Re: tough to be a wedding photographer

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Wolfgang Weisselberg, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > Not so true. While not energy efficient it does give a light that's
    > high and above the lens axis and slightly diffuse. This not only gives
    > flattering light but is sure to avoid redeye (most likely with the
    > larger apertures used indoor).


    Redeye is caused by larger apertures and not by relative
    darkness, causing the pupil to dilatate?

    I've only seen redeye in dark circumstances at 10+ meter
    distance using my 550EX (in direct forward flash
    configuration) --- and the photographer is much closer than
    that.

    As for the slightly diffuse light ... how much larger
    is the diffusor over the flash's front lens?

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Jul 14, 2010
    #1
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  2. Wolfgang Weisselberg

    Guest

    On Jul 14, 10:48 am, Wolfgang Weisselberg <>
    wrote:
    > Alan Browne <> wrote:
    > > Not so true.  While not energy efficient it does give a light that's
    > > high and above the lens axis and slightly diffuse.  This not only gives
    > > flattering light but is sure to avoid redeye (most likely with the
    > > larger apertures used indoor).

    >
    > Redeye is caused by larger apertures and not by relative
    > darkness, causing the pupil to dilatate?
    >


    Red eye is caused by the flash going directly to the eyes and back to
    the lens. It is made worse when the pupils are larger, due to low
    light.

    When I photograph cats, the color of the eyes is very important. I
    usually shoot inside an enclosed canopy, so low lighting is
    guaranteed. I set up continuous lighting with the specific purpose of
    keeping the canopy bright enough that the pupils will stay contracted,
    allowing the natural color to really stand out. I use umbrellas to
    keep the light soft enough that the cats do not squint (too bright is
    worse than not bright enough). And then I bounce the flash to get a
    well lit photo without any red eye.
     
    , Jul 15, 2010
    #2
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  3. Wolfgang Weisselberg

    Guest

    On Jul 15, 1:22 pm, George Kerby <> wrote:
    > On 7/15/10 1:53 AM, in article
    > ,
    >
    >
    >
    > "" <> wrote:
    > > On Jul 14, 10:48 am, Wolfgang Weisselberg <>
    > > wrote:
    > >> Alan Browne <> wrote:
    > >>> Not so true.  While not energy efficient it does give a light that's
    > >>> high and above the lens axis and slightly diffuse.  This not only gives
    > >>> flattering light but is sure to avoid redeye (most likely with the
    > >>> larger apertures used indoor).

    >
    > >> Redeye is caused by larger apertures and not by relative
    > >> darkness, causing the pupil to dilatate?

    >
    > > Red eye is caused by the flash going directly to the eyes and back to
    > > the lens. It is made worse when the pupils are larger, due to low
    > > light.

    >
    > > When I photograph cats, the color of the eyes is very important. I
    > > usually shoot inside an enclosed canopy, so low lighting is
    > > guaranteed. I set up continuous lighting with the specific purpose of
    > > keeping the canopy bright enough that the pupils will stay contracted,
    > > allowing the natural color to really stand out. I use umbrellas to
    > > keep the light soft enough that the cats do not squint (too bright is
    > > worse than not bright enough). And then I bounce the flash to get a
    > > well lit photo without any red eye.

    >
    > Speaking of cat lighting, you will appreciate this...
    >
    > <http://tinypic.com/r/2hptaj8/3>


    That is funny!

    Now I need to do one like that intentionally.
     
    , Jul 16, 2010
    #3
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