Re: Why doesn't video file get laid down starting at the end of the last file on a defragged drive?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Richard Crowley, Jan 7, 2008.

  1. "Doc" wrote ...
    > After defragging a drive with PerfectDisk8, using the aggressive
    > setting, I captured a lengthy DV video file. However, after analyzing
    > the disk, the file shows to have been laid down in several chunks
    > instead of one contiguous chunk. Why is that?


    Because operating systems like MSwin use a compromise,
    "all-purpose", generic algorithm for determining where to put
    files, both beginning allocations, and subsequent extents. This
    algorithm is clearly not optimized for allocation of large,
    contiguous files (like video and audio files). There are a great
    many reasons for this, most of which are beyond the scope of
    a newsgroup discussion such as this.

    This algorithm may be published and/or discussed somewhere,
    but, like the weather, we can talk about it all we like, but there
    isn't much we can DO about it.

    Perhaps it would be more fruitful for you to explain why you
    are asking. Is there some issue you are trying to resolve?
     
    Richard Crowley, Jan 7, 2008
    #1
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  2. Richard Crowley

    Joe Guest

    One would presume that editing work with a video file broken into pieces may
    be less than optimum.

    Joe


    "Richard Crowley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Doc" wrote ...
    >> After defragging a drive with PerfectDisk8, using the aggressive
    >> setting, I captured a lengthy DV video file. However, after analyzing
    >> the disk, the file shows to have been laid down in several chunks
    >> instead of one contiguous chunk. Why is that?

    >
    > Because operating systems like MSwin use a compromise,
    > "all-purpose", generic algorithm for determining where to put
    > files, both beginning allocations, and subsequent extents. This
    > algorithm is clearly not optimized for allocation of large,
    > contiguous files (like video and audio files). There are a great
    > many reasons for this, most of which are beyond the scope of
    > a newsgroup discussion such as this.
    >
    > This algorithm may be published and/or discussed somewhere,
    > but, like the weather, we can talk about it all we like, but there
    > isn't much we can DO about it.
    >
    > Perhaps it would be more fruitful for you to explain why you
    > are asking. Is there some issue you are trying to resolve?
    >
     
    Joe, Jan 9, 2008
    #2
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  3. Richard Crowley

    nappy Guest

    "Joe" <> wrote in message news:x22hj.6512$vX6.5858@trndny05...
    > One would presume that editing work with a video file broken into pieces
    > may be less than optimum.
    >
    > Joe


    Perhaps. But if optimum means the file can be accessed at the required speed
    with the required throughput then it is a nonissue because it fulfills the
    requirements.


    >
    >
    > "Richard Crowley" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> "Doc" wrote ...
    >>> After defragging a drive with PerfectDisk8, using the aggressive
    >>> setting, I captured a lengthy DV video file. However, after analyzing
    >>> the disk, the file shows to have been laid down in several chunks
    >>> instead of one contiguous chunk. Why is that?

    >>
    >> Because operating systems like MSwin use a compromise,
    >> "all-purpose", generic algorithm for determining where to put
    >> files, both beginning allocations, and subsequent extents. This
    >> algorithm is clearly not optimized for allocation of large,
    >> contiguous files (like video and audio files). There are a great
    >> many reasons for this, most of which are beyond the scope of
    >> a newsgroup discussion such as this.
    >>
    >> This algorithm may be published and/or discussed somewhere,
    >> but, like the weather, we can talk about it all we like, but there
    >> isn't much we can DO about it.
    >>
    >> Perhaps it would be more fruitful for you to explain why you
    >> are asking. Is there some issue you are trying to resolve?
    >>

    >
     
    nappy, Jan 9, 2008
    #3
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