Re: TrueCrypt & Carbonite

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Ari Silverstein, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. On Sun, 19 Sep 2010 12:57:20 -0700, Prof Wonmug wrote:

    > I recently installed TrueCrypt and have been experimenting with it. I
    > have discovered a couple of by-products or using it with a backup
    > system like Carbonite, which I use.
    >
    > 1. While the drive is mounted, the files are in the clear to all
    > programs running on the machine. Before I realized this, Carbonite,
    > which backs up continuously, had backed up all of the supposedly
    > encrypted files on my test volume. With Carbonite, I am able to
    > designate a volume to be excluded from backup, but I must do this
    > explicitly. This may not be a problem for some people.
    >
    > 2. If the TrueCrypt file is very large (gigabytes), Carbonite excludes
    > it from backup by default. I can override this, but I have to
    > explicitly do it. This is one of the drawbacks of these
    > all-you-can-eat backup systems. They play games to keep you from
    > eating too much.
    >
    > 3. If you change anything on the TrueCrypt volume, the file gets
    > modified and must be completely backed up again -- even if only a few
    > bytes actually changed. If the file is in the GB range, that could
    > take days to back up every time it changes.
    >
    > I don't know any way around any of these.


    If you don't need Truecrypt's plausible deniability (how many do?)
    turn off the "Date Modified" attribute on the file. When the
    attribute is changed as you open up-close your file, Carbonite
    sees backs it up.
    --
    http://tr.im/1fa3
    Ari Silverstein, Sep 19, 2010
    #1
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  2. On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 10:08:07 -0700, Prof Wonmug wrote:

    > On Sun, 19 Sep 2010 17:10:30 -0400, Ari Silverstein
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 19 Sep 2010 12:57:20 -0700, Prof Wonmug wrote:
    >>
    >>> I recently installed TrueCrypt and have been experimenting with it. I
    >>> have discovered a couple of by-products or using it with a backup
    >>> system like Carbonite, which I use.
    >>>
    >>> 1. While the drive is mounted, the files are in the clear to all
    >>> programs running on the machine. Before I realized this, Carbonite,
    >>> which backs up continuously, had backed up all of the supposedly
    >>> encrypted files on my test volume. With Carbonite, I am able to
    >>> designate a volume to be excluded from backup, but I must do this
    >>> explicitly. This may not be a problem for some people.
    >>>
    >>> 2. If the TrueCrypt file is very large (gigabytes), Carbonite excludes
    >>> it from backup by default. I can override this, but I have to
    >>> explicitly do it. This is one of the drawbacks of these
    >>> all-you-can-eat backup systems. They play games to keep you from
    >>> eating too much.
    >>>
    >>> 3. If you change anything on the TrueCrypt volume, the file gets
    >>> modified and must be completely backed up again -- even if only a few
    >>> bytes actually changed. If the file is in the GB range, that could
    >>> take days to back up every time it changes.
    >>>
    >>> I don't know any way around any of these.

    >>
    >>If you don't need Truecrypt's plausible deniability (how many do?)
    >>turn off the "Date Modified" attribute on the file. When the
    >>attribute is changed as you open up-close your file, Carbonite
    >>sees backs it up.

    >
    > I don't understand.
    >
    > a. How does plausible deniability relate to this? I thought it meant
    > using a hidden volume, instead of a file.


    Both and more.

    > b. Do you mean resetting the "Modified" attribute of the TrueCrypt
    > file so that Carbonite will not know that the file has changed and not
    > back it up again?


    The opposite.

    > First of all, I don't want to fool Carbonite into not backing it up.


    Then live with what you have. Replicating information only increases
    your chances of having that information found and uncovered. Backing
    up online exposes you to discovery without any possible knowledge that
    you have been compromised.
    Ari Silverstein, Sep 20, 2010
    #2
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