Re: Stacked polariser filters instead of ND filters?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by peter, Dec 12, 2010.

  1. peter

    peter Guest

    On 12/11/2010 4:33 PM, Alfred Molon wrote:
    > Would a couple of stacked polariser filters achieve the same effect as
    > an ND filter? Depending on the respective rotation angle it should be
    > possible to reduce the light coming into the camera from 1/16 to almost
    > 0 (each polariser filter reduces incoming light by a factor of 4). Is
    > this correct or am I missing something?
    >
    > The polarised light effect is not a problem by the way. It's just that
    > I'm wondering if I should get a 2-3 ND filters with different light
    > blocking levels or simply an additional polariser filter (I already have
    > one).



    I have done that often. I use a circular polarizer wiith a stacked
    linear polarizer on the outside. It makes a great variable ND filter,
    provided, of course that the polarizing effect won't affect your image.



    --
    Peter
     
    peter, Dec 12, 2010
    #1
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  2. peter

    peter Guest

    On 12/12/2010 9:06 AM, Larry Thong wrote:
    > On Sat, 11 Dec 2010 23:41:15 -0500, peter wrote:
    >
    >>> The polarised light effect is not a problem by the way. It's just that
    >>> I'm wondering if I should get a 2-3 ND filters with different light
    >>> blocking levels or simply an additional polariser filter (I already
    >>> have one).

    >>
    >>
    >> I have done that often. I use a circular polarizer wiith a stacked
    >> linear polarizer on the outside. It makes a great variable ND filter,
    >> provided, of course that the polarizing effect won't affect your image.

    >
    > I use two circular polarizers on my 24/1.4G with great success. I don't
    > believe that a linear polarizer is needed, but I guess that depends on
    > the quality of the polarizers used. The bottom one is a B+W Kaeseman
    > Circular Polarizer with a thinner Nikon on top. A great way to soot that
    > lens wide open on a sunny day. Plus, having two polarizers are more
    > economical and versatile than using a variable ND.


    You may be right about not needing a linear polarizer. But, decent used
    linear polarizers cost about $10 to $15, which is substantially less
    than a good circular polarizer.

    --
    Peter
     
    peter, Dec 13, 2010
    #2
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  3. peter

    Tim Conway Guest

    "peter" <> wrote in message
    news:4d045284$0$5517$-secrets.com...
    > On 12/11/2010 4:33 PM, Alfred Molon wrote:
    >> Would a couple of stacked polariser filters achieve the same effect as
    >> an ND filter? Depending on the respective rotation angle it should be
    >> possible to reduce the light coming into the camera from 1/16 to almost
    >> 0 (each polariser filter reduces incoming light by a factor of 4). Is
    >> this correct or am I missing something?
    >>
    >> The polarised light effect is not a problem by the way. It's just that
    >> I'm wondering if I should get a 2-3 ND filters with different light
    >> blocking levels or simply an additional polariser filter (I already have
    >> one).

    >
    >
    > I have done that often. I use a circular polarizer wiith a stacked linear
    > polarizer on the outside. It makes a great variable ND filter, provided,
    > of course that the polarizing effect won't affect your image.
    >


    It could affect your image like in this photo using a PL on the lens plus
    polarizing material on the subject. :)

    http://www.pbase.com/shootin/image/106545682
     
    Tim Conway, Dec 13, 2010
    #3
  4. peter

    peter Guest

    On 12/12/2010 8:31 PM, Tim Conway wrote:
    >
    > "peter" <> wrote in message
    > news:4d045284$0$5517$-secrets.com...
    >> On 12/11/2010 4:33 PM, Alfred Molon wrote:
    >>> Would a couple of stacked polariser filters achieve the same effect as
    >>> an ND filter? Depending on the respective rotation angle it should be
    >>> possible to reduce the light coming into the camera from 1/16 to almost
    >>> 0 (each polariser filter reduces incoming light by a factor of 4). Is
    >>> this correct or am I missing something?
    >>>
    >>> The polarised light effect is not a problem by the way. It's just that
    >>> I'm wondering if I should get a 2-3 ND filters with different light
    >>> blocking levels or simply an additional polariser filter (I already have
    >>> one).

    >>
    >>
    >> I have done that often. I use a circular polarizer wiith a stacked
    >> linear polarizer on the outside. It makes a great variable ND filter,
    >> provided, of course that the polarizing effect won't affect your image.
    >>

    >
    > It could affect your image like in this photo using a PL on the lens
    > plus polarizing material on the subject. :)
    >
    > http://www.pbase.com/shootin/image/106545682
    >



    It certainly can affect the image. Which is why I put the proviso in my
    statement.

    --
    Peter
     
    peter, Dec 13, 2010
    #4
  5. peter

    Tim Conway Guest

    "peter" <> wrote in message
    news:4d057acf$0$5539$-secrets.com...
    > On 12/12/2010 8:31 PM, Tim Conway wrote:
    >>
    >> "peter" <> wrote in message
    >> news:4d045284$0$5517$-secrets.com...
    >>> On 12/11/2010 4:33 PM, Alfred Molon wrote:
    >>>> Would a couple of stacked polariser filters achieve the same effect as
    >>>> an ND filter? Depending on the respective rotation angle it should be
    >>>> possible to reduce the light coming into the camera from 1/16 to almost
    >>>> 0 (each polariser filter reduces incoming light by a factor of 4). Is
    >>>> this correct or am I missing something?
    >>>>
    >>>> The polarised light effect is not a problem by the way. It's just that
    >>>> I'm wondering if I should get a 2-3 ND filters with different light
    >>>> blocking levels or simply an additional polariser filter (I already
    >>>> have
    >>>> one).
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I have done that often. I use a circular polarizer wiith a stacked
    >>> linear polarizer on the outside. It makes a great variable ND filter,
    >>> provided, of course that the polarizing effect won't affect your image.
    >>>

    >>
    >> It could affect your image like in this photo using a PL on the lens
    >> plus polarizing material on the subject. :)
    >>
    >> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/image/106545682
    >>

    >
    >
    > It certainly can affect the image. Which is why I put the proviso in my
    > statement.
    >

    I know. I just wanted to show off my "medication" photo.
    Polarizers make great ND filters - perfect for waterfalls.
     
    Tim Conway, Dec 13, 2010
    #5
  6. peter

    peter Guest

    On 12/12/2010 11:00 PM, Tim Conway wrote:
    >
    > "peter" <> wrote in message
    > news:4d057acf$0$5539$-secrets.com...
    >> On 12/12/2010 8:31 PM, Tim Conway wrote:
    >>>
    >>> "peter" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:4d045284$0$5517$-secrets.com...
    >>>> On 12/11/2010 4:33 PM, Alfred Molon wrote:
    >>>>> Would a couple of stacked polariser filters achieve the same effect as
    >>>>> an ND filter? Depending on the respective rotation angle it should be
    >>>>> possible to reduce the light coming into the camera from 1/16 to
    >>>>> almost
    >>>>> 0 (each polariser filter reduces incoming light by a factor of 4). Is
    >>>>> this correct or am I missing something?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The polarised light effect is not a problem by the way. It's just that
    >>>>> I'm wondering if I should get a 2-3 ND filters with different light
    >>>>> blocking levels or simply an additional polariser filter (I already
    >>>>> have
    >>>>> one).
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I have done that often. I use a circular polarizer wiith a stacked
    >>>> linear polarizer on the outside. It makes a great variable ND filter,
    >>>> provided, of course that the polarizing effect won't affect your image.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> It could affect your image like in this photo using a PL on the lens
    >>> plus polarizing material on the subject. :)
    >>>
    >>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/image/106545682
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> It certainly can affect the image. Which is why I put the proviso in
    >> my statement.
    >>

    > I know. I just wanted to show off my "medication" photo.
    > Polarizers make great ND filters - perfect for waterfalls.
    >
    >
    >



    <G>

    --
    Peter
     
    peter, Dec 13, 2010
    #6
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