Re: win 7 partitions

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by chuckcar, Oct 18, 2010.

  1. chuckcar

    chuckcar Guest

    "Dr.Dan" <nospam.com> wrote in
    news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:

    > I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned. Half
    > as the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine, I will
    > keep an eye on things and manage where data goes and that kind of
    > thing. But my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop and it came
    > partitioned c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery data. Thing is
    > she would never manage the drives. If the c drive filled up she would
    > not know to go to the next partition.


    That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    device.

    > So my questions are why do the manufacturers do this, is there a
    > practical reason? Should I resize the c partition on her machine to
    > eliminate the e drive? Thanks for your help.


    Do that and she'll have problems. Bad ones. However, the one question I
    do have is what *physical* drives are C: D: and E: *on*?

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Oct 18, 2010
    #1
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  2. chuckcar

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    On 18/10/2010 16:23, chuckcar wrote:
    > "Dr.Dan"<nospam.com> wrote in
    > news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >
    >> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned. Half
    >> as the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine, I will
    >> keep an eye on things and manage where data goes and that kind of
    >> thing. But my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop and it came
    >> partitioned c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery data. Thing is
    >> she would never manage the drives. If the c drive filled up she would
    >> not know to go to the next partition.

    >
    > That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    > device.


    Good old chucktard, answering a different question.
    >
    >> So my questions are why do the manufacturers do this, is there a
    >> practical reason? Should I resize the c partition on her machine to
    >> eliminate the e drive? Thanks for your help.

    >
    > Do that and she'll have problems. Bad ones. However, the one question I
    > do have is what *physical* drives are C: D: and E: *on*?
    >


    How many laptops have you seen with more than one hard drive?
     
    Desk Rabbit, Oct 18, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. chuckcar

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 15:23:00 +0000, chuckcar wrote:

    > "Dr.Dan" <nospam.com> wrote in
    > news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >
    >> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned. Half as
    >> the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine, I will keep
    >> an eye on things and manage where data goes and that kind of thing. But
    >> my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop and it came partitioned
    >> c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery data. Thing is she would
    >> never manage the drives. If the c drive filled up she would not know to
    >> go to the next partition.

    >
    > That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    > device.


    What is your preferred *vaild* 'backup device' for me? I want to backup
    about 500 gigabytes of data. I don't have a lot of money.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Oct 18, 2010
    #3
  4. Desk Rabbit wrote:
    > On 18/10/2010 16:23, chuckcar wrote:
    >> "Dr.Dan"<nospam.com> wrote in
    >> news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >>
    >>> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned. Half
    >>> as the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine, I will
    >>> keep an eye on things and manage where data goes and that kind of
    >>> thing. But my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop and it came
    >>> partitioned c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery data. Thing is
    >>> she would never manage the drives. If the c drive filled up she would
    >>> not know to go to the next partition.

    >>
    >> That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    >> device.

    >
    > Good old chucktard, answering a different question.
    >>
    >>> So my questions are why do the manufacturers do this, is there a
    >>> practical reason? Should I resize the c partition on her machine to
    >>> eliminate the e drive? Thanks for your help.

    >>
    >> Do that and she'll have problems. Bad ones. However, the one question I
    >> do have is what *physical* drives are C: D: and E: *on*?
    >>

    >
    > How many laptops have you seen with more than one hard drive?


    External drives dont count?

    --
    www.skepticalscience.com|www.youtube.com/officialpeta
    cageprisoners.com|www.snuhwolf.9f.com|www.eyeonpalin.org
    _____ ____ ____ __ /\_/\ __ _ ______ _____
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    /___/_/|_/\____/_//_/ \_@_/ \__|\__|\____/\____\_\
     
    §ñühw¤£f, Oct 18, 2010
    #4
  5. chuckcar

    chuckcar Guest

    Meat Plow <> wrote in
    news:p:

    > On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 15:23:00 +0000, chuckcar wrote:
    >
    >> "Dr.Dan" <nospam.com> wrote in
    >> news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >>
    >>> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned. Half
    >>> as the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine, I
    >>> will keep an eye on things and manage where data goes and that kind
    >>> of thing. But my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop and it
    >>> came partitioned c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery data.
    >>> Thing is she would never manage the drives. If the c drive filled up
    >>> she would not know to go to the next partition.

    >>
    >> That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    >> device.

    >
    > What is your preferred *vaild* 'backup device' for me? I want to
    > backup about 500 gigabytes of data. I don't have a lot of money.
    >

    Then you've got a problem. Either with your lifestyle Arthur, or with
    what you're deciding to include. Time to put a Dent in that number.


    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Oct 18, 2010
    #5
  6. chuckcar

    freemont Guest

    On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 15:23:00 +0000, chuckcar writ:

    > "Dr.Dan" <nospam.com> wrote in
    > news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >
    >> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned. Half as
    >> the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine, I will keep
    >> an eye on things and manage where data goes and that kind of thing. But
    >> my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop and it came partitioned
    >> c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery data. Thing is she would
    >> never manage the drives. If the c drive filled up she would not know to
    >> go to the next partition.

    >
    > That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    > device.
    >
    >> So my questions are why do the manufacturers do this, is there a
    >> practical reason? Should I resize the c partition on her machine to
    >> eliminate the e drive? Thanks for your help.

    >
    > Do that and she'll have problems. Bad ones. However, the one question I
    > do have is what *physical* drives are C: D: and E: *on*?


    Ummm... probably the one inside the laptop, Chuck.
    --
    â‚ "Because all you of Earth are idiots!"
    â‚ Beware the 24hoursupport tards:
    â‚ http://24hoursupport-tards.info
    ¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·-> ※freemont※ <-·´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯
     
    freemont, Oct 18, 2010
    #6
  7. chuckcar

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 21:01:06 +0000, chuckcar wrote:

    > Meat Plow <> wrote in
    > news:p:
    >
    >> On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 15:23:00 +0000, chuckcar wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Dr.Dan" <nospam.com> wrote in
    >>> news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >>>
    >>>> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned. Half
    >>>> as the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine, I will
    >>>> keep an eye on things and manage where data goes and that kind of
    >>>> thing. But my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop and it came
    >>>> partitioned c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery data. Thing
    >>>> is she would never manage the drives. If the c drive filled up she
    >>>> would not know to go to the next partition.
    >>>
    >>> That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    >>> device.

    >>
    >> What is your preferred *vaild* 'backup device' for me? I want to backup
    >> about 500 gigabytes of data. I don't have a lot of money.
    >>

    > Then you've got a problem. Either with your lifestyle Arthur, or with
    > what you're deciding to include. Time to put a Dent in that number.


    Ahhh OK. So I can't backup 500 GB?

    Problem is all my data is A/V which in raw format notoriously consumes
    gigabytes like you consume liquor. But I cannot delete the raw A/V files
    because they all represent works in progress.

    Are you sure there isn't a low cost solution for backing up my data? I
    thought a 1 TB eSATA drive might be a *vaild* solution since it would not
    be powered up except when processing a backup.

    It would seem (at least to me) that a live copy plus one on non-spinning
    media would give me enough redundancy since the chances of both failing
    are pretty much non-existent.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Oct 18, 2010
    #7
  8. chuckcar

    Bill Guest

    On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 22:30:15 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow
    <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 21:01:06 +0000, chuckcar wrote:
    >
    >> Meat Plow <> wrote in
    >> news:p:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 15:23:00 +0000, chuckcar wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Dr.Dan" <nospam.com> wrote in
    >>>> news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned. Half
    >>>>> as the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine, I will
    >>>>> keep an eye on things and manage where data goes and that kind of
    >>>>> thing. But my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop and it came
    >>>>> partitioned c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery data. Thing
    >>>>> is she would never manage the drives. If the c drive filled up she
    >>>>> would not know to go to the next partition.
    >>>>
    >>>> That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    >>>> device.
    >>>
    >>> What is your preferred *vaild* 'backup device' for me? I want to backup
    >>> about 500 gigabytes of data. I don't have a lot of money.
    >>>

    >> Then you've got a problem. Either with your lifestyle Arthur, or with
    >> what you're deciding to include. Time to put a Dent in that number.

    >
    >Ahhh OK. So I can't backup 500 GB?
    >
    >Problem is all my data is A/V which in raw format notoriously consumes
    >gigabytes like you consume liquor. But I cannot delete the raw A/V files
    >because they all represent works in progress.
    >
    >Are you sure there isn't a low cost solution for backing up my data? I
    >thought a 1 TB eSATA drive might be a *vaild* solution since it would not
    >be powered up except when processing a backup.
    >
    >It would seem (at least to me) that a live copy plus one on non-spinning
    >media would give me enough redundancy since the chances of both failing
    >are pretty much non-existent.


    Honestly? In your business, the pros generally feel that unless you
    have something stored in at least three places, it doesn't really
    exist. At least one of the three places has to be another physical
    location. You don't want to be wiped out by fire, flood or theft.

    One backup is certainly far better than none, but I wouldn't consider
    the material very secure at all.
     
    Bill, Oct 18, 2010
    #8
  9. chuckcar

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 18:40:53 -0400, Bill wrote:

    > On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 22:30:15 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 21:01:06 +0000, chuckcar wrote:
    >>
    >>> Meat Plow <> wrote in
    >>> news:p:
    >>>
    >>>> On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 15:23:00 +0000, chuckcar wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> "Dr.Dan" <nospam.com> wrote in
    >>>>> news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned.
    >>>>>> Half as the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine,
    >>>>>> I will keep an eye on things and manage where data goes and that
    >>>>>> kind of thing. But my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop
    >>>>>> and it came partitioned c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery
    >>>>>> data. Thing is she would never manage the drives. If the c drive
    >>>>>> filled up she would not know to go to the next partition.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    >>>>> device.
    >>>>
    >>>> What is your preferred *vaild* 'backup device' for me? I want to
    >>>> backup about 500 gigabytes of data. I don't have a lot of money.
    >>>>
    >>> Then you've got a problem. Either with your lifestyle Arthur, or with
    >>> what you're deciding to include. Time to put a Dent in that number.

    >>
    >>Ahhh OK. So I can't backup 500 GB?
    >>
    >>Problem is all my data is A/V which in raw format notoriously consumes
    >>gigabytes like you consume liquor. But I cannot delete the raw A/V files
    >>because they all represent works in progress.
    >>
    >>Are you sure there isn't a low cost solution for backing up my data? I
    >>thought a 1 TB eSATA drive might be a *vaild* solution since it would
    >>not be powered up except when processing a backup.
    >>
    >>It would seem (at least to me) that a live copy plus one on non-spinning
    >>media would give me enough redundancy since the chances of both failing
    >>are pretty much non-existent.

    >
    > Honestly? In your business, the pros generally feel that unless you have
    > something stored in at least three places, it doesn't really exist. At
    > least one of the three places has to be another physical location. You
    > don't want to be wiped out by fire, flood or theft.
    >
    > One backup is certainly far better than none, but I wouldn't consider
    > the material very secure at all.


    Ok well I'll purchase an eSATA and a removable, backup to both and store
    the removable in my bank deposit box. Or should I make sure I have one
    also in another bank in case it gets robbed or flooded or burns down?



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Oct 19, 2010
    #9
  10. chuckcar

    Bill Guest

    On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 23:02:08 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow
    <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 18:40:53 -0400, Bill wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 22:30:15 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 21:01:06 +0000, chuckcar wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Meat Plow <> wrote in
    >>>> news:p:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 15:23:00 +0000, chuckcar wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> "Dr.Dan" <nospam.com> wrote in
    >>>>>> news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned.
    >>>>>>> Half as the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine,
    >>>>>>> I will keep an eye on things and manage where data goes and that
    >>>>>>> kind of thing. But my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop
    >>>>>>> and it came partitioned c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery
    >>>>>>> data. Thing is she would never manage the drives. If the c drive
    >>>>>>> filled up she would not know to go to the next partition.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    >>>>>> device.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> What is your preferred *vaild* 'backup device' for me? I want to
    >>>>> backup about 500 gigabytes of data. I don't have a lot of money.
    >>>>>
    >>>> Then you've got a problem. Either with your lifestyle Arthur, or with
    >>>> what you're deciding to include. Time to put a Dent in that number.
    >>>
    >>>Ahhh OK. So I can't backup 500 GB?
    >>>
    >>>Problem is all my data is A/V which in raw format notoriously consumes
    >>>gigabytes like you consume liquor. But I cannot delete the raw A/V files
    >>>because they all represent works in progress.
    >>>
    >>>Are you sure there isn't a low cost solution for backing up my data? I
    >>>thought a 1 TB eSATA drive might be a *vaild* solution since it would
    >>>not be powered up except when processing a backup.
    >>>
    >>>It would seem (at least to me) that a live copy plus one on non-spinning
    >>>media would give me enough redundancy since the chances of both failing
    >>>are pretty much non-existent.

    >>
    >> Honestly? In your business, the pros generally feel that unless you have
    >> something stored in at least three places, it doesn't really exist. At
    >> least one of the three places has to be another physical location. You
    >> don't want to be wiped out by fire, flood or theft.
    >>
    >> One backup is certainly far better than none, but I wouldn't consider
    >> the material very secure at all.

    >
    >Ok well I'll purchase an eSATA and a removable, backup to both and store
    >the removable in my bank deposit box. Or should I make sure I have one
    >also in another bank in case it gets robbed or flooded or burns down?


    That depends on how much security you think is reasonable, practical,
    and necessary. Three places is just a minimum.

    I used to take rotating backups home, figuring my business and house
    were unlikely to both burn down at the same time.
     
    Bill, Oct 19, 2010
    #10
  11. chuckcar

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    On 18/10/2010 20:41, §ñühw¤£f wrote:
    > Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >> On 18/10/2010 16:23, chuckcar wrote:
    >>> "Dr.Dan"<nospam.com> wrote in
    >>> news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >>>
    >>>> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned. Half
    >>>> as the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats fine, I will
    >>>> keep an eye on things and manage where data goes and that kind of
    >>>> thing. But my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit laptop and it came
    >>>> partitioned c, d and e. The d partition is for recovery data. Thing is
    >>>> she would never manage the drives. If the c drive filled up she would
    >>>> not know to go to the next partition.
    >>>
    >>> That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild backup
    >>> device.

    >>
    >> Good old chucktard, answering a different question.
    >>>
    >>>> So my questions are why do the manufacturers do this, is there a
    >>>> practical reason? Should I resize the c partition on her machine to
    >>>> eliminate the e drive? Thanks for your help.
    >>>
    >>> Do that and she'll have problems. Bad ones. However, the one question I
    >>> do have is what *physical* drives are C: D: and E: *on*?
    >>>

    >>
    >> How many laptops have you seen with more than one hard drive?

    >
    > External drives dont count?
    >

    In this context probably not.
     
    Desk Rabbit, Oct 19, 2010
    #11
  12. chuckcar

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 19:26:13 -0400, Bill wrote:

    > On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 23:02:08 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 18:40:53 -0400, Bill wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 22:30:15 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 21:01:06 +0000, chuckcar wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Meat Plow <> wrote in
    >>>>> news:p:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 15:23:00 +0000, chuckcar wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "Dr.Dan" <nospam.com> wrote in
    >>>>>>> news:Xns9E1520CB778Fnospam@216.196.97.131:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I have a win 7 64 bit os which came with the drive partitioned.
    >>>>>>>> Half as the c and the other half as the d drive. For me thats
    >>>>>>>> fine, I will keep an eye on things and manage where data goes and
    >>>>>>>> that kind of thing. But my daughter just bought a win 7 64 bit
    >>>>>>>> laptop and it came partitioned c, d and e. The d partition is for
    >>>>>>>> recovery data. Thing is she would never manage the drives. If the
    >>>>>>>> c drive filled up she would not know to go to the next partition.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> That's what backups are for. A hard drive is *never* a vaild
    >>>>>>> backup device.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> What is your preferred *vaild* 'backup device' for me? I want to
    >>>>>> backup about 500 gigabytes of data. I don't have a lot of money.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> Then you've got a problem. Either with your lifestyle Arthur, or
    >>>>> with what you're deciding to include. Time to put a Dent in that
    >>>>> number.
    >>>>
    >>>>Ahhh OK. So I can't backup 500 GB?
    >>>>
    >>>>Problem is all my data is A/V which in raw format notoriously consumes
    >>>>gigabytes like you consume liquor. But I cannot delete the raw A/V
    >>>>files because they all represent works in progress.
    >>>>
    >>>>Are you sure there isn't a low cost solution for backing up my data? I
    >>>>thought a 1 TB eSATA drive might be a *vaild* solution since it would
    >>>>not be powered up except when processing a backup.
    >>>>
    >>>>It would seem (at least to me) that a live copy plus one on
    >>>>non-spinning media would give me enough redundancy since the chances
    >>>>of both failing are pretty much non-existent.
    >>>
    >>> Honestly? In your business, the pros generally feel that unless you
    >>> have something stored in at least three places, it doesn't really
    >>> exist. At least one of the three places has to be another physical
    >>> location. You don't want to be wiped out by fire, flood or theft.
    >>>
    >>> One backup is certainly far better than none, but I wouldn't consider
    >>> the material very secure at all.

    >>
    >>Ok well I'll purchase an eSATA and a removable, backup to both and store
    >>the removable in my bank deposit box. Or should I make sure I have one
    >>also in another bank in case it gets robbed or flooded or burns down?

    >
    > That depends on how much security you think is reasonable, practical,
    > and necessary. Three places is just a minimum.
    >
    > I used to take rotating backups home, figuring my business and house
    > were unlikely to both burn down at the same time.


    All the business accounts I administrated before my semi-retirement in
    2003 were backed up to 8 gig Travan 7 days a week, with 2 backup sets
    being rotated bi-weekly. One set went home with the office manager. These
    were from financial institutions (banks and credit unions) and law
    offices.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Oct 19, 2010
    #12
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