Re: Windows 7

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Kerry Brown, Jul 25, 2009.

  1. Kerry Brown

    Kerry Brown Guest

    Improved aero peek, jump lists, and pinned items on the task bar are my
    faves. In general the UI is smoother. Many things have been optimized to
    give a better (faster) user experience. If you're happy with Vista you'll
    love Windows 7. If you have ignored Vista you'll have an even steeper
    learning curve with Windows 7.

    Things I don't like:

    Homegroup - it's a step backwards for security.

    Things that may be awesome in the next version of Windows:

    Libraries - cool idea, not implemented very well. It can cause a lot of
    frustration and can't be turned off.

    --
    Kerry Brown
    MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/


    "Steve Johnson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi
    >
    > I'm new to Windows 7. What do you think about the new features? Which one
    > you like the most?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Steve Johnson
     
    Kerry Brown, Jul 25, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Please expound as to why you think Homegroup is a step backwards for
    security. The default password is randomly generated 10 characters of
    mixed case which is a pretty secure password. And, it only works in a
    home network environment. If you join a domain, the Homegroup is disabled.

    I don't see the security hazard.



    Kerry Brown wrote:
    > Improved aero peek, jump lists, and pinned items on the task bar are my
    > faves. In general the UI is smoother. Many things have been optimized to
    > give a better (faster) user experience. If you're happy with Vista
    > you'll love Windows 7. If you have ignored Vista you'll have an even
    > steeper learning curve with Windows 7.
    >
    > Things I don't like:
    >
    > Homegroup - it's a step backwards for security.
    >
    > Things that may be awesome in the next version of Windows:
    >
    > Libraries - cool idea, not implemented very well. It can cause a lot of
    > frustration and can't be turned off.
    >
     
    Bobby Johnson, Jul 25, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Kerry Brown

    TMA Guest

    Libraries work fine with me. Not a problem at all.
    I have a big HD and it makes things a lot easier to browse for my files, and
    besides, it works like a charm.

    "Kerry Brown" <*a*m> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Improved aero peek, jump lists, and pinned items on the task bar are my
    > faves. In general the UI is smoother. Many things have been optimized to
    > give a better (faster) user experience. If you're happy with Vista you'll
    > love Windows 7. If you have ignored Vista you'll have an even steeper
    > learning curve with Windows 7.
    >
    > Things I don't like:
    >
    > Homegroup - it's a step backwards for security.
    >
    > Things that may be awesome in the next version of Windows:
    >
    > Libraries - cool idea, not implemented very well. It can cause a lot of
    > frustration and can't be turned off.
    >
    > --
    > Kerry Brown
    > MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    > http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/
    >
    >
    > "Steve Johnson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi
    >>
    >> I'm new to Windows 7. What do you think about the new features? Which one
    >> you like the most?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Steve Johnson

    >
     
    TMA, Jul 25, 2009
    #3
  4. Kerry Brown

    Kerry Brown Guest

    The problem actually occurs in Vista as well. I only found out about it when
    testing Homegroups. If you share a folder in your profile, which Homegroups
    does automatically, the whole \User branch is shared including other
    profiles. I have talked to someone at Microsoft about this. Their position
    is that the default ACLs and Access Based Enumeration is good enough. I say
    it isn't. Many small businesses use home versions of Windows. I can easily
    see this causing the inadvertent sharing of accounting, payroll, or other
    confidential files. Many small businesses have very lax security which in
    this case is exacerbated by folders being shared without their knowledge.
    It's hard to mitigate a risk if you don't know the risk exists. I would much
    rather see specific folders shared rather than the whole \User branch.

    --
    Kerry Brown
    MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/




    "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Please expound as to why you think Homegroup is a step backwards for
    > security. The default password is randomly generated 10 characters of
    > mixed case which is a pretty secure password. And, it only works in a
    > home network environment. If you join a domain, the Homegroup is
    > disabled.
    >
    > I don't see the security hazard.
    >
    >
    >
    > Kerry Brown wrote:
    >> Improved aero peek, jump lists, and pinned items on the task bar are my
    >> faves. In general the UI is smoother. Many things have been optimized to
    >> give a better (faster) user experience. If you're happy with Vista you'll
    >> love Windows 7. If you have ignored Vista you'll have an even steeper
    >> learning curve with Windows 7.
    >>
    >> Things I don't like:
    >>
    >> Homegroup - it's a step backwards for security.
    >>
    >> Things that may be awesome in the next version of Windows:
    >>
    >> Libraries - cool idea, not implemented very well. It can cause a lot of
    >> frustration and can't be turned off.
    >>
     
    Kerry Brown, Jul 25, 2009
    #4
  5. Kerry Brown

    Kerry Brown Guest

    As implemented there are problems with network shares and it's not flexible
    enough.

    I'd like to be able to delete the default libraries then create my own.
    Right now in my Documents library I have 409 files in "Text Document". In
    there are nine documents called "admin_activate.txt". This is because I have
    several web sites that use this file stored in several folders in My
    Documents with backup copies stored in several folders in My Documents on
    another computer which are also in my library. If I want to open the file
    which one is the current one? It's not immediately obvious. I have folders
    in the Documents library labeled "Microsoft Office Word 97-2003" and
    "Microsoft Office Word". I guess I'm just supposed to remember which version
    of Word I created a file with :) All of this would go away if I had more
    choices of what I want to store in the Documents library and how I want it
    organised.

    It's also confusing as to where files are actually being saved. On a network
    you may want certain files saved on a server that is backed up every day and
    other files on the local computer. You may want confidential files in
    special folders. It's not always obvious exactly where files are being
    saved.

    I really like the idea of libraries. If it's developed more in the next few
    versions of Windows it may move us away from drive letters altogether. That
    would be a very good thing. I like the idea of one big storage pool with the
    actual details of where a particular file is stored obfuscated. You do need
    a method however of marking a file as confidential, can be shared, can be
    shared with these specific people, or needs to be backed up, etc. The
    underlying infrastructure should then look after the details of making sure
    it's stored in the right place with the right permissions. That and more
    flexibility are the missing parts. Right now with two different paradigms
    trying to organise the files it can turn into a big mess.

    --
    Kerry Brown
    MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/


    "TMA" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Libraries work fine with me. Not a problem at all.
    > I have a big HD and it makes things a lot easier to browse for my files,
    > and besides, it works like a charm.
    >
    > "Kerry Brown" <*a*m> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Improved aero peek, jump lists, and pinned items on the task bar are my
    >> faves. In general the UI is smoother. Many things have been optimized to
    >> give a better (faster) user experience. If you're happy with Vista you'll
    >> love Windows 7. If you have ignored Vista you'll have an even steeper
    >> learning curve with Windows 7.
    >>
    >> Things I don't like:
    >>
    >> Homegroup - it's a step backwards for security.
    >>
    >> Things that may be awesome in the next version of Windows:
    >>
    >> Libraries - cool idea, not implemented very well. It can cause a lot of
    >> frustration and can't be turned off.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Kerry Brown
    >> MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    >> http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/
    >>
    >>
    >> "Steve Johnson" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi
    >>>
    >>> I'm new to Windows 7. What do you think about the new features? Which
    >>> one you like the most?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> Steve Johnson

    >>
     
    Kerry Brown, Jul 25, 2009
    #5
  6. Kerry Brown

    tsperling Guest

    I am actually of two minds myself about much of what you are saying. For now
    I've solved this by not setting up any Homegroup, and when the OS wants to
    direct something into the Libraries, I have kept my own time honored method
    of storage that I am sticking to for now. I am not aggressively opposing
    these features, it's just that I realize I may need time to adjust, and if I
    don't - then I will have learnt to ignore it all in a short time.

    I was wondering, though, if your hopes for the future in the paragraph
    below, isn't filled by the 'Skydrive' concept in Windows Live? And whether
    any unwillingness from others to accept your doubts, might not be in view of
    them knowing it will all be going onto the 'web' soon?


    Tony. . .



    "Kerry Brown" <*a*m> wrote in message
    news:O$dkK#...
    > As implemented there are problems with network shares and it's not
    > flexible enough.
    >
    >
    > I really like the idea of libraries. If it's developed more in the next
    > few versions of Windows it may move us away from drive letters altogether.
    > That would be a very good thing. I like the idea of one big storage pool
    > with the actual details of where a particular file is stored obfuscated.
    > You do need a method however of marking a file as confidential, can be
    > shared, can be shared with these specific people, or needs to be backed
    > up, etc. The underlying infrastructure should then look after the details
    > of making sure it's stored in the right place with the right permissions.
    > That and more flexibility are the missing parts. Right now with two
    > different paradigms trying to organise the files it can turn into a big
    > mess.
    >
    > --
    > Kerry Brown
    > MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    > http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/
    >
     
    tsperling, Jul 25, 2009
    #6
  7. Kerry Brown

    Kerry Brown Guest

    Yes, eventually the cloud could be part of your library. That's the beauty
    of the library paradigm. Files can be anywhere the library can talk to.
    You'd still need a way to mark/organise files similar to how we use drives,
    folders, and permissions now.

    --
    Kerry Brown
    MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/


    "tsperling" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am actually of two minds myself about much of what you are saying. For
    > now I've solved this by not setting up any Homegroup, and when the OS
    > wants to direct something into the Libraries, I have kept my own time
    > honored method of storage that I am sticking to for now. I am not
    > aggressively opposing these features, it's just that I realize I may need
    > time to adjust, and if I don't - then I will have learnt to ignore it all
    > in a short time.
    >
    > I was wondering, though, if your hopes for the future in the paragraph
    > below, isn't filled by the 'Skydrive' concept in Windows Live? And whether
    > any unwillingness from others to accept your doubts, might not be in view
    > of them knowing it will all be going onto the 'web' soon?
    >
    >
    > Tony. . .
    >
    >
    >
    > "Kerry Brown" <*a*m> wrote in message
    > news:O$dkK#...
    >> As implemented there are problems with network shares and it's not
    >> flexible enough.
    >>
    >>
    >> I really like the idea of libraries. If it's developed more in the next
    >> few versions of Windows it may move us away from drive letters
    >> altogether. That would be a very good thing. I like the idea of one big
    >> storage pool with the actual details of where a particular file is stored
    >> obfuscated. You do need a method however of marking a file as
    >> confidential, can be shared, can be shared with these specific people, or
    >> needs to be backed up, etc. The underlying infrastructure should then
    >> look after the details of making sure it's stored in the right place with
    >> the right permissions. That and more flexibility are the missing parts.
    >> Right now with two different paradigms trying to organise the files it
    >> can turn into a big mess.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Kerry Brown
    >> MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    >> http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Kerry Brown, Jul 26, 2009
    #7
  8. Kerry Brown

    tsperling Guest

    Quite!

    What I was really driving at, though, was that perhaps the 'skydrive' is
    considerably more flexible than what you give the 'libraries' credit for?

    I have not scrutinized the subject yet, but apparently you can set distinct
    permissions that would make it handy if you can keep the hierarchy in clear
    mental view.

    It sounds luring, if I get the hang on this I may have bought my last HD -
    and my machine will be a diskless workstation, more or less?

    (good grief!)


    Tony. . .



    "Kerry Brown" <*a*m> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Yes, eventually the cloud could be part of your library. That's the beauty
    > of the library paradigm. Files can be anywhere the library can talk to.
    > You'd still need a way to mark/organise files similar to how we use
    > drives, folders, and permissions now.
    >
    > --
    > Kerry Brown
    > MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    > http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/
    >
    >
    > "tsperling" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I am actually of two minds myself about much of what you are saying. For
    >> now I've solved this by not setting up any Homegroup, and when the OS
    >> wants to direct something into the Libraries, I have kept my own time
    >> honored method of storage that I am sticking to for now. I am not
    >> aggressively opposing these features, it's just that I realize I may
    >> need time to adjust, and if I don't - then I will have learnt to ignore
    >> it all in a short time.
    >>
    >> I was wondering, though, if your hopes for the future in the paragraph
    >> below, isn't filled by the 'Skydrive' concept in Windows Live? And
    >> whether any unwillingness from others to accept your doubts, might not be
    >> in view of them knowing it will all be going onto the 'web' soon?
    >>
    >>
    >> Tony. . .
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Kerry Brown" <*a*m> wrote in message
    >> news:O$dkK#...
    >>> As implemented there are problems with network shares and it's not
    >>> flexible enough.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I really like the idea of libraries. If it's developed more in the next
    >>> few versions of Windows it may move us away from drive letters
    >>> altogether. That would be a very good thing. I like the idea of one big
    >>> storage pool with the actual details of where a particular file is
    >>> stored obfuscated. You do need a method however of marking a file as
    >>> confidential, can be shared, can be shared with these specific people,
    >>> or needs to be backed up, etc. The underlying infrastructure should then
    >>> look after the details of making sure it's stored in the right place
    >>> with the right permissions. That and more flexibility are the missing
    >>> parts. Right now with two different paradigms trying to organise the
    >>> files it can turn into a big mess.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Kerry Brown
    >>> MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    >>> http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/
    >>>

    >>
    >>
     
    tsperling, Jul 26, 2009
    #8
  9. Kerry Brown

    Barb Bowman Guest

    I'm with you on this one, but I think that for the average casual
    user, the whole homegroup/library model will work pretty well. (Time
    will tell). I also think that for business/small business users that
    this is not the right solution but it will be uphill sledding to
    convince them of that..

    On Sat, 25 Jul 2009 14:33:23 -0700, "Kerry Brown"
    <*a*m> wrote:

    >It's also confusing as to where files are actually being saved. On a network
    >you may want certain files saved on a server that is backed up every day and
    >other files on the local computer. You may want confidential files in
    >special folders. It's not always obvious exactly where files are being
    >saved.

    Barb Bowman
    MS-MVP
    http://www.digitalmediaphile.com
    http://digitalmediaphile.wordpress.com
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
     
    Barb Bowman, Jul 26, 2009
    #9
  10. Kerry Brown

    Kue2 Guest

    Kerry
    I agree with you, homegroup is a terrible setup.

    "Kerry Brown" <*a*m> wrote in message
    news:#...
    > The problem actually occurs in Vista as well. I only found out about it
    > when testing Homegroups. If you share a folder in your profile, which
    > Homegroups does automatically, the whole \User branch is shared including
    > other profiles. I have talked to someone at Microsoft about this. Their
    > position is that the default ACLs and Access Based Enumeration is good
    > enough. I say it isn't. Many small businesses use home versions of
    > Windows. I can easily see this causing the inadvertent sharing of
    > accounting, payroll, or other confidential files. Many small businesses
    > have very lax security which in this case is exacerbated by folders being
    > shared without their knowledge. It's hard to mitigate a risk if you don't
    > know the risk exists. I would much rather see specific folders shared
    > rather than the whole \User branch.
    >
    > --
    > Kerry Brown
    > MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    > http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Please expound as to why you think Homegroup is a step backwards for
    >> security. The default password is randomly generated 10 characters of
    >> mixed case which is a pretty secure password. And, it only works in a
    >> home network environment. If you join a domain, the Homegroup is
    >> disabled.
    >>
    >> I don't see the security hazard.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Kerry Brown wrote:
    >>> Improved aero peek, jump lists, and pinned items on the task bar are my
    >>> faves. In general the UI is smoother. Many things have been optimized to
    >>> give a better (faster) user experience. If you're happy with Vista
    >>> you'll love Windows 7. If you have ignored Vista you'll have an even
    >>> steeper learning curve with Windows 7.
    >>>
    >>> Things I don't like:
    >>>
    >>> Homegroup - it's a step backwards for security.
    >>>
    >>> Things that may be awesome in the next version of Windows:
    >>>
    >>> Libraries - cool idea, not implemented very well. It can cause a lot of
    >>> frustration and can't be turned off.
    >>>
     
    Kue2, Jul 26, 2009
    #10
  11. Kerry Brown

    Rob Moir Guest

    "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Kerry
    > I agree with you, homegroup is a terrible setup.


    Homegroup is a missed opportunity as well. It would be great to have built
    something that worked with <at least> all currently supported versions of
    Windows, if not something that worked with Mac OSX and maybe even Linux too.
    Not everyone has identical computers at home.
     
    Rob Moir, Aug 2, 2009
    #11
  12. Kerry Brown

    Rob Moir Guest

    "tsperling" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am actually of two minds myself about much of what you are saying. For
    > now I've solved this by not setting up any Homegroup, and when the OS
    > wants to direct something into the Libraries, I have kept my own time
    > honored method of storage that I am sticking to for now. I am not
    > aggressively opposing these features, it's just that I realize I may need
    > time to adjust, and if I don't - then I will have learnt to ignore it all
    > in a short time.
    >
    > I was wondering, though, if your hopes for the future in the paragraph
    > below, isn't filled by the 'Skydrive' concept in Windows Live? And whether
    > any unwillingness from others to accept your doubts, might not be in view
    > of them knowing it will all be going onto the 'web' soon?


    Ah yes, cloud storage. A great way of making sure my documents are
    completely unavailable to me if some idiot I've never met in another country
    trips over the power lead in a data centre I don't even want my documents
    stored in anyway because I'm in the EU and our data protection laws make the
    transfer of business data outside the EU problematic.

    "Solutions" like that I can do without. Live Mesh is a great way of sharing
    desktop wallpapers with a few friends but that's about as far as it goes for
    me.
     
    Rob Moir, Aug 2, 2009
    #12
  13. Kerry Brown

    Zootal Guest

    I ignored Vista, and if I can't get Windows 7 UI to work like XP does, I
    might ignore it also.

    Having said that, I haven't seen an answer yet - is it possible to get Win7
    UI, specifically start menu and task bar, to function like it does in XP
    when in classic mode? I'll learn the new UI when and if I have the time and
    desire - for now, I need it to be what I'm used to because I don't have the
    time to learn how Microsoft thinks I should be using my computer.


    "Kerry Brown" <*a*m> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Improved aero peek, jump lists, and pinned items on the task bar are my
    > faves. In general the UI is smoother. Many things have been optimized to
    > give a better (faster) user experience. If you're happy with Vista you'll
    > love Windows 7. If you have ignored Vista you'll have an even steeper
    > learning curve with Windows 7.
    >
    > Things I don't like:
    >
    > Homegroup - it's a step backwards for security.
    >
    > Things that may be awesome in the next version of Windows:
    >
    > Libraries - cool idea, not implemented very well. It can cause a lot of
    > frustration and can't be turned off.
    >
    > --
    > Kerry Brown
    > MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    > http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/
    >
    >
    > "Steve Johnson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi
    >>
    >> I'm new to Windows 7. What do you think about the new features? Which one
    >> you like the most?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Steve Johnson

    >
     
    Zootal, Aug 26, 2009
    #13
  14. Well, from everything I have read it is not something can be easily
    done. So, if you don't like the Win 7 UI you may as well forget it.

    Personally I didn't find it that difficult to figure it out. It doesn't
    take a Rocket Scientist to figure out how to use it. The Start Menu is
    relatively intuitive and I think the Task Bar is a vast improvement over
    XP and Vista. I just don't see where there's that much to learn!

    I guess some people will even complain about egg in their beer.

    Zootal wrote:
    > I ignored Vista, and if I can't get Windows 7 UI to work like XP does, I
    > might ignore it also.
    >
    > Having said that, I haven't seen an answer yet - is it possible to get Win7
    > UI, specifically start menu and task bar, to function like it does in XP
    > when in classic mode? I'll learn the new UI when and if I have the time and
    > desire - for now, I need it to be what I'm used to because I don't have the
    > time to learn how Microsoft thinks I should be using my computer.
    >
    >
    > "Kerry Brown" <*a*m> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Improved aero peek, jump lists, and pinned items on the task bar are my
    >> faves. In general the UI is smoother. Many things have been optimized to
    >> give a better (faster) user experience. If you're happy with Vista you'll
    >> love Windows 7. If you have ignored Vista you'll have an even steeper
    >> learning curve with Windows 7.
    >>
    >> Things I don't like:
    >>
    >> Homegroup - it's a step backwards for security.
    >>
    >> Things that may be awesome in the next version of Windows:
    >>
    >> Libraries - cool idea, not implemented very well. It can cause a lot of
    >> frustration and can't be turned off.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Kerry Brown
    >> MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    >> http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/
    >>
    >>
    >> "Steve Johnson" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi
    >>>
    >>> I'm new to Windows 7. What do you think about the new features? Which one
    >>> you like the most?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> Steve Johnson

    >
    >
     
    Bobby Johnson, Aug 26, 2009
    #14
  15. Kerry Brown

    Zootal Guest

    Yes, I'm sure it's easy to figure out, and if I spent time doing that
    instead of wasting my time with these newsgroups and typing these messages
    maybe I'd be using it productively right now as I speak. And if someone put
    egg in my beer, I'd complain long and loud :) <egg in beer? ewww! *shudder*
    >


    I may have to put Windows 7 on the back burner until I have time and desire
    to deal with it. XP works, and I don't really have the time or any
    compelling reasons to upgrade right now.

    "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Well, from everything I have read it is not something can be easily done.
    > So, if you don't like the Win 7 UI you may as well forget it.
    >
    > Personally I didn't find it that difficult to figure it out. It doesn't
    > take a Rocket Scientist to figure out how to use it. The Start Menu is
    > relatively intuitive and I think the Task Bar is a vast improvement over
    > XP and Vista. I just don't see where there's that much to learn!
    >
    > I guess some people will even complain about egg in their beer.
    >
    > Zootal wrote:
    >> I ignored Vista, and if I can't get Windows 7 UI to work like XP does, I
    >> might ignore it also.
    >>
    >> Having said that, I haven't seen an answer yet - is it possible to get
    >> Win7 UI, specifically start menu and task bar, to function like it does
    >> in XP when in classic mode? I'll learn the new UI when and if I have the
    >> time and desire - for now, I need it to be what I'm used to because I
    >> don't have the time to learn how Microsoft thinks I should be using my
    >> computer.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Kerry Brown" <*a*m> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Improved aero peek, jump lists, and pinned items on the task bar are my
    >>> faves. In general the UI is smoother. Many things have been optimized to
    >>> give a better (faster) user experience. If you're happy with Vista
    >>> you'll love Windows 7. If you have ignored Vista you'll have an even
    >>> steeper learning curve with Windows 7.
    >>>
    >>> Things I don't like:
    >>>
    >>> Homegroup - it's a step backwards for security.
    >>>
    >>> Things that may be awesome in the next version of Windows:
    >>>
    >>> Libraries - cool idea, not implemented very well. It can cause a lot of
    >>> frustration and can't be turned off.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Kerry Brown
    >>> MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
    >>> http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Steve Johnson" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Hi
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm new to Windows 7. What do you think about the new features? Which
    >>>> one you like the most?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>>
    >>>> Steve Johnson

    >>
     
    Zootal, Aug 26, 2009
    #15
  16. Kerry Brown

    XS11E Guest

    "Zootal" <> wrote:

    > I ignored Vista, and if I can't get Windows 7 UI to work like XP
    > does, I might ignore it also.
    >
    > Having said that, I haven't seen an answer yet - is it possible to
    > get Win7 UI, specifically start menu and task bar, to function
    > like it does in XP when in classic mode?


    No, it's not. You can easily make Vista start menu and task bar
    function like XP, Vista does have the classic mode and I use it but I
    won't use Win7 because of the awful UI, it's been all downhill since
    Win2000 IMHO.

    --
    XS11E, Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project:
    http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
     
    XS11E, Aug 26, 2009
    #16
  17. Kerry Brown

    NetLink_Blue Guest

    XS11E wrote:
    > "Zootal" <> wrote:
    >
    >> I ignored Vista, and if I can't get Windows 7 UI to work like XP
    >> does, I might ignore it also.
    >>
    >> Having said that, I haven't seen an answer yet - is it possible to
    >> get Win7 UI, specifically start menu and task bar, to function
    >> like it does in XP when in classic mode?

    >
    > No, it's not. You can easily make Vista start menu and task bar
    > function like XP, Vista does have the classic mode and I use it but I
    > won't use Win7 because of the awful UI, it's been all downhill since
    > Win2000 IMHO.
    >



    XS11E,

    I don't want to boogle your mind, or push you into the 21st century.
    You know, old dog / new tricks. I am getting set in my ways as well.
    (woof)

    Using Vista's/Win-7's "downhill" UI, if you start to type a folder or
    program name in Start orb's Search Bar, the OS will quickly list items
    to click on.

    You'll have to check this out on somebody's computer that's "with it".

    I was going to recommend Zootal check out WinStep, but that requires a
    lot of work/setup. I might purchase and try it out on my Windows 7
    setup. I have an older version loaded on my Windows-2000 partition.

    NetLink_Blue
     
    NetLink_Blue, Sep 3, 2009
    #17
  18. Kerry Brown

    Zootal Guest

    "NetLink_Blue" <> wrote in message
    news:%23Xs%...
    > XS11E wrote:
    >> "Zootal" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I ignored Vista, and if I can't get Windows 7 UI to work like XP
    >>> does, I might ignore it also.
    >>>
    >>> Having said that, I haven't seen an answer yet - is it possible to
    >>> get Win7 UI, specifically start menu and task bar, to function
    >>> like it does in XP when in classic mode?

    >>
    >> No, it's not. You can easily make Vista start menu and task bar function
    >> like XP, Vista does have the classic mode and I use it but I won't use
    >> Win7 because of the awful UI, it's been all downhill since Win2000 IMHO.
    >>

    >
    >
    > XS11E,
    >
    > I don't want to boogle your mind, or push you into the 21st century. You
    > know, old dog / new tricks. I am getting set in my ways as well. (woof)
    >
    > Using Vista's/Win-7's "downhill" UI, if you start to type a folder or
    > program name in Start orb's Search Bar, the OS will quickly list items to
    > click on.
    >
    > You'll have to check this out on somebody's computer that's "with it".
    >
    > I was going to recommend Zootal check out WinStep, but that requires a lot
    > of work/setup. I might purchase and try it out on my Windows 7 setup. I
    > have an older version loaded on my Windows-2000 partition.
    >
    > NetLink_Blue


    Several years ago I was working in a support capacity for the DOE at the
    NTS. We had a lot of older users that were being given PCs for the first
    time, and we were met with a lot of resistance. Whaddya mean you are going
    to take away my typewriter and give me this new-fangled computer thingy?
    Considering we were giving them CP/M machines with floppy drives, I don't
    really blame them - those were pretty lousy machines and working with a
    floppy drive based system was a pain in the butt. It wasn't until we
    converted the CP/M users to DOS machines with internal hard drives and gave
    them WordPerfect that the computers were really usable and viable
    replacements for their typewriters. And even then we were met with a lot of
    resistance. People just didn't want to give up what worked for them and what
    they were comfortable with.

    The challenge is to convince people that the new system is not only better
    then the old, but better enough to make it worth upgrading. Convincing
    people to use those crappy CP/M machines was a hard sell. Going from a
    typewriter to WordPerfect (once WP5.0 came out) was not at all difficult.
    Converting people from Win3.x to Win95 was also easy. That UI style started
    with Win95 has lasted fifteen years. Now Microsoft wants us to make another
    shift in how we user our computers. And like many people, I'm a bit older,
    what I have works, and I'm not convinced that this new-fangled system is
    good enough to make it worth giving up my Windows XP. IMNSHO, Microsoft made
    a big mistake by not having an XP compability mode in Windows 7. It's going
    to cost them a lot of sales.
     
    Zootal, Sep 3, 2009
    #18
  19. Kerry Brown

    Zootal Guest

    "Zootal" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "NetLink_Blue" <> wrote in message
    > news:%23Xs%...
    >> XS11E wrote:
    >>> "Zootal" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I ignored Vista, and if I can't get Windows 7 UI to work like XP
    >>>> does, I might ignore it also.
    >>>>
    >>>> Having said that, I haven't seen an answer yet - is it possible to
    >>>> get Win7 UI, specifically start menu and task bar, to function
    >>>> like it does in XP when in classic mode?
    >>>
    >>> No, it's not. You can easily make Vista start menu and task bar
    >>> function like XP, Vista does have the classic mode and I use it but I
    >>> won't use Win7 because of the awful UI, it's been all downhill since
    >>> Win2000 IMHO.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> XS11E,
    >>
    >> I don't want to boogle your mind, or push you into the 21st century. You
    >> know, old dog / new tricks. I am getting set in my ways as well. (woof)
    >>
    >> Using Vista's/Win-7's "downhill" UI, if you start to type a folder or
    >> program name in Start orb's Search Bar, the OS will quickly list items to
    >> click on.
    >>
    >> You'll have to check this out on somebody's computer that's "with it".
    >>
    >> I was going to recommend Zootal check out WinStep, but that requires a
    >> lot of work/setup. I might purchase and try it out on my Windows 7
    >> setup. I have an older version loaded on my Windows-2000 partition.
    >>
    >> NetLink_Blue

    >
    > Several years ago I was working in a support capacity for the DOE at the
    > NTS. We had a lot of older users that were being given PCs for the first
    > time, and we were met with a lot of resistance. Whaddya mean you are going
    > to take away my typewriter and give me this new-fangled computer thingy?
    > Considering we were giving them CP/M machines with floppy drives, I don't
    > really blame them - those were pretty lousy machines and working with a
    > floppy drive based system was a pain in the butt. It wasn't until we
    > converted the CP/M users to DOS machines with internal hard drives and
    > gave them WordPerfect that the computers were really usable and viable
    > replacements for their typewriters. And even then we were met with a lot
    > of resistance. People just didn't want to give up what worked for them and
    > what they were comfortable with.
    >
    > The challenge is to convince people that the new system is not only better
    > then the old, but better enough to make it worth upgrading. Convincing
    > people to use those crappy CP/M machines was a hard sell. Going from a
    > typewriter to WordPerfect (once WP5.0 came out) was not at all difficult.
    > Converting people from Win3.x to Win95 was also easy. That UI style
    > started with Win95 has lasted fifteen years. Now Microsoft wants us to
    > make another shift in how we user our computers. And like many people, I'm
    > a bit older, what I have works, and I'm not convinced that this
    > new-fangled system is good enough to make it worth giving up my Windows
    > XP. IMNSHO, Microsoft made a big mistake by not having an XP compability
    > mode in Windows 7. It's going to cost them a lot of sales.


    PS: I looked at WinStep a while ago, but it didn't do anything that excited
    me. If it can make Win7 work like WinXP, then I might get excited about it
    :)
     
    Zootal, Sep 3, 2009
    #19
  20. Kerry Brown

    XS11E Guest

    NetLink_Blue <> wrote:

    > Using Vista's/Win-7's "downhill" UI, if you start to type a folder
    > or program name in Start orb's Search Bar, the OS will quickly
    > list items to click on.


    That's so DOS 5.0 days! Typing is for old fogies, if it can't be done
    with a mouse click it's too old fashioned for me.



    --
    XS11E, Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project:
    http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
     
    XS11E, Sep 4, 2009
    #20
    1. Advertising

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