Re: [SI] Hands & Feet is posted! Comments

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tony cooper, Apr 8, 2011.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 05 Apr 2011 19:03:54 -0400, Bowser <> wrote:

    >The latest mandate results are posted here:
    >
    >http://www.pbase.com/shootin/hands_feet
    >


    Have we stopped commenting on the SI submissions, or are the results
    of this mandate just uninteresting to the group?

    Tim Conway - Kinda strange. Yeah, it's a hand, but it's not doing
    anything interesting. And, it has a strange color cast...kinda
    greenish in places.

    Boswer [sic] 01 - These hands are doing something, but... Having
    something in the hand adds a little interest, but its a problem when
    you look at the something and wonder what it is. "What is that?" is
    not the reaction you want for a photograph.

    Boswer 02 doesn't solve the problem of the photographer not knowing
    how to spell his nom de group, but it brings in some interest by
    showing a hand from a different perspective. Until I read the
    explanation (scanner), I was impressed that "Boswer" eliminated
    reflection on the glass.

    Shiva-Das (old) - I like this kind of treatment. Not the film strip
    bit (kinda trite), but the direct and reflected scene. A good job
    here of the reflected elements well defined and the direct scene
    lending well to black and white.

    Paul Furman Fern Feet - That right foot (at the left of the image) is
    weird. Deformed toe, toe rot between the littlest piggy and the
    deformed toe, and more color cast.

    Paul Furman Mudra Hands - I had to look up "Mudra Hands". So that's
    Dhyana Mudra, perfect balance? Good idea for the mandate.

    Paul Furman Pencil Hand - Like so many in this mandate, we have a hand
    or foot but we don't have a story. What was the photographer trying
    to show?

    Peter Newman Wind Surfer - You screwed up, Peter. Could be a really
    good shot, but 300 x 200 doesn't allow it to show. It's off-mandate,
    but who cares if it's a good shot. Even at thumbnail size, the
    balance shows the result of a good crop.

    SavageDuck Banjo - Finally, a shot I can look at and think "I'd have
    shot that". Looks like a pre-war tenor Gibson. Late 20s?

    SavageDuck Ribs - I think I'd crop in for a square crop and eliminate
    most of the right side of the body and everything above the white
    area. The interest is all in the lower left of the image. No "What
    is that?" question here.

    SavageDuck Old - OK, that's my kind of photograph, but I'm a
    people-person in photography. I can't do it a lot with mandates, but
    that's what I look for. Could be cropped better (tighter left and
    right) and some cloning on that nearest finger.

    People better at judging photos than I am tell me that
    non-contributing parts of an image that are markedly different in
    color should be cropped out if possible. In this case, the window in
    the left.

    FrankEss Feet on the Pier - Would you have taken this shot if it
    wasn't for the mandate? If not, you should have kept looking.

    FrankEss Boots on the Pier - This one works. Unlike the first one,
    there some interest. The one lady with legs as thick as one of
    Annika's cheerleaders lends some humor. The composition and angle
    shows imagination.

    FrankEss Oldie - The explanatory line tells it all.

    PeterNewman Skateboarder - Proves a point, doesn't it? Tack-sharp and
    a fast shutter speed and you have a very ordinary photo. Knowing when
    to allow motion blur has its place.

    PeterNewman The Bathers - I'll ask you the same question I asked
    FrankEss.

    TonyCooper - If we could have done 4 images, I would have included
    this one shot before the mandate was announced:
    http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/Table-Top-Photography/2011-01-03-01/1153686286_HvXpp-XL.jpg







    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Apr 8, 2011
    #1
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  2. In rec.photo.digital.slr-systems tony cooper <> wrote:
    > Have we stopped commenting on the SI submissions, or are the results
    > of this mandate just uninteresting to the group?


    I threw in a late submission (shot on time but forgot to send it in); I
    was waiting to see if it went up before throwing my $1.09 out there.

    It's funny, people often accuse me of having a shoe and/or foot fetish
    givne how often I end up with pictures of random people's feet.

    - Solomon
    --
    Solomon Peachy pizza at shaftnet dot org
    Melbourne, FL ^^ (mail/jabber/gtalk) ^^
    Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur.
     
    Stuffed Crust, Apr 8, 2011
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    Bowser Guest

    "tony cooper" wrote in message
    news:...


    >Boswer [sic] 01 - These hands are doing something, but...
    >Having
    >something in the hand adds a little interest, but its a
    >problem when
    >you look at the something and wonder what it is. "What is
    >that?" is
    >not the reaction you want for a photograph.


    Huh. I thought it was kind of obvious that she was painting
    something. Oh, well.

    >Boswer 02 doesn't solve the problem of the photographer not
    >knowing
    >how to spell his nom de group, but it brings in some
    >interest by

    ..showing a hand from a different perspective. Until I read
    the
    ..explanation (scanner), I was impressed that "Boswer"
    eliminated
    >reflection on the glass.


    Od, eye've nevah had a speling isue befour. I've fixed it...
     
    Bowser, Apr 8, 2011
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Fri, 8 Apr 2011 11:11:46 -0400, "Bowser" <> wrote:

    >"tony cooper" wrote in message
    >news:...
    >
    >
    >>Boswer [sic] 01 - These hands are doing something, but...
    >>Having
    >>something in the hand adds a little interest, but its a
    >>problem when
    >>you look at the something and wonder what it is. "What is
    >>that?" is
    >>not the reaction you want for a photograph.

    >
    >Huh. I thought it was kind of obvious that she was painting
    >something. Oh, well.


    Oh, I got that. It was *what* she was painting that took over my
    interest. Maybe a dried seed pod?


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Apr 8, 2011
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    Annika1980 Guest

    Re: Hands & Feet is posted! Comments

    On Apr 8, 12:46 am, tony cooper <> wrote:
    >
    > Have we stopped commenting on the SI submissions, or are the results
    > of this mandate just uninteresting to the group?


    I think the pervs who suggested this mandate are still masturbating.
     
    Annika1980, Apr 9, 2011
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 4/8/2011 12:46 AM, tony cooper wrote:
    > On Tue, 05 Apr 2011 19:03:54 -0400, Bowser<> wrote:
    >


    >
    > Peter Newman Wind Surfer - You screwed up, Peter. Could be a really
    > good shot, but 300 x 200 doesn't allow it to show. It's off-mandate,
    > but who cares if it's a good shot. Even at thumbnail size, the
    > balance shows the result of a good crop.


    My "screw up" was the result of being paranoid. At a much larger size
    the image shows tonal gradations in the water that cannot appear in one
    of this size. Also, a larger version of that image won runner-up for
    digital image of the month at my camera club. Since I was negotiating
    possible commercial use, I presented it at a much lower resolution.


    >
    > SavageDuck Banjo - Finally, a shot I can look at and think "I'd have
    > shot that". Looks like a pre-war tenor Gibson. Late 20s?


    Nice composition and exposure. You really nailed the tense muscles in
    his forearm. I would have shot at a slightly slower speed to get some
    motion in his thumb.

    >
    > SavageDuck Ribs - I think I'd crop in for a square crop and eliminate
    > most of the right side of the body and everything above the white
    > area. The interest is all in the lower left of the image. No "What
    > is that?" question here.
    >
    > SavageDuck Old - OK, that's my kind of photograph, but I'm a
    > people-person in photography. I can't do it a lot with mandates, but
    > that's what I look for. Could be cropped better (tighter left and
    > right) and some cloning on that nearest finger.



    you caught this guy as he is remembering a life gone by. As long as we
    are picking nits, I would have removed the who left side at the door
    line and the slight highlight from the dish.

    >
    > People better at judging photos than I am tell me that
    > non-contributing parts of an image that are markedly different in
    > color should be cropped out if possible. In this case, the window in
    > the left.
    >
    > FrankEss Feet on the Pier - Would you have taken this shot if it
    > wasn't for the mandate? If not, you should have kept looking.
    >
    > FrankEss Boots on the Pier - This one works. Unlike the first one,
    > there some interest. The one lady with legs as thick as one of
    > Annika's cheerleaders lends some humor. The composition and angle
    > shows imagination.
    >
    > FrankEss Oldie - The explanatory line tells it all.
    >
    > PeterNewman Skateboarder - Proves a point, doesn't it? Tack-sharp and
    > a fast shutter speed and you have a very ordinary photo. Knowing when
    > to allow motion blur has its place.


    I saw these kids on the boards and choose one that looked like a
    beginner with more determination than the others. I used the aperture to
    get a lower speed and waited for the inevitable.

    BTW He landed safely on his feet.


    >
    > PeterNewman The Bathers - I'll ask you the same question I asked
    > FrankEss.
    >

    thanks for your feedback



    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Apr 10, 2011
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 4/9/2011 1:31 PM, Paul Furman wrote:
    > tony cooper wrote:
    >> Paul Furman Fern Feet -
    >> weird.

    >
    > Yep, feet are weird.
    > Naked feet! ack!
    >
    > :)


    It's quite a feat to do interesting feet. We have been handed a problem.


    >
    >
    >> Paul Furman Mudra Hands - I had to look up "Mudra Hands". So that's
    >> Dhyana Mudra, perfect balance? Good idea for the mandate.

    >
    > Right, Soto Zen style. There are lots of variations, I guess...
    >
    >
    >> Paul Furman Pencil Hand - Like so many in this mandate, we have a hand
    >> or foot but we don't have a story. What was the photographer trying
    >> to show?

    >
    > I think this could be used as an illustration for an article about
    > architectural work or something like that. 'Concept Phase' perhaps. It's
    > just a familiar scene for me from a past profession; landscape
    > architecture, sketching out ideas on a roll of tracing paper, kind of
    > nostalgic since most of that career was computer drafting, but I did
    > start on a board with pencils.



    OK I will make just a few comments.

    Tony Cooper egg. Fills me with curiosity just what did he do to get that
    egg. It is clear that I would not want hm to cook it for me.

    Tony Cooper rebound. The basket and ball dominate the shot. tight
    cropping of the hand and bottom of the basket would be more on point.

    Tony Cooper the Shot. Sorry I see a shot of some guy holding a ball. No
    story. it doesn't do much for me. I have seen much better examples of
    your work.

    Shiva das hands & feet. Uniquely fills the mandate. I like the
    abstraction and gradations n the black & white. (something hard to
    achieve.) The mannequins are nicely framed and cropped. Well done.



    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Apr 10, 2011
    #7
  8. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 4/10/2011 11:55 AM, Bowser wrote:
    > On 4/8/2011 11:46 AM, tony cooper wrote:
    >> On Fri, 8 Apr 2011 11:11:46 -0400, "Bowser"<> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "tony cooper" wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Boswer [sic] 01 - These hands are doing something, but...
    >>>> Having
    >>>> something in the hand adds a little interest, but its a
    >>>> problem when
    >>>> you look at the something and wonder what it is. "What is
    >>>> that?" is
    >>>> not the reaction you want for a photograph.
    >>>
    >>> Huh. I thought it was kind of obvious that she was painting
    >>> something. Oh, well.

    >>
    >> Oh, I got that. It was *what* she was painting that took over my
    >> interest. Maybe a dried seed pod?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > This was a bad week to run out of loose joints. I believe it was a
    > painted rock. Honestly, I wasn't paying attention to the rock, just the
    > hands. I guess I'll have to live in ignorance, or I'll just go back to
    > Epcot and find out.


    Not a bad choice.

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Apr 10, 2011
    #8
  9. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 11:51:09 -0400, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >OK I will make just a few comments.
    >
    >Tony Cooper egg. Fills me with curiosity just what did he do to get that
    >egg. It is clear that I would not want hm to cook it for me.


    I can satisfy that curiosity. The shot was taken in a welder's yard
    where ornamental fence and decorations were made. The holder of the
    egg was a delightful older man - one of the welders - who saw me
    taking photographs of some of the ornamental iron and motioned me
    over.

    I had not noticed that there were several chickens in the yard. The
    man's English was extremely limited (I think he was a Czech), but it
    was obvious he was proud of his chickens and would like me to
    photograph them. He leaned down and picked up that egg from a tangle
    of weeds under a section of fence. I assume the eggs were either
    taken home by him or eaten for lunch.

    As far as your feeling about not wanting him to cook it for you, I
    suggest you not look at the hands of the farmer who collects free
    range eggs. Or, the ground around a chicken coop.

    I went back a few days later and gave him a print of a photo of him
    with the chickens. He seemed very pleased.

    Last week I was again by this welding yard, but it has been closed. I
    hope the welder has found another job.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Apr 10, 2011
    #9
  10. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 4/10/2011 2:16 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    > On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 11:51:09 -0400, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> OK I will make just a few comments.
    >>
    >> Tony Cooper egg. Fills me with curiosity just what did he do to get that
    >> egg. It is clear that I would not want hm to cook it for me.

    >
    > I can satisfy that curiosity. The shot was taken in a welder's yard
    > where ornamental fence and decorations were made. The holder of the
    > egg was a delightful older man - one of the welders - who saw me
    > taking photographs of some of the ornamental iron and motioned me
    > over.
    >
    > I had not noticed that there were several chickens in the yard. The
    > man's English was extremely limited (I think he was a Czech), but it
    > was obvious he was proud of his chickens and would like me to
    > photograph them. He leaned down and picked up that egg from a tangle
    > of weeds under a section of fence. I assume the eggs were either
    > taken home by him or eaten for lunch.


    Interesting story. You probably have a lot of interesting experiences
    when you shoot people shots. That's one of the big reasons to ask for
    permission. You have an opportunity to share a piece of peoples lives.

    I join in your good wishes for the welder.

    >
    > As far as your feeling about not wanting him to cook it for you, I
    > suggest you not look at the hands of the farmer who collects free
    > range eggs. Or, the ground around a chicken coop.


    I know. But if I don't see it.........
    Hopefully, the eggs the food handler are well washed.


    >
    > I went back a few days later and gave him a print of a photo of him
    > with the chickens. He seemed very pleased.
    >
    > Last week I was again by this welding yard, but it has been closed. I
    > hope the welder has found another job.
    >
    >



    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Apr 10, 2011
    #10
  11. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 18:05:12 -0400, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >On 4/10/2011 2:16 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    >> On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 11:51:09 -0400, PeterN
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> OK I will make just a few comments.
    >>>
    >>> Tony Cooper egg. Fills me with curiosity just what did he do to get that
    >>> egg. It is clear that I would not want hm to cook it for me.

    >>
    >> I can satisfy that curiosity. The shot was taken in a welder's yard
    >> where ornamental fence and decorations were made. The holder of the
    >> egg was a delightful older man - one of the welders - who saw me
    >> taking photographs of some of the ornamental iron and motioned me
    >> over.
    >>
    >> I had not noticed that there were several chickens in the yard. The
    >> man's English was extremely limited (I think he was a Czech), but it
    >> was obvious he was proud of his chickens and would like me to
    >> photograph them. He leaned down and picked up that egg from a tangle
    >> of weeds under a section of fence. I assume the eggs were either
    >> taken home by him or eaten for lunch.

    >
    >Interesting story. You probably have a lot of interesting experiences
    >when you shoot people shots. That's one of the big reasons to ask for
    >permission. You have an opportunity to share a piece of peoples lives.
    >


    I frequently return to the scene and provide prints of photographs
    I've taken. The reaction is amazing. You'd think the people had
    never had a snapshot of themselves before.

    Other times - as with the photographs of the basketball players in
    "Hands" - the subjects have come up and asked me to email them the
    photographs.

    Bikers are the biggest hams. I like candid shots where I catch the
    subject unaware. Bikers, though, if they see the camera, start
    mugging for the shot. I see some guy that looks like a Warlock (bad
    bike gang) and someone I wouldn't want to meet in a dark alley, and he
    starts posing for the camera.

    I rarely ask for permission. Sometimes I'm given tacit permission
    because the person sees the camera and doesn't show signs of
    objecting. When going for candid, permission defeats the goal.

    I've asked for permission a few times when children have been in the
    shot (but not the subject of the shot). In these cases, I'll offer to
    show the parents the image on the viewer. I rarely shoot images with
    children in them unless the children are related to me.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Apr 10, 2011
    #11
  12. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 4/10/2011 6:48 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    > On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 18:05:12 -0400, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 4/10/2011 2:16 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 11:51:09 -0400, PeterN
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> OK I will make just a few comments.
    >>>>
    >>>> Tony Cooper egg. Fills me with curiosity just what did he do to get that
    >>>> egg. It is clear that I would not want hm to cook it for me.
    >>>
    >>> I can satisfy that curiosity. The shot was taken in a welder's yard
    >>> where ornamental fence and decorations were made. The holder of the
    >>> egg was a delightful older man - one of the welders - who saw me
    >>> taking photographs of some of the ornamental iron and motioned me
    >>> over.
    >>>
    >>> I had not noticed that there were several chickens in the yard. The
    >>> man's English was extremely limited (I think he was a Czech), but it
    >>> was obvious he was proud of his chickens and would like me to
    >>> photograph them. He leaned down and picked up that egg from a tangle
    >>> of weeds under a section of fence. I assume the eggs were either
    >>> taken home by him or eaten for lunch.

    >>
    >> Interesting story. You probably have a lot of interesting experiences
    >> when you shoot people shots. That's one of the big reasons to ask for
    >> permission. You have an opportunity to share a piece of peoples lives.
    >>

    >
    > I frequently return to the scene and provide prints of photographs
    > I've taken. The reaction is amazing. You'd think the people had
    > never had a snapshot of themselves before.
    >
    > Other times - as with the photographs of the basketball players in
    > "Hands" - the subjects have come up and asked me to email them the
    > photographs.
    >
    > Bikers are the biggest hams. I like candid shots where I catch the
    > subject unaware. Bikers, though, if they see the camera, start
    > mugging for the shot. I see some guy that looks like a Warlock (bad
    > bike gang) and someone I wouldn't want to meet in a dark alley, and he
    > starts posing for the camera.


    Here the majority of bikers are lawyers and stockbrokers. Come to think
    of it, I would be careful meeting them in a well lit office.


    >
    > I rarely ask for permission. Sometimes I'm given tacit permission
    > because the person sees the camera and doesn't show signs of
    > objecting. When going for candid, permission defeats the goal.
    >
    > I've asked for permission a few times when children have been in the
    > shot (but not the subject of the shot). In these cases, I'll offer to
    > show the parents the image on the viewer. I rarely shoot images with
    > children in them unless the children are related to me.
    >


    My SI submission of bathers, was of teens who were present with a
    parent. I asked for and received permission.

    In Oops! I had tacit permission. The skateboarders all saw me taking
    pictures. They did Ham it up for a while, but they soon turned their
    attention back to skateboarding.
    I feel I am doing this for my pleasure. I simply don't feel right if I
    am making someone uncomfortable for my pleasure.


    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Apr 11, 2011
    #12
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