Re: Some Comments for U.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tony cooper, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 12:17:47 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >On 2012-02-18 12:16 , Savageduck wrote:
    >> On 2012-02-18 09:06:08 -0800, Alan Browne
    >> <> said:
    >>
    >>> On 2012-02-13 19:41 , Bowser wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/image/141444630
    >>>> Nice colors! An Umbrella, obvously, but a nice combination of red and
    >>>> blue, with a nice transition between the two. Nicely lit.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/image/141444629
    >>>> Another Umbrella, more good colors. The composition suits the colors;
    >>>> works well for me.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks.
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/image/141444628
    >>>> Utensils. I didn't think of this. You know what would have been nice?
    >>>> A reflection of an Umbrella in the Utensils. Did you light these three
    >>>> shots with strobe Umbrellas?
    >>>
    >>> Yes. I tried various ways to get a good reflection of the umbrellas in
    >>> there, but didn't come up with anything remotely satisfying. I've
    >>> deleted them too. I did take some interesting photos of utensils in
    >>> San Andres a couple years ago. The outdoor lunch tent had a blue cloth
    >>> roof. The colour in the utensils was interesting.
    >>>

    >
    >Here: http://www.dropbox.com/gallery/62816810/1/Utes?h=450b28


    For years I've been collecting sterling silver "utensils" ("flatware"
    to me), as you call them, and other sterling dinnerware items. A few
    years ago I started selling off my collection on eBay.

    They are a bitch to photograph...especially spoons. The bowl of the
    spoon reflects the surroundings and the camera's lens. I used a
    home-made light box made from a translucent lampshade with a
    translucent sheet of plastic over the top and a hole cut in it for the
    lens. It was also hard get a good image of the sterling maker's mark
    since the camera I had then didn't have good macro ability.





    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Feb 18, 2012
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    Pete A Guest

    On 2012-02-19 03:48:09 +0000, Eric Stevens said:

    > On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 19:10:15 -0800, Paul Furman <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Eric Stevens wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 18:29:09 -0500, Alan Browne
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 2012-02-18 17:44 , Eric Stevens wrote:
    >>>>> On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 15:27:51 -0500, Alan Browne
    >>>>
    >>>>>> Curved, reflective surfaces are always a photographic opportunity. But
    >>>>>> they do catch everything wildly outside the field and that gives more
    >>>>>> headache than opportunity in most cases.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> You mean like http://dl.dropbox.com/u/31088803/Ventilator 2.jpg ?

    >>
    >>
    >> Ha, there's two faces hiding in there: one upside down, the other of the
    >> same person I guess

    >
    > I took the photograph against a background of a large sheet of plain
    > whit drawing paper. The ventilators sat on the paper and my wife held
    > it up at the back. Both the top of the paper and my wife were out of
    > the field of view, weren't they? Weren't they?


    Nope.

    > This is worse than having the photographer's shadow in the picture.
    > With objects like this you get everything in the picture and there is
    > no way of avoiding it.
    Pete A, Feb 19, 2012
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    Pete A Guest

    On 2012-02-19 08:53:15 +0000, Savageduck said:

    > On 2012-02-19 00:03:49 -0800, Pete A <> said:
    >
    >> On 2012-02-19 06:49:50 +0000, Savageduck said:
    >>
    >>> On 2012-02-18 12:27:51 -0800, Alan Browne
    >>> <> said:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> In French the word is "Ustensils" so using the English "utensils" is
    >>>> more common in Frenglish here in Quebec.
    >>>
    >>> "Ustensils", French?
    >>>
    >>> i believe a check will reveal that "utensil" is late Middle English,
    >>> and is derived from the Old French "utensile", which came from the
    >>> medieval Latin neuter form of "utensilis", meaning usable, from "uti"
    >>> to use.
    >>> Originally a collective term for domestic implements or containers.

    >>
    >> Un ustensile; ustensiles de table; ustensiles de cuisine.

    >
    > However if you actually check a dictionary for the origins of the word,
    > utensil "u-s-t-e-n-s-i-l-e-s" is not mentioned, but "u-t-e-n-s-i-l-e"
    > is.
    > ...and I guess Old French came along way before whatever created that
    > odd 3 "S" spelling.


    Sorry, I sent the post instead of saving it.

    I found it interesting that "utensiles" is not mentioned.

    It seems the word "utensile" was introduced around the mid 1300's and
    "us..." was a much later corruption, but I can't find when it first
    appeared neither can I find a date for "utensiles".
    Pete A, Feb 19, 2012
    #3
  4. On 2/19/2012 9:13 AM, Alan Browne wrote:
    > On 2012-02-19 01:49 , Savageduck wrote:
    >> On 2012-02-18 12:27:51 -0800, Alan Browne
    >> <> said:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> In French the word is "Ustensils" so using the English "utensils" is
    >>> more common in Frenglish here in Quebec.

    >>
    >> "Ustensils", French?

    >
    > Yes. But spelled correctly is ustensile. (I get to screw up too)
    >
    >>
    >> i believe a check will reveal that "utensil" is late Middle English, and
    >> is derived from the Old French "utensile", which came from the medieval
    >> Latin neuter form of "utensilis", meaning usable, from "uti" to use.
    >> Originally a collective term for domestic implements or containers.

    >
    > If you say so. Ustensile is modern French.
    >
    >

    By heaven, it really is ustensile; whoda thunk it? An illusion
    shattered! According the online Oxford English Dictionary, Old French
    had utensile but they changed in the 14th century.

    --
    Jim Silverton

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
    James Silverton, Feb 19, 2012
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 2/19/2012 1:49 AM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2012-02-18 12:27:51 -0800, Alan Browne
    > <> said:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> In French the word is "Ustensils" so using the English "utensils" is
    >> more common in Frenglish here in Quebec.

    >
    > "Ustensils", French?
    >
    > i believe a check will reveal that "utensil" is late Middle English, and
    > is derived from the Old French "utensile", which came from the medieval
    > Latin neuter form of "utensilis", meaning usable, from "uti" to use.
    > Originally a collective term for domestic implements or containers.
    >
    >

    A check reveals the amount I should put on my deposit slip.>


    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Feb 19, 2012
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 2/18/2012 8:58 PM, Eric Stevens wrote:
    > On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 18:29:09 -0500, Alan Browne
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2012-02-18 17:44 , Eric Stevens wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 15:27:51 -0500, Alan Browne

    >>
    >>>> Curved, reflective surfaces are always a photographic opportunity. But
    >>>> they do catch everything wildly outside the field and that gives more
    >>>> headache than opportunity in most cases.
    >>>
    >>> You mean like http://dl.dropbox.com/u/31088803/Ventilator 2.jpg ?
    >>>>

    >>
    >> Perfect. Next time look like a pro and support the lens with your left
    >> hand under the lens. ;-)
    >>
    >> (What are these? Some sort of light fixture or air intake for a boat?
    >> (I always guess wrong...)).

    >
    > Your second guess is correct. Very expensive stainless steel cast by
    > the lost wax process.
    >


    You like to keep things ship shape.

    BTW that was my guess too.
    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Feb 19, 2012
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    Pete A Guest

    On 2012-02-19 18:22:42 +0000, George Kerby said:

    > On 2/19/12 12:09 PM, in article
    > 2012021918092372655-pete3attkins@nospamntlworldcom, "Pete A"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2012-02-19 17:19:25 +0000, Alan Browne said:
    >>
    >>> On 2012-02-19 11:24 , Savageduck wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Just like those modern French, adding style "esses" where they aren't
    >>>> needed.
    >>>
    >>> They also screw a lot. Don't knock 'em.

    >>
    >> Knock is a synonym for screw where I was dragged up - my French teacher
    >> did her best to explain it to us.
    >>

    >
    > As in "knocked up"?


    Unfortunately, I'm not 100% sure :)
    Pete A, Feb 19, 2012
    #7
  8. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 2/19/2012 1:39 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2012-02-19 09:19:25 -0800, Alan Browne
    > <> said:
    >
    >> On 2012-02-19 11:24 , Savageduck wrote:
    >>
    >>> Just like those modern French, adding style "esses" where they aren't
    >>> needed.

    >>
    >> They also screw a lot. Don't knock 'em.

    >
    > They just want folks to believe they screw a lot. The evidence of the
    > claim has yet to be presented.
    >
    >


    I have friends who have been screwed by art dealers in Paris. Does that
    count?

    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Feb 20, 2012
    #8
  9. tony cooper

    gordo Guest

    To me, the cup part (resembles an old headlight) looks like it was formed
    from sheet stock. Perhaps on a lathe or with a press. Note the rolled edge
    which could not be cast. Also if you look inside where the vertical tubing
    is joined, you will see a seam. It was probably tubing that was welded to
    the cup. here is some distortion where the tube joins the cup suggesting
    welding. The flange was probably machined on a lathe. This would be a far
    less expensive process than casting.

    Gordo


    "PeterN" wrote in message
    news:4f411380$0$14681$-secrets.com...

    On 2/18/2012 8:58 PM, Eric Stevens wrote:
    > On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 18:29:09 -0500, Alan Browne
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2012-02-18 17:44 , Eric Stevens wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 15:27:51 -0500, Alan Browne

    >>
    >>>> Curved, reflective surfaces are always a photographic opportunity. But
    >>>> they do catch everything wildly outside the field and that gives more
    >>>> headache than opportunity in most cases.
    >>>
    >>> You mean like http://dl.dropbox.com/u/31088803/Ventilator 2.jpg ?
    >>>>

    >>
    >> Perfect. Next time look like a pro and support the lens with your left
    >> hand under the lens. ;-)
    >>
    >> (What are these? Some sort of light fixture or air intake for a boat?
    >> (I always guess wrong...)).

    >
    > Your second guess is correct. Very expensive stainless steel cast by
    > the lost wax process.
    >


    You like to keep things ship shape.

    BTW that was my guess too.
    --
    Peter
    gordo, Feb 20, 2012
    #9
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