Re: Tools for rescue kit - USB hard disk?

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Victek, Nov 17, 2007.

  1. Victek

    Victek Guest

    >> I've been assembling various tools for my on-site rescue kit and lately
    >> I've
    >> been thinking about adding an external USB hard disk. In order to rescue
    >> data from an unbootable OS I've been experimenting with BartPE rescue
    >> disks.
    >> Since USB flash drives work in the BartPE environment I wonder if USB
    >> hard
    >> disks are also supported?
    >>
    >> Can you recommend a 100-150 gig USB hard drive? - value, speed,
    >> reliability,
    >> good backup software, etc? Thanks!

    >
    > I am not too sure about a good recomendation for a 100-150 gig drive.
    > I know Western Digital has the myBook 160 GB , I have but got fried
    > durring a power outage. Maxtor is also nice, I used one of these with
    > one of my past jobs. It might be cheaper to buy a hard drive and an
    > enclosure to construct your own. What other things have you included
    > in your kit, as I am trying to put one together also, I figured
    > programs that are usefull that are constantly updating to use a USB
    > Flash drive, and a BartPE rescue disc, screw drivers, pliers, anti-
    > static wrist strap, and tweezers. I figure for a USB Hard Drive I
    > would just try making my own with a drive enclosure.
    >
    > Do you free lance or do you do your computer work for some company, I
    > am considering doing some work on my own so any pointers would be
    > useful


    I do a mix of pure freelance and "on call" work for a couple of companies.
    Look on Craigslist for I.T. work in your area. There are ads for techs
    fairly often where I am. At the beginning you have to be prepared to drive
    a lot (and not get paid for it) and be paid only for the actual time on
    site. There's friends and relatives of course. Word of mouth is a good way
    to slowly build a group of clients, but you have to be disciplined about
    charging for your work and maintaining boundaries - not so easy in my
    experience. If you want something more structured look for gigs at schools,
    non-profits, etc. The pay may not be great, but you will get good
    experience and have more reliable hours.

    As far as tools go my list keeps growing. For freelance work along with the
    things you mentioned I carry a laptop, compressed air (in cans), a
    flashdrive loaded with free antivirus and antispyware applications, a power
    screwdriver (virtually necessary for working on flat-panel TVs, but useful
    for computers too), an extra usb keyboard and usb mouse, usb hub (for
    laptops that have only one usb port), a spare network patch cable, and
    flashlight. I will be getting an external hard drive for fast backups of
    customer data soon, because it is often the case that the customer's OS is
    irreparable due to viruses and spyware and must be formatted/reinstalled.
    You can pretty count on the customer not having any data backed up.

    That's what comes to mind at the moment, but I'm probably forgetting things
    <g>.
    Victek, Nov 17, 2007
    #1
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  2. Victek

    Victek Guest

    >> I am not too sure about a good recomendation for a 100-150 gig drive.
    >> I know Western Digital has the myBook 160 GB , I have but got fried
    >> durring a power outage. Maxtor is also nice, I used one of these with
    >> one of my past jobs. It might be cheaper to buy a hard drive and an
    >> enclosure to construct your own. What other things have you included
    >> in your kit, as I am trying to put one together also, I figured
    >> programs that are usefull that are constantly updating to use a USB
    >> Flash drive, and a BartPE rescue disc, screw drivers, pliers, anti-
    >> static wrist strap, and tweezers. I figure for a USB Hard Drive I
    >> would just try making my own with a drive enclosure.
    >>
    >> Do you free lance or do you do your computer work for some company, I
    >> am considering doing some work on my own so any pointers would be
    >> useful

    >
    > I do a mix of pure freelance and "on call" work for a couple of companies.
    > Look on Craigslist for I.T. work in your area. There are ads for techs
    > fairly often where I am. At the beginning you have to be prepared to
    > drive a lot (and not get paid for it) and be paid only for the actual time
    > on site. There are friends and relatives of course. Word of mouth is a
    > good way to slowly build a group of clients, but you have to be
    > disciplined about charging for your work and maintaining boundaries - not
    > so easy in my experience. If you want something more structured look for
    > gigs at schools, non-profits, etc. The pay may not be great, but you will
    > get good experience and have more reliable hours.
    >
    > As far as tools go my list keeps growing. For freelance work along with
    > the things you mentioned I carry a laptop, compressed air (in cans), a
    > flashdrive loaded with free antivirus and antispyware applications, a
    > power screwdriver (virtually necessary for working on flat-panel TVs, but
    > useful for computers too), an extra usb keyboard and usb mouse, usb hub
    > (for laptops that have only one usb port), a spare network patch cable,
    > and flashlight. I will be getting an external hard drive for fast backups
    > of customer data soon, because it is often the case that the customer's OS
    > is irreparable due to viruses and spyware and must be
    > formatted/reinstalled. You can pretty count on the customer not having any
    > data backed up.
    >
    > That's what comes to mind at the moment, but I'm probably forgetting
    > things <g>.


    I should add that a cell phone with Bluetooth is necessary. That may be
    obvious, but what wasn't obvious to me was how many minutes I would need. I
    had to upgrade my plan to keep from going over each month. I would also
    recommend both a wired and wireless headset. I feel I need to answer calls
    that come in while I'm driving and a wireless headset is the only why to do
    so with reasonable safety. I also use a headset when I need to use the
    phone while working on computers. In that case I use a wired headset
    because the reception is much better (can't deal with the wire while I'm
    driving). Hope this helps - good luck!
    Victek, Nov 17, 2007
    #2
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