Re: voipcheap & soundcard setup

Discussion in 'UK VOIP' started by {{{{{Welcome}}}}}, Nov 29, 2005.

  1. Thus spaketh Michael Klontzas:
    > I thought I would give voipcheap.co.uk a try and to my surprise I
    > realised that my soundcard, integrated with my motherboard, doesn't
    > have a mic connector! After I changed my motherboard I didn't need a
    > mic until now and it never occurred to me a manufacturer would cut
    > corners by leaving this out! (there is a line-in connector though).
    >
    > So, I am thinking of getting a very cheap soundcard, complete with a
    > mic connector, and get it to run in parallel with my existing
    > soundcard. I would use that just for VoIP apps. As I understand it,
    > I'll simply get more output device options in Windows (right?) but
    > how likely is I'll get a conflict? Then a headset would probably be a
    > good idea. Is there something I am missing here? What sort of sound
    > quality should I expect if it works at all? Has anyone tried them
    > already?
    >
    > TIA


    Why not plug the mic into the line-in?
     
    {{{{{Welcome}}}}}, Nov 29, 2005
    #1
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  2. {{{{{Welcome}}}}}

    Brian A Guest

    On Tue, 29 Nov 2005 04:29:38 GMT, "{{{{{Welcome}}}}}"
    <bhx___spam@trapped___hotmail.co.uk> wrote:

    >Thus spaketh Michael Klontzas:
    >> I thought I would give voipcheap.co.uk a try and to my surprise I
    >> realised that my soundcard, integrated with my motherboard, doesn't
    >> have a mic connector! After I changed my motherboard I didn't need a
    >> mic until now and it never occurred to me a manufacturer would cut
    >> corners by leaving this out! (there is a line-in connector though).
    >>
    >> So, I am thinking of getting a very cheap soundcard, complete with a
    >> mic connector, and get it to run in parallel with my existing
    >> soundcard. I would use that just for VoIP apps. As I understand it,
    >> I'll simply get more output device options in Windows (right?) but
    >> how likely is I'll get a conflict? Then a headset would probably be a
    >> good idea. Is there something I am missing here? What sort of sound
    >> quality should I expect if it works at all? Has anyone tried them
    >> already?
    >>
    >> TIA

    >
    >Why not plug the mic into the line-in?

    Usually because a 'line' input is not sensitive enough for many
    microphones. Originally 'line' implied 1mw, nominally 775mV into 600
    Ohms. Whilst that definition may have wavered it still holds true that
    the line input on many sound cards is of low sensitivity.
    I do know someone, who uses a condenser(capacitor) microphone, who
    upped the polarising voltage to achieve a greater output.



    Remove 'no_spam_' from email address.
     
    Brian A, Nov 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. {{{{{Welcome}}}}}

    Ned Abell Guest

    In article <>,
    Brian A <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 29 Nov 2005 04:29:38 GMT, "{{{{{Welcome}}}}}"
    > <bhx___spam@trapped___hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
    > >Thus spaketh Michael Klontzas:


    [Snip]
    > >> So, I am thinking of getting a very cheap soundcard,
    > >> complete with a mic connector, and get it to run in
    > >> parallel with my existing soundcard. I would use that
    > >> just for VoIP apps. As I understand it, I'll simply get
    > >> more output device options in Windows (right?) but how
    > >> likely is I'll get a conflict? Then a headset would
    > >> probably be a good idea. Is there something I am missing
    > >> here? What sort of sound quality should I expect if it
    > >> works at all? Has anyone tried them already?


    > >
    > >Why not plug the mic into the line-in?

    > Usually because a 'line' input is not sensitive enough for
    > many microphones.


    [Snip]

    Many mic inputs on sound cards also can suffer from electrical
    interference because of poor shielding so consider a USB
    headset as it digitises the sound outside the computer.
    A plantronics one here works well with good sound quality and
    as it configures as another sound device its possible to use
    speakers for music etc and the USB headphones for phone (which
    also leaves the hands free for typing).

    --
    besters
    Ned

    (this email address is unused)
     
    Ned Abell, Nov 29, 2005
    #3
  4. On Tue, 29 Nov 2005 12:06:07 GMT, Brian A wrote:

    > On Tue, 29 Nov 2005 04:29:38 GMT, "{{{{{Welcome}}}}}"
    > <bhx___spam@trapped___hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
    >>Why not plug the mic into the line-in?

    > Usually because a 'line' input is not sensitive enough for many
    > microphones. Originally 'line' implied 1mw, nominally 775mV into 600
    > Ohms. Whilst that definition may have wavered it still holds true that
    > the line input on many sound cards is of low sensitivity.


    That's exactly what I found out when I tried this. The signal was too
    weak. In my case, also the line-in connector is taken by a TV tuner card
    and I hear using a doubler to connect multiple male connectors to a
    female connector is not a good idea with audio.


    X'Posted to: uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
    --
    Michael Klontzas
    Before enlightenment / chopping wood / carrying water
    After enlightenment / chopping wood / carrying water
    Zen Proverb
     
    Michael Klontzas, Nov 29, 2005
    #4
  5. On Tue, 29 Nov 2005 12:25:04 +0000 (GMT), Ned Abell wrote:
    > Many mic inputs on sound cards also can suffer from electrical
    > interference because of poor shielding so consider a USB
    > headset as it digitises the sound outside the computer.
    > A plantronics one here works well with good sound quality and
    > as it configures as another sound device its possible to use
    > speakers for music etc and the USB headphones for phone (which
    > also leaves the hands free for typing).


    It sounds nice (no pun intended). I suppose that a second soundcard
    shouldn't interfere with listening to music either, as it should appear
    as another device. My main concern is cost though. A cheap soundcard
    costs next to nothing. As I see, the entry level Plantronics DSP-100
    costs around £40. To recover the difference through cost saving at
    0.5p/min (the difference between, say, voipcheap and certain callthroughs
    to destinations I am interested in) it will take a looong time!

    This raises another issue. I don't see how the likes of Skype are a
    viable proposition in the UK. They are more expensive than several
    callthroughs or other options, and require software/hardware setup as
    well. Why would someone go down the DIY-VoIP route?


    X'Posted to: uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
    --
    Michael Klontzas
    Before enlightenment / chopping wood / carrying water
    After enlightenment / chopping wood / carrying water
    Zen Proverb
     
    Michael Klontzas, Nov 29, 2005
    #5
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