Re: Some different Nikon News

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by David Dyer-Bennet, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. Alan Browne <> writes:

    > On 2012-02-16 19:48 , Savageduck wrote:
    >> I was noodling about on line and came across this regarding Nikon repairs.
    >> < http://ifixit.org/1349/how-nikon-is-killing-camera-repair/ >

    >
    > Regarding the web page above, there were a few ridiculous points, the
    > worse being:
    >
    > QUOTE
    > If you depend on your camera for work, as Jarvie does, having to mail
    > your camera in to be fixed will cost you more than just the price of
    > the repair: lost business, shipping costs, and time lost waiting for
    > the Postal Service to shuttle the camera back and forth.
    > UNQUOTE
    >
    > Really? Does the writer REALLY believe Jarvie has a single camera?


    But absolutely having to have two cameras (or three if you believe you
    need two working ones to take to a gig) is itself a cost, and a rather
    large one.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Feb 17, 2012
    #1
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  2. David Dyer-Bennet

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 19:53:54 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:
    : On 2012-02-17 18:06 , David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    :
    : > But absolutely having to have two cameras (or three if you believe you
    : > need two working ones to take to a gig) is itself a cost, and a rather
    : > large one.
    :
    : I don't know of any pro photog who brings less than 2 cameras to a gig,
    : event, shoot, wedding, etc. His fees depend on taking photos at the
    : time needed, not making excuses about failed eqt. Another commercial
    : photographer nearby always has 3 cameras (sports, medical, etc.).
    : Another brings 2 identical rigs (everything from cameras to lenses to
    : lighting) to every wedding.
    :
    : The capital is depreciated at 20% per year making it a sliver of annual
    : revenue. A couple news photogs I know always have 3 cameras, each with
    : the 1 of the holy trinity lenes mounted. Saves time switching. Those
    : cameras are owned by the paper, however. (Who still lay it off at
    : 20%/year).

    I usually carry two to an event or, say, a building construction tour, where
    it would be hard to stop and change lenses. But I draw the line there. I can't
    really imagine how I'd juggle three.

    I actually think that this may have come up in one of the newsgroups some
    years back and that one of the participants lectured me on how it's possible
    to carry more than two. But I'm afraid I remain unconvinced. Maybe if I were
    thirty years younger, ... :^)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Feb 18, 2012
    #2
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  3. David Dyer-Bennet

    me Guest

    On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 10:02:22 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >I've never carried more than 2 and even that's a PITA. Was really a
    >PITA on film as the "story line" would be broken across different rolls
    >of film. Even with digital the sequencing is not linear v. the events.


    Quite easy to sort/rename etc files via date/timestamp. I don't see
    how this is a real issue. And yes I do use multiple cameras.
     
    me, Feb 18, 2012
    #3
  4. David Dyer-Bennet

    K W Hart Guest

    "Robert Coe" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 19:53:54 -0500, Alan Browne
    > <> wrote:
    > : On 2012-02-17 18:06 , David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > :
    > : > But absolutely having to have two cameras (or three if you believe you
    > : > need two working ones to take to a gig) is itself a cost, and a rather
    > : > large one.
    > :
    > : I don't know of any pro photog who brings less than 2 cameras to a gig,
    > : event, shoot, wedding, etc. His fees depend on taking photos at the
    > : time needed, not making excuses about failed eqt. Another commercial
    > : photographer nearby always has 3 cameras (sports, medical, etc.).
    > : Another brings 2 identical rigs (everything from cameras to lenses to
    > : lighting) to every wedding.
    > :
    > : The capital is depreciated at 20% per year making it a sliver of annual
    > : revenue. A couple news photogs I know always have 3 cameras, each with
    > : the 1 of the holy trinity lenes mounted. Saves time switching. Those
    > : cameras are owned by the paper, however. (Who still lay it off at
    > : 20%/year).
    >
    > I usually carry two to an event or, say, a building construction tour,
    > where
    > it would be hard to stop and change lenses. But I draw the line there. I
    > can't
    > really imagine how I'd juggle three.
    >
    > I actually think that this may have come up in one of the newsgroups some
    > years back and that one of the participants lectured me on how it's
    > possible
    > to carry more than two. But I'm afraid I remain unconvinced. Maybe if I
    > were
    > thirty years younger, ... :^)
    >
    > Bob


    Since my camera is a working tool, I find it a requirement to have and carry
    spares. I shoot the Canon FX (1964-69) 35mm SLR. I have 475 camera bodies
    and over 600 various lenses for them. I think I'm covered for spares!
    Ken
     
    K W Hart, Feb 18, 2012
    #4
  5. David Dyer-Bennet

    Pete A Guest

    On 2012-02-18 17:00:22 +0000, K W Hart said:

    > "Robert Coe" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 19:53:54 -0500, Alan Browne
    >> <> wrote:
    >> : On 2012-02-17 18:06 , David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >> :
    >> : > But absolutely having to have two cameras (or three if you believe you
    >> : > need two working ones to take to a gig) is itself a cost, and a rather
    >> : > large one.
    >> :
    >> : I don't know of any pro photog who brings less than 2 cameras to a gig,
    >> : event, shoot, wedding, etc. His fees depend on taking photos at the
    >> : time needed, not making excuses about failed eqt. Another commercial
    >> : photographer nearby always has 3 cameras (sports, medical, etc.).
    >> : Another brings 2 identical rigs (everything from cameras to lenses to
    >> : lighting) to every wedding.
    >> :
    >> : The capital is depreciated at 20% per year making it a sliver of annual
    >> : revenue. A couple news photogs I know always have 3 cameras, each with
    >> : the 1 of the holy trinity lenes mounted. Saves time switching. Those
    >> : cameras are owned by the paper, however. (Who still lay it off at
    >> : 20%/year).
    >>
    >> I usually carry two to an event or, say, a building construction tour,
    >> where
    >> it would be hard to stop and change lenses. But I draw the line there. I
    >> can't
    >> really imagine how I'd juggle three.
    >>
    >> I actually think that this may have come up in one of the newsgroups some
    >> years back and that one of the participants lectured me on how it's
    >> possible
    >> to carry more than two. But I'm afraid I remain unconvinced. Maybe if I
    >> were
    >> thirty years younger, ... :^)
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    > Since my camera is a working tool, I find it a requirement to have and carry
    > spares. I shoot the Canon FX (1964-69) 35mm SLR. I have 475 camera bodies
    > and over 600 various lenses for them. I think I'm covered for spares!


    I guess you won't be switching to Nikon in the near future.
     
    Pete A, Feb 18, 2012
    #5
  6. David Dyer-Bennet

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 10:02:22 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:
    : I've never carried more than 2 [cameras] and even that's a PITA.
    : Was really a PITA on film as the "story line" would be broken
    : across different rolls of film. Even with digital the sequencing
    : is not linear v. the events.

    The current version of Canon's "EOS Utility" lets you synchronize a camera's
    time with that of your computer. So before a shoot you can set all the cameras
    you might use to the exact same time. Then when you sort all the pictures by
    shooting time and then rename, the sequencing will be correct. Don't know
    whether all the manufacturers' SW allows that, but they usually follow each
    other pretty closely in such matters.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Feb 18, 2012
    #6
  7. Alan Browne <> writes:

    > On 2012-02-18 10:46 , me wrote:
    >> On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 10:02:22 -0500, Alan Browne
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've never carried more than 2 and even that's a PITA. Was really a
    >>> PITA on film as the "story line" would be broken across different rolls
    >>> of film. Even with digital the sequencing is not linear v. the events.

    >>
    >> Quite easy to sort/rename etc files via date/timestamp. I don't see
    >> how this is a real issue. And yes I do use multiple cameras.

    >
    > Where did I say that couldn't be done?
    >
    > What can't be done (conveniently) is frame numbering per the order of
    > the events. (In Bridge IAC).


    Yes, that's a problem with all the automatic import systems. That's why
    I never use any of them (that and I'm afraid of them; too many people
    report losing files that way, I've never lost a file once it got onto
    the card okay).
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Feb 20, 2012
    #7
  8. David Dyer-Bennet

    nick c Guest

    Alan Browne wrote:
    > Snip
    >
    > I've never carried more than 2 and even that's a PITA.
    >


    It's been my habit, when shooting difficult areas such as in Ghost
    Towns, abandoned buildings, or harbor scenes, etc... I generally carry
    two Nikon cameras. To limit my equipment, a 17-35 f2.8 lens goes on the
    D700 and a 24-120 f4 lens goes on the D300. A belly-pack is used to
    carry favored 77mm filters and a flash with an accessory extension cable.

    Yes, it has been a PITA at times, in fact more times than not because
    they are heavy, but when culling my shots the inconvenience once felt
    seems to fade way. If I were a lot younger, I probably would carry my bag.
     
    nick c, Feb 24, 2012
    #8
  9. David Dyer-Bennet

    PeterN Guest

    On 2/23/2012 7:19 PM, nick c wrote:
    > Alan Browne wrote:
    >> Snip
    >>
    >> I've never carried more than 2 and even that's a PITA.

    >
    > It's been my habit, when shooting difficult areas such as in Ghost
    > Towns, abandoned buildings, or harbor scenes, etc... I generally carry
    > two Nikon cameras. To limit my equipment, a 17-35 f2.8 lens goes on the
    > D700 and a 24-120 f4 lens goes on the D300. A belly-pack is used to
    > carry favored 77mm filters and a flash with an accessory extension cable.
    >
    > Yes, it has been a PITA at times, in fact more times than not because
    > they are heavy, but when culling my shots the inconvenience once felt
    > seems to fade way. If I were a lot younger, I probably would carry my bag.
    >
    >
    >

    I know the feeling. I carry two Nikons using a Black Rapid R strap. It's
    seems easier to carry two with that strap, than just one.

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Feb 25, 2012
    #9
  10. David Dyer-Bennet

    nick c Guest

    PeterN wrote:
    > On 2/23/2012 7:19 PM, nick c wrote:
    >> Alan Browne wrote:
    >>> Snip
    >>>
    >>> I've never carried more than 2 and even that's a PITA.

    >>
    >> It's been my habit, when shooting difficult areas such as in Ghost
    >> Towns, abandoned buildings, or harbor scenes, etc... I generally carry
    >> two Nikon cameras. To limit my equipment, a 17-35 f2.8 lens goes on the
    >> D700 and a 24-120 f4 lens goes on the D300. A belly-pack is used to
    >> carry favored 77mm filters and a flash with an accessory extension cable.
    >>
    >> Yes, it has been a PITA at times, in fact more times than not because
    >> they are heavy, but when culling my shots the inconvenience once felt
    >> seems to fade way. If I were a lot younger, I probably would carry my
    >> bag.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > I know the feeling. I carry two Nikons using a Black Rapid R strap. It's
    > seems easier to carry two with that strap, than just one.
    >


    I didn't know (by brand name) what a Black Rapid R strap looked like so
    I look it up and found the following. Look at the last picture of the
    girl with two cameras. Does that rig look like the rig you use? My
    cameras have battery packs and quick release plates attached to the
    bottom of the battery packs. I've never run out of power and I often use
    one of two lightweight tripods. I've found readily affixed quick release
    plates to be a speedy tripod setup advantage.

    It looks like the illustration shows the cameras are being carried
    upside down. I guess I have to see one of those rigs to see if I would
    be comfortable using such a strap and still keep my camera setups.

    Thanks for telling me what you use.

    http://www.ppmag.com/web-exclusives/2009/10/review-blackrapid-r-strap.html

    What I have been using are two cameras slung around the neck and
    shoulder (like bandoleers) with each camera draped at my sides. I tie a
    separate chord around the midriff keeping each camera in place at each
    side until they are being used. It may not look good but it seems to
    work fairly well. If I were to complain about anything it would surely
    be weight.

    Again, thanks for the insight.
     
    nick c, Feb 25, 2012
    #10
  11. David Dyer-Bennet

    me Guest

    On Fri, 24 Feb 2012 19:12:30 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:


    >I also recommend the Black Rapid Strap. Use one and you will wonder
    >where the pain from hanging a DSLR around your neck went. I use the
    >RS-4 carrying one D300s. The only hassle is having to undo the fastener
    >from the tripod socket for tripod use. I usually just carry a QR plate
    >in my pocket and switch if I need to use a tripod.
    >
    >The camera hangs upside down, but can be brought into play very quickly
    >from that position.
    >< http://www.blackrapid.com/product/camera-strap/rs-7/ >


    FWIW, I've been trying one for 14 months now and am not totally
    pleased with it. I'm using it with a D200/D300 and the 18-200mm and
    70-200 f/2.8 lenses. In both cases I find the camera and lens bounces
    and swings around too much. The 18-200mm is the worse of the two as I
    find the lens bounces against my body and it unlatches the catch which
    keeps the lens from extending as I walk. I agree that it's great for
    the quickness it allows to bring the camera into shooting position.
    Previously I've used the Nikon straps or two different LowePro straps
    set to their utmost length and carried the cameras cross body ala the
    Black Rapid strap but with the camera body turned into my body. This
    provided a more secure posture of the camera from walking/hiking at
    the expense of ease of bringing up to shooting position.

    For the 200-400mm f/4 I'm still using the Nikon strap attached to the
    lens. I walked almost three hours this morning with that mounted on
    the D300 over one shoulder while the D200/18-200 on the RS-7 was over
    the other. I needed a fair dose of ibuprofen when I got back home.
     
    me, Feb 25, 2012
    #11
  12. David Dyer-Bennet

    PeterN Guest

    On 2/24/2012 9:47 PM, nick c wrote:
    > PeterN wrote:
    >> On 2/23/2012 7:19 PM, nick c wrote:
    >>> Alan Browne wrote:
    >>>> Snip
    >>>>
    >>>> I've never carried more than 2 and even that's a PITA.
    >>>
    >>> It's been my habit, when shooting difficult areas such as in Ghost
    >>> Towns, abandoned buildings, or harbor scenes, etc... I generally carry
    >>> two Nikon cameras. To limit my equipment, a 17-35 f2.8 lens goes on the
    >>> D700 and a 24-120 f4 lens goes on the D300. A belly-pack is used to
    >>> carry favored 77mm filters and a flash with an accessory extension
    >>> cable.
    >>>
    >>> Yes, it has been a PITA at times, in fact more times than not because
    >>> they are heavy, but when culling my shots the inconvenience once felt
    >>> seems to fade way. If I were a lot younger, I probably would carry my
    >>> bag.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> I know the feeling. I carry two Nikons using a Black Rapid R strap.
    >> It's seems easier to carry two with that strap, than just one.
    >>

    >
    > I didn't know (by brand name) what a Black Rapid R strap looked like so
    > I look it up and found the following. Look at the last picture of the
    > girl with two cameras. Does that rig look like the rig you use? My
    > cameras have battery packs and quick release plates attached to the
    > bottom of the battery packs. I've never run out of power and I often use
    > one of two lightweight tripods. I've found readily affixed quick release
    > plates to be a speedy tripod setup advantage.
    >
    > It looks like the illustration shows the cameras are being carried
    > upside down. I guess I have to see one of those rigs to see if I would
    > be comfortable using such a strap and still keep my camera setups.
    >
    > Thanks for telling me what you use.
    >
    > http://www.ppmag.com/web-exclusives/2009/10/review-blackrapid-r-strap.html
    >
    > What I have been using are two cameras slung around the neck and
    > shoulder (like bandoleers) with each camera draped at my sides. I tie a
    > separate chord around the midriff keeping each camera in place at each
    > side until they are being used. It may not look good but it seems to
    > work fairly well. If I were to complain about anything it would surely
    > be weight.
    >
    > Again, thanks for the insight.
    >
    >


    The R strap attaches to the tripod socket. With telephotos this is not
    an issue as I mount camera on the tripod using the collar on the lens.
    With the W/A I have to unscrew it. That is a bit of a pain, but a
    reasonable compromise.




    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Feb 25, 2012
    #12
  13. David Dyer-Bennet

    nick c Guest

    PeterN wrote:
    > On 2/24/2012 9:47 PM, nick c wrote:
    >> PeterN wrote:
    >>> On 2/23/2012 7:19 PM, nick c wrote:
    >>>> Alan Browne wrote:
    >>>>> Snip
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I've never carried more than 2 and even that's a PITA.
    >>>>
    >>>> It's been my habit, when shooting difficult areas such as in Ghost
    >>>> Towns, abandoned buildings, or harbor scenes, etc... I generally carry
    >>>> two Nikon cameras. To limit my equipment, a 17-35 f2.8 lens goes on the
    >>>> D700 and a 24-120 f4 lens goes on the D300. A belly-pack is used to
    >>>> carry favored 77mm filters and a flash with an accessory extension
    >>>> cable.
    >>>>
    >>>> Yes, it has been a PITA at times, in fact more times than not because
    >>>> they are heavy, but when culling my shots the inconvenience once felt
    >>>> seems to fade way. If I were a lot younger, I probably would carry my
    >>>> bag.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> I know the feeling. I carry two Nikons using a Black Rapid R strap.
    >>> It's seems easier to carry two with that strap, than just one.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I didn't know (by brand name) what a Black Rapid R strap looked like so
    >> I look it up and found the following. Look at the last picture of the
    >> girl with two cameras. Does that rig look like the rig you use? My
    >> cameras have battery packs and quick release plates attached to the
    >> bottom of the battery packs. I've never run out of power and I often use
    >> one of two lightweight tripods. I've found readily affixed quick release
    >> plates to be a speedy tripod setup advantage.
    >>
    >> It looks like the illustration shows the cameras are being carried
    >> upside down. I guess I have to see one of those rigs to see if I would
    >> be comfortable using such a strap and still keep my camera setups.
    >>
    >> Thanks for telling me what you use.
    >>
    >> http://www.ppmag.com/web-exclusives/2009/10/review-blackrapid-r-strap.html
    >>
    >>
    >> What I have been using are two cameras slung around the neck and
    >> shoulder (like bandoleers) with each camera draped at my sides. I tie a
    >> separate chord around the midriff keeping each camera in place at each
    >> side until they are being used. It may not look good but it seems to
    >> work fairly well. If I were to complain about anything it would surely
    >> be weight.
    >>
    >> Again, thanks for the insight.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > The R strap attaches to the tripod socket. With telephotos this is not
    > an issue as I mount camera on the tripod using the collar on the lens.
    > With the W/A I have to unscrew it. That is a bit of a pain, but a
    > reasonable compromise.
    >
    >


    When I first saw the strap attaches to the camera body by the tripod
    socket, and the possibility of both cameras somewhat freely dangling at
    my side, that bothered me. When using a tripod, at a point during a
    tripod/camera setup, the camera would be unsecured from me. Although my
    long lens has a tripod collar I don't often use that lens. The lens I
    most often use is the 17-35mm f2.8.

    Although I don't post pictures anymore, I did a search and found
    pbase.com still shows some examples of my old photo's. The site shows
    old shots taken when I was primarily using Canon equipment. I've long
    since sold all my Canon gear and have gone Nikon. These pictures will
    show you the type of photo's I'm generally interested in taking.

    When I saw these posted photo's I was taken-back by the seemingly loss
    of color tone that has occurred since they were posted. When compared
    with my duplicate stock photo's, my stock photo's appear to be more
    color enhanced and sharper than what may be seen in the posted pictures.
    My guess is the posted pictures /may/ have been severely compressed. I
    have long since ceased maintaining the site.

    http://www.pbase.com/nchen711

    Getting back to the camera rig, I will see if my local camera store has
    such a type rig in stock.
     
    nick c, Feb 25, 2012
    #13
  14. David Dyer-Bennet

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 26 Feb 2012 10:35:36 +1300, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 25 Feb 2012 08:08:13 -0800, Savageduck
    ><savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >
    >>On 2012-02-25 07:17:53 -0800, Alan Browne
    >><> said:
    >>
    >>> On 2012-02-24 22:12 , Savageduck wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Another option for the active outdoor photographer is the Cotton Carrier
    >>>> system. I have not used it myself, but I know some who use it and find
    >>>> it indispensable for their purposes.
    >>>> < http://www.cottoncarrier.com/ >
    >>>
    >>> Looks a bit overdone to me - esp. the 'vest' version.

    >>
    >>Agreed. It is not for me, it clashes with my sense of fashion, but
    >>there are those who swear by it.
    >>
    >>...and you still have the issue of the tripod socket in use by the
    >>carrying system. I understand that a few the active rock climbing
    >>photographers have adopted it, not much need for a tripod for some of
    >>those folks up on El Cap.

    >
    >See
    >http://www.soygik.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/900089074_04c6e4c668.jpg
    >
    >Regards,


    I've always been fairly adventurous, but there are two things I would
    never consider doing: rock face climbing and cave diving. Heights
    don't bother me, but being suspended would. I scuba dive, but I want
    to see the way out.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 25, 2012
    #14
  15. David Dyer-Bennet

    PeterN Guest

    On 2/25/2012 4:27 PM, nick c wrote:



    <SNIO>>>
    >>

    >
    > When I first saw the strap attaches to the camera body by the tripod
    > socket, and the possibility of both cameras somewhat freely dangling at
    > my side, that bothered me. When using a tripod, at a point during a
    > tripod/camera setup, the camera would be unsecured from me. Although my
    > long lens has a tripod collar I don't often use that lens. The lens I
    > most often use is the 17-35mm f2.8.
    >
    > Although I don't post pictures anymore, I did a search and found
    > pbase.com still shows some examples of my old photo's. The site shows
    > old shots taken when I was primarily using Canon equipment. I've long
    > since sold all my Canon gear and have gone Nikon. These pictures will
    > show you the type of photo's I'm generally interested in taking.
    >
    > When I saw these posted photo's I was taken-back by the seemingly loss
    > of color tone that has occurred since they were posted. When compared
    > with my duplicate stock photo's, my stock photo's appear to be more
    > color enhanced and sharper than what may be seen in the posted pictures.
    > My guess is the posted pictures /may/ have been severely compressed. I
    > have long since ceased maintaining the site.
    >
    > http://www.pbase.com/nchen711


    Looks like you enjoy photography. Y Our images are nice recordings of
    places you've been. Image # 3 at the Marina reminds me of a setting in a
    Clint Eastwood movie. Don't remember which one.


    I doubt that digital images would fade the way you describe. Could yo
    have gotten a brighter monitor?


    >
    > Getting back to the camera rig, I will see if my local camera store has
    > such a type rig in stock.






    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Feb 26, 2012
    #15
  16. David Dyer-Bennet

    Pete A Guest

    On 2012-02-26 20:02:52 +0000, PeterN said:

    > On 2/25/2012 4:27 PM, nick c wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > <SNIO>>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> When I first saw the strap attaches to the camera body by the tripod
    >> socket, and the possibility of both cameras somewhat freely dangling at
    >> my side, that bothered me. When using a tripod, at a point during a
    >> tripod/camera setup, the camera would be unsecured from me. Although my
    >> long lens has a tripod collar I don't often use that lens. The lens I
    >> most often use is the 17-35mm f2.8.
    >>
    >> Although I don't post pictures anymore, I did a search and found
    >> pbase.com still shows some examples of my old photo's. The site shows
    >> old shots taken when I was primarily using Canon equipment. I've long
    >> since sold all my Canon gear and have gone Nikon. These pictures will
    >> show you the type of photo's I'm generally interested in taking.
    >>
    >> When I saw these posted photo's I was taken-back by the seemingly loss
    >> of color tone that has occurred since they were posted. When compared
    >> with my duplicate stock photo's, my stock photo's appear to be more
    >> color enhanced and sharper than what may be seen in the posted pictures.
    >> My guess is the posted pictures /may/ have been severely compressed. I
    >> have long since ceased maintaining the site.
    >>
    >> http://www.pbase.com/nchen711

    >
    > Looks like you enjoy photography. Y Our images are nice recordings of
    > places you've been. Image # 3 at the Marina reminds me of a setting in
    > a Clint Eastwood movie. Don't remember which one.
    >
    >
    > I doubt that digital images would fade the way you describe. Could yo
    > have gotten a brighter monitor?


    Just a thought: I downloaded one of Nick's images and noticed it has no
    ICC profile. If the originals were sRGB images then there should be no
    colour difference in any web browser other than Safari, which for some
    idiotic reason assigns the Monitor Profile to untagged images rather
    than sRGB. If the originals weren't sRGB images then problem solved.
     
    Pete A, Feb 26, 2012
    #16
  17. David Dyer-Bennet

    PeterN Guest

    On 2/25/2012 5:07 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    > On Sun, 26 Feb 2012 10:35:36 +1300, Eric Stevens
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 25 Feb 2012 08:08:13 -0800, Savageduck
    >> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2012-02-25 07:17:53 -0800, Alan Browne
    >>> <> said:
    >>>
    >>>> On 2012-02-24 22:12 , Savageduck wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Another option for the active outdoor photographer is the Cotton Carrier
    >>>>> system. I have not used it myself, but I know some who use it and find
    >>>>> it indispensable for their purposes.
    >>>>> < http://www.cottoncarrier.com/>
    >>>>
    >>>> Looks a bit overdone to me - esp. the 'vest' version.
    >>>
    >>> Agreed. It is not for me, it clashes with my sense of fashion, but
    >>> there are those who swear by it.
    >>>
    >>> ...and you still have the issue of the tripod socket in use by the
    >>> carrying system. I understand that a few the active rock climbing
    >>> photographers have adopted it, not much need for a tripod for some of
    >>> those folks up on El Cap.

    >>
    >> See
    >> http://www.soygik.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/900089074_04c6e4c668.jpg
    >>
    >> Regards,

    >
    > I've always been fairly adventurous, but there are two things I would
    > never consider doing: rock face climbing and cave diving. Heights
    > don't bother me, but being suspended would. I scuba dive, but I want
    > to see the way out.
    >
    >



    One former, and younger dive buddy of mine gave up his business in NY
    and opened a dive shop in Bonaire. We had lost touch, but several years
    ago he was leading a cave diving expedition on a PBS special.

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Feb 26, 2012
    #17
  18. David Dyer-Bennet

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 26 Feb 2012 15:47:41 -0500, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >On 2/25/2012 5:07 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    >> On Sun, 26 Feb 2012 10:35:36 +1300, Eric Stevens
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 25 Feb 2012 08:08:13 -0800, Savageduck
    >>> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 2012-02-25 07:17:53 -0800, Alan Browne
    >>>> <> said:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On 2012-02-24 22:12 , Savageduck wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Another option for the active outdoor photographer is the Cotton Carrier
    >>>>>> system. I have not used it myself, but I know some who use it and find
    >>>>>> it indispensable for their purposes.
    >>>>>> < http://www.cottoncarrier.com/>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Looks a bit overdone to me - esp. the 'vest' version.
    >>>>
    >>>> Agreed. It is not for me, it clashes with my sense of fashion, but
    >>>> there are those who swear by it.
    >>>>
    >>>> ...and you still have the issue of the tripod socket in use by the
    >>>> carrying system. I understand that a few the active rock climbing
    >>>> photographers have adopted it, not much need for a tripod for some of
    >>>> those folks up on El Cap.
    >>>
    >>> See
    >>> http://www.soygik.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/900089074_04c6e4c668.jpg
    >>>
    >>> Regards,

    >>
    >> I've always been fairly adventurous, but there are two things I would
    >> never consider doing: rock face climbing and cave diving. Heights
    >> don't bother me, but being suspended would. I scuba dive, but I want
    >> to see the way out.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >One former, and younger dive buddy of mine gave up his business in NY
    >and opened a dive shop in Bonaire. We had lost touch, but several years
    >ago he was leading a cave diving expedition on a PBS special.


    I took my family to Bonaire over the New Year holiday one year. My
    son and I were scuba divers, and my daughter got her first taste of it
    there. I took her down about 10 feet using my spare air line, and she
    started scuba lessons the week we got back.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 26, 2012
    #18
  19. In rec.photo.digital tony cooper <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 26 Feb 2012 10:35:36 +1300, Eric Stevens
    > <> wrote:


    >>On Sat, 25 Feb 2012 08:08:13 -0800, Savageduck
    >><savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On 2012-02-25 07:17:53 -0800, Alan Browne
    >>><> said:
    >>>
    >>>> On 2012-02-24 22:12 , Savageduck wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Another option for the active outdoor photographer is the Cotton Carrier
    >>>>> system. I have not used it myself, but I know some who use it and find
    >>>>> it indispensable for their purposes.
    >>>>> < http://www.cottoncarrier.com/ >
    >>>>
    >>>> Looks a bit overdone to me - esp. the 'vest' version.
    >>>
    >>>Agreed. It is not for me, it clashes with my sense of fashion, but
    >>>there are those who swear by it.
    >>>
    >>>...and you still have the issue of the tripod socket in use by the
    >>>carrying system. I understand that a few the active rock climbing
    >>>photographers have adopted it, not much need for a tripod for some of
    >>>those folks up on El Cap.

    >>
    >>See
    >>http://www.soygik.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/900089074_04c6e4c668.jpg
    >>
    >>Regards,


    > I've always been fairly adventurous, but there are two things I would
    > never consider doing: rock face climbing and cave diving. Heights
    > don't bother me, but being suspended would. I scuba dive, but I want
    > to see the way out.


    If you're suspended on a long enough rope there are always two visible
    ways out -- abseiling down the rope, or climbing up it (using
    ascenders of your preferred kind which of course you always carry when
    being suspended).

    --
    Chris Malcolm
     
    Chris Malcolm, Feb 27, 2012
    #19
  20. David Dyer-Bennet

    tony cooper Guest

    On 27 Feb 2012 01:05:46 GMT, Chris Malcolm <>
    wrote:

    >In rec.photo.digital tony cooper <> wrote:
    >> On Sun, 26 Feb 2012 10:35:36 +1300, Eric Stevens
    >> <> wrote:

    >
    >>>On Sat, 25 Feb 2012 08:08:13 -0800, Savageduck
    >>><savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On 2012-02-25 07:17:53 -0800, Alan Browne
    >>>><> said:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On 2012-02-24 22:12 , Savageduck wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Another option for the active outdoor photographer is the Cotton Carrier
    >>>>>> system. I have not used it myself, but I know some who use it and find
    >>>>>> it indispensable for their purposes.
    >>>>>> < http://www.cottoncarrier.com/ >
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Looks a bit overdone to me - esp. the 'vest' version.
    >>>>
    >>>>Agreed. It is not for me, it clashes with my sense of fashion, but
    >>>>there are those who swear by it.
    >>>>
    >>>>...and you still have the issue of the tripod socket in use by the
    >>>>carrying system. I understand that a few the active rock climbing
    >>>>photographers have adopted it, not much need for a tripod for some of
    >>>>those folks up on El Cap.
    >>>
    >>>See
    >>>http://www.soygik.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/900089074_04c6e4c668.jpg
    >>>
    >>>Regards,

    >
    >> I've always been fairly adventurous, but there are two things I would
    >> never consider doing: rock face climbing and cave diving. Heights
    >> don't bother me, but being suspended would. I scuba dive, but I want
    >> to see the way out.

    >
    >If you're suspended on a long enough rope there are always two visible
    >ways out -- abseiling down the rope, or climbing up it (using
    >ascenders of your preferred kind which of course you always carry when
    >being suspended).


    You know what they say about "Give a man enough rope...".

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 27, 2012
    #20
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