Re: Why does the iPhone take such crappy photos?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by dorayme, Jul 6, 2013.

  1. dorayme

    dorayme Guest

    In article <51d74d2b$0$3747$>,
    Mitch Bujard <DontWantSpam-But_'Reply-to'>
    wrote:

    > I have already perfected a DIY tripod attachment for the iPhone, but
    > now, with a convenient remote control, it becomes possible to obtain
    > really good, stable pictures and movies, without having to play feather
    > touch.


    You can also use virtual remote control. With almost any digital
    camera you can set it firmly somewhere (like on a tripod) and use the
    timer to allow yourself to get off it and be far enough away to not
    affect it.

    This has been proven in university trials using camera carrying jack
    hammers. With the camera mounted on the working hammer, the pictures
    are often quite blurred but if the jack hammer is trained to put the
    camera down and set it on a timer, and if the jack hammer uses this
    time to go to another suburb, the 'same' picture will often be as
    sharp as a pin.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jul 6, 2013
    #1
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  2. dorayme

    dorayme Guest

    In article <51d88ba0$0$2218$>,
    Mitch Bujard <DontWantSpam-But_'Reply-to'>
    wrote:

    > On 2013-07-06 00:49:42 +0000, dorayme said:
    >
    > > In article <51d74d2b$0$3747$>,
    > > Mitch Bujard <DontWantSpam-But_'Reply-to'>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> I have already perfected a DIY tripod attachment for the iPhone, but
    > >> now, with a convenient remote control, it becomes possible to obtain
    > >> really good, stable pictures and movies, without having to play feather
    > >> touch.

    > >
    > > You can also use virtual remote control. With almost any digital
    > > camera you can set it firmly somewhere (like on a tripod) and use the
    > > timer to allow yourself to get off it and be far enough away to not
    > > affect it.

    >
    > Sure. Antique film cameras had both timer and cord. Why ? Because mdels
    > don't always smile on command.


    Yes, of course, my idea was to use the timer when the exact time of
    the shot did not matter. Btw, The "decisive moment" is often overrated
    in the literature of photography. At least it is in its link to the
    taking of the shot (one of a number of close shots can be selected in
    'the darkroom' - the quotes being because we have all gone digital).

    Wonder if digital cameras can be set on timers and also to take a
    number of successive shots on the fall of the flag?

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jul 7, 2013
    #2
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  3. dorayme

    PeterN Guest

    On 7/6/2013 7:25 PM, dorayme wrote:
    > In article <51d88ba0$0$2218$>,
    > Mitch Bujard <DontWantSpam-But_'Reply-to'>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On 2013-07-06 00:49:42 +0000, dorayme said:
    >>
    >>> In article <51d74d2b$0$3747$>,
    >>> Mitch Bujard <DontWantSpam-But_'Reply-to'>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I have already perfected a DIY tripod attachment for the iPhone, but
    >>>> now, with a convenient remote control, it becomes possible to obtain
    >>>> really good, stable pictures and movies, without having to play feather
    >>>> touch.
    >>>
    >>> You can also use virtual remote control. With almost any digital
    >>> camera you can set it firmly somewhere (like on a tripod) and use the
    >>> timer to allow yourself to get off it and be far enough away to not
    >>> affect it.

    >>
    >> Sure. Antique film cameras had both timer and cord. Why ? Because mdels
    >> don't always smile on command.

    >
    > Yes, of course, my idea was to use the timer when the exact time of
    > the shot did not matter. Btw, The "decisive moment" is often overrated
    > in the literature of photography. At least it is in its link to the
    > taking of the shot (one of a number of close shots can be selected in
    > 'the darkroom' - the quotes being because we have all gone digital).
    >
    > Wonder if digital cameras can be set on timers and also to take a
    > number of successive shots on the fall of the flag?
    >


    Some do. Look for "time lapse" in your manual

    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jul 7, 2013
    #3
  4. dorayme

    Paul Sture Guest

    In article <>,
    dorayme <> wrote:

    > In article <51d88ba0$0$2218$>,
    > Mitch Bujard <DontWantSpam-But_'Reply-to'>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > On 2013-07-06 00:49:42 +0000, dorayme said:
    > >
    > > > In article <51d74d2b$0$3747$>,
    > > > Mitch Bujard <DontWantSpam-But_'Reply-to'>
    > > > wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> I have already perfected a DIY tripod attachment for the iPhone, but
    > > >> now, with a convenient remote control, it becomes possible to obtain
    > > >> really good, stable pictures and movies, without having to play feather
    > > >> touch.
    > > >
    > > > You can also use virtual remote control. With almost any digital
    > > > camera you can set it firmly somewhere (like on a tripod) and use the
    > > > timer to allow yourself to get off it and be far enough away to not
    > > > affect it.

    > >
    > > Sure. Antique film cameras had both timer and cord. Why ? Because mdels
    > > don't always smile on command.

    >
    > Yes, of course, my idea was to use the timer when the exact time of
    > the shot did not matter. Btw, The "decisive moment" is often overrated
    > in the literature of photography. At least it is in its link to the
    > taking of the shot (one of a number of close shots can be selected in
    > 'the darkroom' - the quotes being because we have all gone digital).
    >
    > Wonder if digital cameras can be set on timers and also to take a
    > number of successive shots on the fall of the flag?


    I haven't tried this but my digital camera can apparently be set to take
    a photo when it detects a smile or a wink. There's also a Face Timer:

    "Using the Face Self-Timer

    To take a photo that includes the photographer, such a group photo,
    compose the shot, and press the shutter button. The camera will shoot
    two seconds after you enter the shot and it detects your face "

    No mention of flags falling though.

    --
    Paul Sture
     
    Paul Sture, Jul 8, 2013
    #4
  5. dorayme

    John Varela Guest

    On Mon, 8 Jul 2013 13:26:10 UTC, Paul Sture <> wrote:

    > I haven't tried this but my digital camera can apparently be set to take
    > a photo when it detects a smile or a wink. There's also a Face Timer:
    >
    > "Using the Face Self-Timer
    >
    > To take a photo that includes the photographer, such a group photo,
    > compose the shot, and press the shutter button. The camera will shoot
    > two seconds after you enter the shot and it detects your face "


    Do these features really work? The reason I ask is that half the
    time iPhoto can't recognize the existence of a face much less
    recognize it, yet it keeps thinking it sees faces in the shrubbery.
    And if the features work in a camera, why can't iPhoto do at least
    as well with a more powerful processor and more time?

    --
    John Varela
     
    John Varela, Jul 8, 2013
    #5
  6. dorayme

    nospam Guest

    In article <51W5y0sPNk52-pn2-Te5cKyfdVT6f@localhost>, John Varela
    <> wrote:

    > > I haven't tried this but my digital camera can apparently be set to take
    > > a photo when it detects a smile or a wink. There's also a Face Timer:
    > >
    > > "Using the Face Self-Timer
    > >
    > > To take a photo that includes the photographer, such a group photo,
    > > compose the shot, and press the shutter button. The camera will shoot
    > > two seconds after you enter the shot and it detects your face "

    >
    > Do these features really work? The reason I ask is that half the
    > time iPhoto can't recognize the existence of a face much less
    > recognize it, yet it keeps thinking it sees faces in the shrubbery.
    > And if the features work in a camera, why can't iPhoto do at least
    > as well with a more powerful processor and more time?


    i don't know why you're having problems with face recognition in
    iphoto. for me it works quite well.

    face detection in cameras also works quite well. it's ideal for people
    shots, since it's tied to autofocus, so you get people in focus rather
    than the trees behind them. it's also tied to the autoexposure so you
    get well exposed people and not well exposed backgrounds. the better
    cameras can track people as they move.
     
    nospam, Jul 8, 2013
    #6
  7. dorayme

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Paul Sture <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > dorayme <> wrote:
    >

    ....
    > > Wonder if digital cameras can be set on timers and also to take a
    > > number of successive shots on the fall of the flag?

    >
    > I haven't tried this but my digital camera can apparently be set to take
    > a photo when it detects a smile or a wink. There's also a Face Timer:
    >
    > "Using the Face Self-Timer
    >
    > To take a photo that includes the photographer, such a group photo,
    > compose the shot, and press the shutter button. The camera will shoot
    > two seconds after you enter the shot and it detects your face "
    >
    > No mention of flags falling though.



    Yes, that feature is in many camera these days, I turn it off, I hate
    seeing the same face twice.

    About flags... I just wondered if one could set a camera on a timer to
    take a number of close shots when the time specified was reached.

    btw, I have a cheap torch that senses movement in low light and comes
    on... perhaps consumer level cameras could be made to have an
    analogous feature: takes a snap when movement is detected. It would
    have helped me detect a possum in the roof of a house I was in a while
    back. Instead I had to take a low res movie overnight and then scan
    the result. No doubt I could have organised to link a motion detector
    device to the camera shutter button with a great deal of trouble! <g>

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jul 8, 2013
    #7
  8. dorayme

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > In article <>,
    > Paul Sture <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>,
    > > dorayme <> wrote:
    > >

    > ...
    > > > Wonder if digital cameras can be set on timers and also to take a
    > > > number of successive shots on the fall of the flag?

    > >
    > > I haven't tried this but my digital camera can apparently be set to take
    > > a photo when it detects a smile or a wink. There's also a Face Timer:
    > >
    > > "Using the Face Self-Timer
    > >
    > > To take a photo that includes the photographer, such a group photo,
    > > compose the shot, and press the shutter button. The camera will shoot
    > > two seconds after you enter the shot and it detects your face "
    > >
    > > No mention of flags falling though.

    >
    >
    > Yes, that feature is in many camera these days, I turn it off, I hate
    > seeing the same face twice.
    >
    > About flags... I just wondered if one could set a camera on a timer to
    > take a number of close shots when the time specified was reached.
    >
    > btw, I have a cheap torch that senses movement in low light and comes
    > on... perhaps consumer level cameras could be made to have an
    > analogous feature: takes a snap when movement is detected. It would
    > have helped me detect a possum in the roof of a house I was in a while
    > back. Instead I had to take a low res movie overnight and then scan
    > the result. No doubt I could have organised to link a motion detector
    > device to the camera shutter button with a great deal of trouble! <g>


    For certain Canon Powershot and EOS models there is an open source
    firmware add-on that provides the capabilities that you are describing
    and many others. If it doesn't have exactly what you want there's a
    provision for running your own scripts which may let you add it without
    too much difficulty.

    For more information see <http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK>,
    <http://magiclantern.wikia.com/wiki/Magic_Lantern_Firmware_Wiki>, and
    <https://code.google.com/p/400plus/>
     
    J. Clarke, Jul 9, 2013
    #8
  9. dorayme

    PeterN Guest

    On 7/8/2013 6:08 PM, dorayme wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Paul Sture <> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>,
    >> dorayme <> wrote:
    >>

    > ...
    >>> Wonder if digital cameras can be set on timers and also to take a
    >>> number of successive shots on the fall of the flag?

    >>
    >> I haven't tried this but my digital camera can apparently be set to take
    >> a photo when it detects a smile or a wink. There's also a Face Timer:
    >>
    >> "Using the Face Self-Timer
    >>
    >> To take a photo that includes the photographer, such a group photo,
    >> compose the shot, and press the shutter button. The camera will shoot
    >> two seconds after you enter the shot and it detects your face "
    >>
    >> No mention of flags falling though.

    >
    >
    > Yes, that feature is in many camera these days, I turn it off, I hate
    > seeing the same face twice.
    >
    > About flags... I just wondered if one could set a camera on a timer to
    > take a number of close shots when the time specified was reached.
    >
    > btw, I have a cheap torch that senses movement in low light and comes
    > on... perhaps consumer level cameras could be made to have an
    > analogous feature: takes a snap when movement is detected. It would
    > have helped me detect a possum in the roof of a house I was in a while
    > back. Instead I had to take a low res movie overnight and then scan
    > the result. No doubt I could have organised to link a motion detector
    > device to the camera shutter button with a great deal of trouble! <g>
    >



    Google is your friend:

    "motion detection shutter release"



    <https://www.google.com/search?q=motion+detection+shutter+release&rlz=1C1LENP_enUS540US540&oq=motion+detection+shutter+release&aqs=chrome.0.57j0l2j62.20337j0&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8>




    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jul 9, 2013
    #9
  10. dorayme

    Wes Groleau Guest

    On 07-08-2013 16:34, nospam wrote:
    > <> wrote:
    >>> I haven't tried this but my digital camera can apparently be set to take
    >>> a photo when it detects a smile or a wink. There's also a Face Timer:
    >>>
    >>> "Using the Face Self-Timer
    >>>
    >>> To take a photo that includes the photographer, such a group photo,
    >>> compose the shot, and press the shutter button. The camera will shoot
    >>> two seconds after you enter the shot and it detects your face "

    >>
    >> Do these features really work? The reason I ask is that half the
    >> time iPhoto can't recognize the existence of a face much less
    >> recognize it, yet it keeps thinking it sees faces in the shrubbery.
    >> And if the features work in a camera, why can't iPhoto do at least
    >> as well with a more powerful processor and more time?

    >
    > i don't know why you're having problems with face recognition in
    > iphoto. for me it works quite well.


    On my iPhone, I've seen it work often, and I've seen it not work often.
    But when it doesn't work, I just touch the place I want optimized, and
    the iPhone adjusts focus and brightness to that spot. Hard to do on
    close-ups, since a one¹ percent change in distance can mess it up.

    ¹two, four, I don't know, but it's not much

    --
    Wes Groleau

    You always have time for what you do first.
     
    Wes Groleau, Jul 9, 2013
    #10
  11. dorayme

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    "J. Clarke" <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > says...
    > >

    ....
    > > btw, I have a cheap torch that senses movement in low light and comes
    > > on... perhaps consumer level cameras could be made to have an
    > > analogous feature: takes a snap when movement is detected. It would
    > > have helped me detect a possum in the roof of a house I was in a while
    > > back. Instead I had to take a low res movie overnight and then scan
    > > the result. No doubt I could have organised to link a motion detector
    > > device to the camera shutter button with a great deal of trouble! <g>

    >
    > For certain Canon Powershot and EOS models there is an open source
    > firmware add-on that provides the capabilities that you are describing
    > and many others. If it doesn't have exactly what you want there's a
    > provision for running your own scripts which may let you add it without
    > too much difficulty.
    >
    > For more information see <http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK>,
    > <http://magiclantern.wikia.com/wiki/Magic_Lantern_Firmware_Wiki>, and
    > <https://code.google.com/p/400plus/>


    Where I am now, (on the beautiful Sydney Harbour), there will never be
    a possum problem... but if I ever need motion detection, I will look
    into your links. I have one Canon, a G11 (nice camera, good for low
    light).

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jul 9, 2013
    #11
  12. dorayme

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > In article <>,
    > "J. Clarke" <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>,
    > > says...
    > > >

    > ...
    > > > btw, I have a cheap torch that senses movement in low light and comes
    > > > on... perhaps consumer level cameras could be made to have an
    > > > analogous feature: takes a snap when movement is detected. It would
    > > > have helped me detect a possum in the roof of a house I was in a while
    > > > back. Instead I had to take a low res movie overnight and then scan
    > > > the result. No doubt I could have organised to link a motion detector
    > > > device to the camera shutter button with a great deal of trouble! <g>

    > >
    > > For certain Canon Powershot and EOS models there is an open source
    > > firmware add-on that provides the capabilities that you are describing
    > > and many others. If it doesn't have exactly what you want there's a
    > > provision for running your own scripts which may let you add it without
    > > too much difficulty.
    > >
    > > For more information see <http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK>,
    > > <http://magiclantern.wikia.com/wiki/Magic_Lantern_Firmware_Wiki>, and
    > > <https://code.google.com/p/400plus/>

    >
    > Where I am now, (on the beautiful Sydney Harbour), there will never be
    > a possum problem... but if I ever need motion detection, I will look
    > into your links. I have one Canon, a G11 (nice camera, good for low
    > light).


    The G11 is supported, although in beta. You might want to check it
    out--one thing it's good for is capturing lightning strikes over the
    harbor.
     
    J. Clarke, Jul 9, 2013
    #12
  13. dorayme

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    "J. Clarke" <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > says...
    > >
    > > In article <>,
    > > "J. Clarke" <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <>,
    > > > says...
    > > > >

    > > ...
    > > > > btw, I have a cheap torch that senses movement in low light and comes
    > > > > on... perhaps consumer level cameras could be made to have an
    > > > > analogous feature: takes a snap when movement is detected. It would
    > > > > have helped me detect a possum in the roof of a house I was in a while
    > > > > back. Instead I had to take a low res movie overnight and then scan
    > > > > the result. No doubt I could have organised to link a motion detector
    > > > > device to the camera shutter button with a great deal of trouble! <g>
    > > >
    > > > For certain Canon Powershot and EOS models there is an open source
    > > > firmware add-on that provides the capabilities that you are describing
    > > > and many others. If it doesn't have exactly what you want there's a
    > > > provision for running your own scripts which may let you add it without
    > > > too much difficulty.
    > > >
    > > > For more information see <http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK>,
    > > > <http://magiclantern.wikia.com/wiki/Magic_Lantern_Firmware_Wiki>, and
    > > > <https://code.google.com/p/400plus/>

    > >
    > > Where I am now, (on the beautiful Sydney Harbour), there will never be
    > > a possum problem... but if I ever need motion detection, I will look
    > > into your links. I have one Canon, a G11 (nice camera, good for low
    > > light).

    >
    > The G11 is supported, although in beta. You might want to check it
    > out--one thing it's good for is capturing lightning strikes over the
    > harbor.


    Right, thanks... so I see at the links you provided. If I ever need
    the facility again, I will look into this more thoroughly.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jul 9, 2013
    #13
  14. dorayme

    PeterN Guest

    On 7/9/2013 6:32 PM, dorayme wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > "J. Clarke" <> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>,
    >> says...
    >>>
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> "J. Clarke" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In article <>,
    >>>> says...
    >>>>>
    >>> ...
    >>>>> btw, I have a cheap torch that senses movement in low light and comes
    >>>>> on... perhaps consumer level cameras could be made to have an
    >>>>> analogous feature: takes a snap when movement is detected. It would
    >>>>> have helped me detect a possum in the roof of a house I was in a while
    >>>>> back. Instead I had to take a low res movie overnight and then scan
    >>>>> the result. No doubt I could have organised to link a motion detector
    >>>>> device to the camera shutter button with a great deal of trouble! <g>
    >>>>
    >>>> For certain Canon Powershot and EOS models there is an open source
    >>>> firmware add-on that provides the capabilities that you are describing
    >>>> and many others. If it doesn't have exactly what you want there's a
    >>>> provision for running your own scripts which may let you add it without
    >>>> too much difficulty.
    >>>>
    >>>> For more information see <http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK>,
    >>>> <http://magiclantern.wikia.com/wiki/Magic_Lantern_Firmware_Wiki>, and
    >>>> <https://code.google.com/p/400plus/>
    >>>
    >>> Where I am now, (on the beautiful Sydney Harbour), there will never be
    >>> a possum problem... but if I ever need motion detection, I will look
    >>> into your links. I have one Canon, a G11 (nice camera, good for low
    >>> light).

    >>
    >> The G11 is supported, although in beta. You might want to check it
    >> out--one thing it's good for is capturing lightning strikes over the
    >> harbor.

    >
    > Right, thanks... so I see at the links you provided. If I ever need
    > the facility again, I will look into this more thoroughly.
    >


    While those scripts usually run well, the update for your camera is
    still in beta. I an not certain I would use a beta update on my camera,
    unless I had a backup camera with me. It's a risk reward type of thing.

    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jul 10, 2013
    #14
  15. dorayme

    PeterN Guest

    On 7/9/2013 8:57 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2013-07-09 17:13:45 -0700, PeterN <> said:
    >
    >> On 7/9/2013 6:32 PM, dorayme wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> "J. Clarke" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In article <>,
    >>>> says...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> In article <>,
    >>>>> "J. Clarke" <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> In article <>,
    >>>>>> says...
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>> ...
    >>>>>>> btw, I have a cheap torch that senses movement in low light and
    >>>>>>> comes
    >>>>>>> on... perhaps consumer level cameras could be made to have an
    >>>>>>> analogous feature: takes a snap when movement is detected. It would
    >>>>>>> have helped me detect a possum in the roof of a house I was in a
    >>>>>>> while
    >>>>>>> back. Instead I had to take a low res movie overnight and then scan
    >>>>>>> the result. No doubt I could have organised to link a motion
    >>>>>>> detector
    >>>>>>> device to the camera shutter button with a great deal of trouble!
    >>>>>>> <g>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> For certain Canon Powershot and EOS models there is an open source
    >>>>>> firmware add-on that provides the capabilities that you are
    >>>>>> describing
    >>>>>> and many others. If it doesn't have exactly what you want there's a
    >>>>>> provision for running your own scripts which may let you add it
    >>>>>> without
    >>>>>> too much difficulty.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> For more information see <http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK>,
    >>>>>> <http://magiclantern.wikia.com/wiki/Magic_Lantern_Firmware_Wiki>, and
    >>>>>> <https://code.google.com/p/400plus/>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Where I am now, (on the beautiful Sydney Harbour), there will never be
    >>>>> a possum problem... but if I ever need motion detection, I will look
    >>>>> into your links. I have one Canon, a G11 (nice camera, good for low
    >>>>> light).
    >>>>
    >>>> The G11 is supported, although in beta. You might want to check it
    >>>> out--one thing it's good for is capturing lightning strikes over the
    >>>> harbor.
    >>>
    >>> Right, thanks... so I see at the links you provided. If I ever need
    >>> the facility again, I will look into this more thoroughly.
    >>>

    >>
    >> While those scripts usually run well, the update for your camera is
    >> still in beta. I an not certain I would use a beta update on my
    >> camera, unless I had a backup camera with me. It's a risk reward type
    >> of thing.

    >
    > It's no risk. Just reset the camera to default and you are back to the
    > factory settings.
    >


    Maybe I don't understand what is happening, According to what I read,
    the download makes changes to the bios. If I screw up a bios update,
    resetting to default won't help.

    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jul 10, 2013
    #15
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  4. Whisky-dave

    Re: Why does the iPhone take such crappy photos?

    Whisky-dave, Jul 9, 2013, in forum: Digital Photography
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    Whisky-dave
    Jul 9, 2013
  5. Howard

    Re: Why does the iPhone take such crappy photos?

    Howard, Jul 9, 2013, in forum: Digital Photography
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    Views:
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    Jul 9, 2013
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