Re: toward or towards

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Wizard, Mar 13, 2005.

  1. Wizard

    Wizard Guest

    Billy <> wrote:
    > "dwacon" <> wrote in message
    > news:fbQYd.62418$7z6.47411@lakeread04...
    >> Is it "he walked over toward the computer" or is it "he walked over
    >> towards the computer" ???
    >>
    >> The microsoft word grammar checker doesn't complain either way...
    >>

    > Why not simply, "he walked towards the computer" or "he walked over to
    > the computer"?


    Walking towards something is not the same as walking over to something, you
    useless fuckstick.

    Towards implies in the general direction of and does not imply an intent to
    actually end up at the indicated place. Over to implies an intent to
    actually end up at the indicated place, you useless, wet, sperm and shit
    fuckstain on a homosexual's bedsheets.
     
    Wizard, Mar 13, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Wizard

    Billy Guest

    "Wizard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Billy <> wrote:
    > > "dwacon" <> wrote in message
    > > news:fbQYd.62418$7z6.47411@lakeread04...
    > >> Is it "he walked over toward the computer" or is it "he walked over
    > >> towards the computer" ???
    > >>
    > >> The microsoft word grammar checker doesn't complain either way...
    > >>

    > > Why not simply, "he walked towards the computer" or "he walked over

    to
    > > the computer"?

    >
    > Walking towards something is not the same as walking over to

    something, you
    > useless fuckstick.
    >

    Hence the first option I offered/asked about.
    Why use the "over"?

    > Towards implies in the general direction of and does not imply an

    intent to
    > actually end up at the indicated place. Over to implies an intent to
    > actually end up at the indicated place, you useless, wet, sperm and

    shit
    > fuckstain on a homosexual's bedsheets.
    >
     
    Billy, Mar 13, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Wizard

    Wizard Guest

    Billy <> wrote:
    > "Wizard" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Billy <> wrote:
    >>> "dwacon" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:fbQYd.62418$7z6.47411@lakeread04...
    >>>> Is it "he walked over toward the computer" or is it "he walked over
    >>>> towards the computer" ???
    >>>>
    >>>> The microsoft word grammar checker doesn't complain either way...
    >>>>
    >>> Why not simply, "he walked towards the computer" or "he walked over
    >>> to the computer"?

    >>
    >> Walking towards something is not the same as walking over to
    >> something, you useless fuckstick.
    >>

    > Hence the first option I offered/asked about.
    > Why use the "over"?


    Why are you asking me, you fucked in the head ****? It was you who fucking
    well used the phrase, hey. Do you often write things then later have no idea
    why the **** you wrote what you did, you useless fuckbubble?
     
    Wizard, Mar 13, 2005
    #3
  4. Wizard

    Billy Guest

    "Wizard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Billy <> wrote:
    > > "Wizard" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> Billy <> wrote:
    > >>> "dwacon" <> wrote in message
    > >>> news:fbQYd.62418$7z6.47411@lakeread04...
    > >>>> Is it "he walked over toward the computer" or is it "he walked

    over
    > >>>> towards the computer" ???
    > >>>>
    > >>>> The microsoft word grammar checker doesn't complain either way...
    > >>>>
    > >>> Why not simply, "he walked towards the computer" or "he walked

    over
    > >>> to the computer"?
    > >>
    > >> Walking towards something is not the same as walking over to
    > >> something, you useless fuckstick.
    > >>

    > > Hence the first option I offered/asked about.
    > > Why use the "over"?

    >
    > Why are you asking me, you fucked in the head ****? It was you who

    fucking
    > well used the phrase, hey. Do you often write things then later have

    no idea
    > why the **** you wrote what you did, you useless fuckbubble?
    >

    OK obviously you are just being an asshole with no comprehension.
    For your slow mind here it is again.
    Rather than say "he walked over toward the computer", why not say it in
    a straight forward manner as in "he walked towards the computer".
    To complicated, then FOAD.
     
    Billy, Mar 13, 2005
    #4
  5. Wizard

    Wizard Guest

    Billy <> wrote:
    > "Wizard" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Billy <> wrote:
    >>> "Wizard" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Billy <> wrote:
    >>>>> "dwacon" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:fbQYd.62418$7z6.47411@lakeread04...
    >>>>>> Is it "he walked over toward the computer" or is it "he walked
    >>>>>> over towards the computer" ???
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The microsoft word grammar checker doesn't complain either way...
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> Why not simply, "he walked towards the computer" or "he walked
    >>>>> over to the computer"?
    >>>>
    >>>> Walking towards something is not the same as walking over to
    >>>> something, you useless fuckstick.
    >>>>
    >>> Hence the first option I offered/asked about.
    >>> Why use the "over"?

    >>
    >> Why are you asking me, you fucked in the head ****? It was you who
    >> fucking well used the phrase, hey. Do you often write things then
    >> later have no idea why the **** you wrote what you did, you useless
    >> fuckbubble?
    >>

    > OK obviously you are just being an asshole with no comprehension.
    > For your slow mind here it is again.
    > Rather than say "he walked over toward the computer", why not say it
    > in a straight forward manner as in "he walked towards the computer".
    > To complicated, then FOAD.


    Read your own words, chicken fucker.

    'Why not simply, "he walked towards the computer" or "he walked over to the
    computer"?'

    See that two-letter word there, or? Well, that's a conjunction between two
    independent clauses and marks one clause as being an alternative to the
    other.

    So, the choices are either ("why not"):

    1. "he walked towards the computer"

    OR

    2. "he walked over to the computer"

    For the fuckwitted amongst us, that would be you, I will state again:

    Walking towards something is not the same as walking over to something, you
    useless fuckstick.

    Now, you were saying something about comprehension, yes?
     
    Wizard, Mar 14, 2005
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. IGNACIO DE LA TORRE

    CAN I COUNT 70-305 TOWARD BOTH MCSD AND MCDBA?

    IGNACIO DE LA TORRE, Apr 28, 2004, in forum: MCSD
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    427
    Vipul Patel
    Apr 29, 2004
  2. Jim Bayers

    Will 70-216 Count Toward My MCSA?

    Jim Bayers, Jan 26, 2004, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    492
    Forums
    Jan 26, 2004
  3. Jon Anderson

    "Working Toward MCSE"

    Jon Anderson, Apr 20, 2004, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    17
    Views:
    754
    Guest
    Apr 23, 2004
  4. =?Utf-8?B?Tjh3b3Jrcw==?=
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    506
    =?Utf-8?B?Tjh3b3Jrcw==?=
    Nov 15, 2004
  5. dwacon

    toward or towards

    dwacon, Mar 13, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    712
    Wizard
    Mar 14, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page