    >>> My question: how do you take words OUT of the dictionary, and is it
    >>> possible to remove words that were in there to begin with?
    >>>
    >>> Ususally when I type "fro" it's a mistype for "for" or "from". I
    >>> seldom type it intentionally and when I do, I know that's what I mean;
    >>> so I'd like to remove it from the MS Word dictionary, so I get a red
    >>> underline.
    >>>
    >>> Can I do this?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Not exactly. But if you want, you can always **add** a word to the
    >> dictionary (technically, you're adding a word to your user-assigned
    >> Ciustom
    >> Dictionary), and that will basically accomplish what you want. It's an
    >> option that's available any time the Spell Checker is run. For example,
    >> with
    >> the word "fro" -- as in "to and fro", I assume -- adding this to the
    >> dictionary tells Word not to flag it anymore (in my version, Word 2007,
    >> "fro" is already in the dictionary, but maybe earlier versions were more
    >> restrictive). Of course, if you do that, Word will thereafter treat all
    >> instances of "fro" that it sees ("fro the heck of it") as being
    >> legtimate,
    >> and you won't be automatically prompted to correct them. But I gather
    >> that's a lesser evil for you. Alternatively, you can create custom
    >> "AutoCorrect entries to handle a variety of spelling errors like this
    >> that
    >> may be phrase-specific. Word would then correct "fro the heck of it" but
    >> not
    >> "to an fro". Check your Help file under "AutoCorrect" for additional
    >> information, because the procedure varies somewhat from version to
    >> version.
    >>
    >>> And that is another insanity that is common to all iterations of M$

    > software.
    >


    I know, all that power and flexibility is just too much for you to handle --
    when you type letters to your mum, all you need is 12 alphabetic keys, a
    comma maybe, and the odd full stop. Really, I'd stay away from Word if I
    were you.
     
    impossible, Mar 21, 2008
    #6
  7. Steve B

    Rich80105 Guest

    On 21 Mar 2008 16:19:19 +1300, "Smoking Causes Lung Cancer (SCLC)"
    <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 12:06:33 +1300, Steve B wrote:
    >
    >> Ususally when I type "fro" it's a mistype for "for" or "from". I seldom
    >> type it intentionally and when I do, I know that's what I mean; so I'd
    >> like to remove it from the MS Word dictionary, so I get a red underline.
    >>
    >> Can I do this?

    >
    >"Fro" is a standard English word.


    As is 'froward'

    >I would expect it to be in every dictionary ever released.


    But that may be wishful thinking . . .
     
    Rich80105, Mar 21, 2008
    #7
  8. Steve B

    Matty F Guest

    On Mar 21, 2:07 pm, "impossible" <> wrote:
    > "Steve B" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > > My question: how do you take words OUT of the dictionary, and is it
    > > possible to remove words that were in there to begin with?

    >
    > > Ususally when I type "fro" it's a mistype for "for" or "from". I
    > > seldom type it intentionally and when I do, I know that's what I mean;
    > > so I'd like to remove it from the MS Word dictionary, so I get a red
    > > underline.

    >
    > > Can I do this?

    >
    > Not exactly. But if you want, you can always **add** a word to the
    > dictionary (technically, you're adding a word to your user-assigned Ciustom
    > Dictionary), and that will basically accomplish what you want.


    How can that possibly help? The OP wants to *remove* "fro" so that it
    is flagged as an error whenever it's typed.

    One way of removing a word would be to search the dictionary file for
    the word and change it to something else that is valid. If you don't
    know where the dictionary file is, add a new word then search for the
    latest file changed.
     
    Matty F, Mar 21, 2008
    #8
  9. Steve B

    impossible Guest

    "Matty F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mar 21, 2:07 pm, "impossible" <> wrote:
    >> "Steve B" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > My question: how do you take words OUT of the dictionary, and is it
    >> > possible to remove words that were in there to begin with?

    >>
    >> > Ususally when I type "fro" it's a mistype for "for" or "from". I
    >> > seldom type it intentionally and when I do, I know that's what I mean;
    >> > so I'd like to remove it from the MS Word dictionary, so I get a red
    >> > underline.

    >>
    >> > Can I do this?

    >>
    >> Not exactly. But if you want, you can always **add** a word to the
    >> dictionary (technically, you're adding a word to your user-assigned
    >> Ciustom
    >> Dictionary), and that will basically accomplish what you want.

    >
    > How can that possibly help? The OP wants to *remove* "fro" so that it
    > is flagged as an error whenever it's typed.
    >


    Ok, yes, I misread the OP's intention.


    > One way of removing a word would be to search the dictionary file for
    > the word and change it to something else that is valid. If you don't
    > know where the dictionary file is, add a new word then search for the
    > latest file changed.


    The file in question is "custom.dic". It can be found at "

    ....Documents and Settings\[user]\Application Data\Microsoft\Proof

    This is the user-specific dictionary that includes words that have been
    previuously added. Open that file in a text editor and delete "fro". Done.
     
    impossible, Mar 21, 2008
    #9
  10. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 12:45:45 +1300, Roger Dewhurst
    <> wrote:

    >Steve B wrote:
    >> On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 10:27:09 +1300, EMB <> wrote:
    >>

    >
    >>
    >> I have a small caption reading EN that sits on the taskbar between the
    >> icons for programs I consciously started up and the infuriating
    >> horizontal fold-out menu with the loudspeaker volume icon,
    >> virus-stopper and other automatically-started applications on it.
    >> Mouse over the EN and it tells you what dictionary you have. Right
    >> click on it, then left-click "settings" on the popup menu.
    >>
    >> You get a popup console headed "Text Services and Input languages" and
    >> the slot at the top (with arrow at right) tells you what language you
    >> are set to. If you change is, remember to click "Apply" before you
    >> send it away with "OK".
    >>

    >I do not have that button on my taskbar.
    >
    >R


    Try "Tools" (down to) "Language" (across to) "Set Language"; choose
    your language from the menu then click the "Default" button.

    Steve B.
     
    Steve B, Mar 21, 2008
    #10
  11. Steve B

    Jason Rumney Guest

    On 20 Mar, 23:06, Steve B <> wrote:

    > I have a small caption reading EN that sits on the taskbar between the
    > icons for programs I consciously started up and the infuriating
    > horizontal fold-out menu with the loudspeaker volume icon,
    > virus-stopper and other automatically-started applications on it.
    > Mouse over the EN and it tells you what dictionary you have.


    That icon is telling you what keyboard layout you have. If the
    application uses system settings to figure out which dictionary to
    use, it will either use the language specified under "Standards and
    Formats" of the "Regional Options" tab of the "Regional and Language
    Options" control panel, or the misnamed "Language for non-Unicode
    programs" on the "Advanced" tab. These settings correspond to the
    "User Locale" and "System Locale" respectively on older versions of
    Windows that didn't try to be so confusingly user friendly with their
    naming of the settings.
     
    Jason Rumney, Mar 21, 2008
    #11
  12. Steve B

    sam Guest

    Steve B wrote:
    > On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 10:27:09 +1300, EMB <> wrote:
    >
    >> Roger Dewhurst wrote:
    >>> Steve B wrote:
    >>>> I recently typed "when" with an accidental d on the end, and was
    >>>> interested to notice that, according to the Microsoft Word
    >>>> spellchecker, though "whend" is not a legitimate word, "when'd" is.
    >>>>
    >>>> I assume this is as in: "When'd [when had] he said that?" I'm fairly
    >>>> confident in saying that I have never seen that word in print.
    >>>>
    >>>> OTOH, "tarting" ("starting" mistyped) is not a legitimate word
    >>>> according to MS (I have now added it to the dictionary). Perhaps I
    >>>> should have checked that I hadn't accidentally been flipped back to
    >>>> the US dictionary, since it ought to be in the NZ English one. Can
    >>>> someone check?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> How do you set the required dictionary in XP?

    >> You don't - the dictionary isn't a part of XP. You set in in the
    >> application that installed it.

    >
    > I have a small caption reading EN that sits on the taskbar between the
    > icons for programs I consciously started up and the infuriating
    > horizontal fold-out menu with the loudspeaker volume icon,
    > virus-stopper and other automatically-started applications on it.
    > Mouse over the EN and it tells you what dictionary you have. Right
    > click on it, then left-click "settings" on the popup menu.
    >
    > You get a popup console headed "Text Services and Input languages" and
    > the slot at the top (with arrow at right) tells you what language you
    > are set to. If you change is, remember to click "Apply" before you
    > send it away with "OK".
    >
    > But as always with this kind of thing, YMMV - your microcomputer may
    > vary.
    >
    > Hope this helps
    >
    > My question: how do you take words OUT of the dictionary, and is it
    > possible to remove words that were in there to begin with?
    >
    > Ususally when I type "fro" it's a mistype for "for" or "from". I
    > seldom type it intentionally and when I do, I know that's what I mean;
    > so I'd like to remove it from the MS Word dictionary, so I get a red
    > underline.
    >
    > Can I do this?
    >
    > Steve B
    >
    > nz.comp added, as the discussion has now become a little more
    > "technical"


    Yes, you create an "exclude dictionary".
    Type that into your word processing programs help, or search on the
    Microsoft knowledge base fot the instructions.
     
    sam, Mar 21, 2008
    #12
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