Re: [SI] Don't forget to send in your wallpaper!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Peter, Jun 12, 2010.

  1. Peter

    Peter Guest

    "Bowser" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > About a week to go for the latest mandate, Wallpaper. Be sure to send
    > in your best shot, and remember, all shots must be 1920 pixels x 1200
    > pixels in size.
    >
    > http://www.pbase.com/shootin/wallpaper
    >
    > More info about the Shoot-In here:
    >
    > http://www.pbase.com/shootin/rulzpage



    Didn't I read somewhere that an archival image was OK for this one image?

    --
    Peter
     
    Peter, Jun 12, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Peter

    Peter Guest

    "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    news:2010061211563677923-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    > On 2010-06-12 10:35:20 -0700, "Peter" <> said:
    >
    >> "Bowser" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> About a week to go for the latest mandate, Wallpaper. Be sure to send
    >>> in your best shot, and remember, all shots must be 1920 pixels x 1200
    >>> pixels in size.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/wallpaper
    >>>
    >>> More info about the Shoot-In here:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/rulzpage

    >>
    >>
    >> Didn't I read somewhere that an archival image was OK for this one image?

    >
    > Check with Bowser. He and Bret have already gone around in circles over
    > entry dates on this one.
    > I believe he lifted the 300 kb limit for one entry @ 1920x1200.
    >
    > I think the archive entry was for the "Facescape" SI.
    >



    Thanks,

    I have two candidates within the mandate period, but one archival I like a
    lot better. Guess I will wait for Bowser.

    --
    Peter
     
    Peter, Jun 12, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Peter

    Peter Guest

    "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    news:2010061214203037709-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    > On 2010-06-12 10:35:20 -0700, "Peter" <> said:
    >
    >> "Bowser" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> About a week to go for the latest mandate, Wallpaper. Be sure to send
    >>> in your best shot, and remember, all shots must be 1920 pixels x 1200
    >>> pixels in size.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/wallpaper
    >>>
    >>> More info about the Shoot-In here:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/rulzpage

    >>
    >>
    >> Didn't I read somewhere that an archival image was OK for this one image?

    >
    > Here was what Bowser posted back in April with his SI Wallpaper
    > declaration;
    >
    > "Next, the new mandate announcement: The Wallpaper Project. Here's what
    > this means: I use a few of my shots as wallpaper on my PC; we all
    > probably do. This mandate will challenge the shooter to produce the
    > best wallpaper in wide screen format so other users can download and
    > use the shot as wallpaper on their PC. All submissions must be 1920 x
    > 1200 pixels to fill a wide monitor. Shooters are limited to ONE
    > submission for this mandate only, so make your wallpaper a good one,
    > and make sure it looks good at large sizes (like a 24" monitor). You
    > may include your "signature" on the photo, as well. Lastly, the 300K
    > file size limit is waived for this mandate."
    >



    Thanks, I remember that.
    Now it's starting to bother me. I simply don't know where I got my idea
    from, .

    --
    Peter
     
    Peter, Jun 13, 2010
    #3
  4. Peter

    Peter Guest

    "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    news:2010061217435338165-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    > On 2010-06-12 17:21:45 -0700, "Peter" <> said:
    >
    >> "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    >> news:2010061214203037709-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    >>> On 2010-06-12 10:35:20 -0700, "Peter" <>
    >>> said:
    >>>
    >>>> "Bowser" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> About a week to go for the latest mandate, Wallpaper. Be sure to send
    >>>>> in your best shot, and remember, all shots must be 1920 pixels x 1200
    >>>>> pixels in size.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/wallpaper
    >>>>>
    >>>>> More info about the Shoot-In here:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/rulzpage
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Didn't I read somewhere that an archival image was OK for this one
    >>>> image?
    >>>
    >>> Here was what Bowser posted back in April with his SI Wallpaper
    >>> declaration;
    >>>
    >>> "Next, the new mandate announcement: The Wallpaper Project. Here's what
    >>> this means: I use a few of my shots as wallpaper on my PC; we all
    >>> probably do. This mandate will challenge the shooter to produce the
    >>> best wallpaper in wide screen format so other users can download and
    >>> use the shot as wallpaper on their PC. All submissions must be 1920 x
    >>> 1200 pixels to fill a wide monitor. Shooters are limited to ONE
    >>> submission for this mandate only, so make your wallpaper a good one,
    >>> and make sure it looks good at large sizes (like a 24" monitor). You
    >>> may include your "signature" on the photo, as well. Lastly, the 300K
    >>> file size limit is waived for this mandate."
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks, I remember that.
    >> Now it's starting to bother me. I simply don't know where I got my idea
    >> from, .

    >
    > It's OK. You are not going crazy. Here is what he posted on April 28;
    >
    > "Just a reminder that we have two active mandates, Facescapes and The
    > Wallpaper Project, open for submissions. Facescapes is due May 16th,
    > 2010 and Wallpaper is due June 20th, 2010. Links are here:
    >
    > http://www.pbase.com/shootin/facescape
    >
    > http://www.pbase.com/shootin/wallpaper
    >
    > Amplifying info:
    >
    > Facescape: shoot a close up of a human face and show it in
    > excrutiating detail. Don't worry about archive shots on this one...
    >
    > Wallpaper: shoot something, whatever you want, and make it suitable
    > for PC wallpaper. the image must be 1920 x 1200 pixels so it can
    > properly fill a good size wide screen monitor. And for this mandate
    > you're limited to one submission, but the usual 300K file size
    > limitation is waived. And don't be like some lazy Nikon wannabes from
    > TN, shoot something new; don't submit archive shots."
    >
    > So your memory is not failing you.
    > ...yet.
    >


    OK. Yes, I just got confused between the two. I am down to three candidates.
    I must get it done within the next few days as we have a planned trip to
    shoot puffins, next weekend.

    --
    Peter
     
    Peter, Jun 13, 2010
    #4
  5. Peter

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:07:16 -0400, "Peter"
    <> wrote:

    >OK. Yes, I just got confused between the two. I am down to three candidates.
    >I must get it done within the next few days as we have a planned trip to
    >shoot puffins, next weekend.


    Is a hunting permit required? Is there a bag limit? Any recipes?

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jun 13, 2010
    #5
  6. Peter

    Dudley Hanks Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:07:16 -0400, "Peter"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>OK. Yes, I just got confused between the two. I am down to three
    >>candidates.
    >>I must get it done within the next few days as we have a planned trip to
    >>shoot puffins, next weekend.

    >
    > Is a hunting permit required? Is there a bag limit? Any recipes?
    >

    Do they go "poof" when they're shot?

    Take Care,
    Dudley
     
    Dudley Hanks, Jun 13, 2010
    #6
  7. Peter

    Henry Olson Guest

    Thought for Food

    On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:49:16 -0400, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:07:16 -0400, "Peter"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>OK. Yes, I just got confused between the two. I am down to three candidates.
    >>I must get it done within the next few days as we have a planned trip to
    >>shoot puffins, next weekend.

    >
    >Is a hunting permit required? Is there a bag limit? Any recipes?


    When living in remote areas of the Everglades for many months I often
    wondered why there's no recipes for Vultures. Some of them would browse not
    more than a few feet from where I would sit at my campsite. It would be
    easy to just reach out and grab their necks. Locals claimed the reason was
    that vultures only eat carrion and this would make them unfit for human
    consumption. Yet I have photographic proof that they eat live fish most of
    the morning. Catching them just like any crane or other wading bird.
    There's lots of animals that we use for food that only eat dead things. In
    fact humans themselves are mostly carrion eaters (aside from the few that
    relish sashimi, sushi, and tartare recipes). Why are Vultures off the
    table? When back in civilization I searched the net for Vulture recipes,
    but the only thing I found was joke recipes. Has nobody ever tried them?
    Where they are plentiful I'd think they'd be a better source of holiday
    dinners than turkeys. They're about the same size with huge flight-muscles.
     
    Henry Olson, Jun 13, 2010
    #7
  8. Peter

    Henry Olson Guest

    Thought for Food

    On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:49:16 -0400, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:07:16 -0400, "Peter"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>OK. Yes, I just got confused between the two. I am down to three candidates.
    >>I must get it done within the next few days as we have a planned trip to
    >>shoot puffins, next weekend.

    >
    >Is a hunting permit required? Is there a bag limit? Any recipes?


    When living in remote areas of the Everglades for many months I often
    wondered why there's no recipes for Vultures. Some of them would browse not
    more than a few feet from where I would sit at my campsite. It would be
    easy to just reach out and grab their necks. Locals claimed the reason was
    that vultures only eat carrion and this would make them unfit for human
    consumption. Yet I have photographic proof that they eat live fish most of
    the morning. Catching them just like any crane or other wading bird.
    There's lots of animals that we use for food that only eat dead things. In
    fact humans themselves are mostly carrion eaters (aside from the few that
    relish sashimi, sushi, and tartare recipes). Why are Vultures off the
    table? When back in civilization I searched the net for Vulture recipes,
    but the only thing I found was joke recipes. Has nobody ever tried them?
    Where they are plentiful I'd think they'd be a better source of holiday
    dinners than turkeys. They're about the same size with huge flight-muscles.


    p.s. For the record, when I asked locals what unusual odd green colored
    wading birds were (Green Herons in breeding plumage, which I never saw that
    brightly colored before) they told me they called them "Steak Birds",
    because they taste just like steak.
     
    Henry Olson, Jun 13, 2010
    #8
  9. Peter

    Tim Conway Guest

    Re: Thought for Food

    "Henry Olson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:49:16 -0400, tony cooper
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:07:16 -0400, "Peter"
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>>OK. Yes, I just got confused between the two. I am down to three
    >>>candidates.
    >>>I must get it done within the next few days as we have a planned trip to
    >>>shoot puffins, next weekend.

    >>
    >>Is a hunting permit required? Is there a bag limit? Any recipes?

    >
    > When living in remote areas of the Everglades for many months I often
    > wondered why there's no recipes for Vultures. Some of them would browse
    > not
    > more than a few feet from where I would sit at my campsite. It would be
    > easy to just reach out and grab their necks. Locals claimed the reason was
    > that vultures only eat carrion and this would make them unfit for human
    > consumption. Yet I have photographic proof that they eat live fish most of
    > the morning. Catching them just like any crane or other wading bird.
    > There's lots of animals that we use for food that only eat dead things. In
    > fact humans themselves are mostly carrion eaters (aside from the few that
    > relish sashimi, sushi, and tartare recipes). Why are Vultures off the
    > table? When back in civilization I searched the net for Vulture recipes,
    > but the only thing I found was joke recipes. Has nobody ever tried them?
    > Where they are plentiful I'd think they'd be a better source of holiday
    > dinners than turkeys. They're about the same size with huge
    > flight-muscles.
    >
    >
    > p.s. For the record, when I asked locals what unusual odd green colored
    > wading birds were (Green Herons in breeding plumage, which I never saw
    > that
    > brightly colored before) they told me they called them "Steak Birds",
    > because they taste just like steak.


    Interesting about the Green Herons. I never really considered eating them.
    hmmm
    My guess about the vultures is that someone tried them sometime and they
    tasted so bad that it was quickly forgotten and hushed up. LOL. The idea
    itself is kinda repulsive - except for the ones like you said that eat the
    live fish. You'd think they would taste fishy, like some ducks that eat
    mostly fish.
     
    Tim Conway, Jun 13, 2010
    #9
  10. Peter

    Tim Conway Guest

    Re: Thought for Food

    "Allen" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Tim Conway wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Interesting about the Green Herons. I never really considered eating
    >> them. hmmm
    >> My guess about the vultures is that someone tried them sometime and they
    >> tasted so bad that it was quickly forgotten and hushed up. LOL. The idea
    >> itself is kinda repulsive - except for the ones like you said that eat
    >> the live fish. You'd think they would taste fishy, like some ducks that
    >> eat mostly fish.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > In my part of the world they would probably taste like armadillos. For
    > appetizers, some could be selected that taste like squirrel. Bur who wants
    > anything that tastes like squirrel or (especially) armadillo?


    In PA some people eat squirrel pot pie. Not me. I never tasted it but
    they're like rats to me, not appetizing at all.
     
    Tim Conway, Jun 13, 2010
    #10
  11. Peter

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 18:54:27 -0700, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    : On 2010-06-12 18:49:16 -0700, tony cooper <> said:
    :
    : > On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:07:16 -0400, "Peter"
    : > <> wrote:
    : >
    : >> OK. Yes, I just got confused between the two. I am down to three candidates.
    : >> I must get it done within the next few days as we have a planned trip to
    : >> shoot puffins, next weekend.
    : >
    : > Is a hunting permit required? Is there a bag limit? Any recipes?
    :
    : Aah!
    : Puffin tartare.

    Poached puffin with peas and pears.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 13, 2010
    #11
  12. Peter

    J. Clarke Guest

    Re: Thought for Food

    On 6/13/2010 5:23 AM, Tim Conway wrote:
    >
    > "Allen" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Tim Conway wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Interesting about the Green Herons. I never really considered eating
    >>> them. hmmm
    >>> My guess about the vultures is that someone tried them sometime and
    >>> they tasted so bad that it was quickly forgotten and hushed up. LOL.
    >>> The idea itself is kinda repulsive - except for the ones like you
    >>> said that eat the live fish. You'd think they would taste fishy, like
    >>> some ducks that eat mostly fish.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> In my part of the world they would probably taste like armadillos. For
    >> appetizers, some could be selected that taste like squirrel. Bur who
    >> wants anything that tastes like squirrel or (especially) armadillo?

    >
    > In PA some people eat squirrel pot pie. Not me. I never tasted it but
    > they're like rats to me, not appetizing at all.


    I loaned out my copy, but in "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog" the authors
    include a tested recipe for "bakers", as culinary rats were referred to
    in Nelson's Navy. They say that they were quite surprised at how well
    it turned out.
     
    J. Clarke, Jun 13, 2010
    #12
  13. Peter

    Henry Olson Guest

    Re: Thought for Food

    On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 05:23:35 -0400, "Tim Conway" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Allen" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Tim Conway wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Interesting about the Green Herons. I never really considered eating
    >>> them. hmmm
    >>> My guess about the vultures is that someone tried them sometime and they
    >>> tasted so bad that it was quickly forgotten and hushed up. LOL. The idea
    >>> itself is kinda repulsive - except for the ones like you said that eat
    >>> the live fish. You'd think they would taste fishy, like some ducks that
    >>> eat mostly fish.


    What you state is based on speculation and unfounded stories. Until someone
    actually tries vulture, has others compare the flavor in a blind
    taste-test, you're just passing on more stories. What I don't get is how
    people can look at a turkey and perceive it as wonderful food; yet see a
    turkey-vulture appearing just as odd as a turkey, actually less odd
    looking, and be disgusted by it.

    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> In my part of the world they would probably taste like armadillos. For
    >> appetizers, some could be selected that taste like squirrel. Bur who wants
    >> anything that tastes like squirrel or (especially) armadillo?

    >
    >In PA some people eat squirrel pot pie. Not me. I never tasted it but
    >they're like rats to me, not appetizing at all.


    It's just social conditioning that makes you choose some foods and reject
    others.

    Roasted squirrel on a barbeque is actually quite good. People also relish
    frog's-legs in fine dining establishments. I too have eaten frog's-legs on
    quite a few occasions, they make for an excellent meal. Alligator is also
    delicious when cooked properly. I liken it to the best scallops I've ever
    had, without that sickly-sweet flavor that scallops can sometimes have.
    Alligators eat carrion as well for a large part of their diet.

    Now take Ling Cod for a good example of how social conditioning changes
    people's perceptions. Considered one of the best food-fishes in most every
    area where it is found. But in portions of the north-central USA it is
    called the "Eel-pout" and is considered a trash fish. They even have winter
    fishing contests to see who can catch the biggest one so they can destroy
    them all. Anyone in that region who eats it is considered fool-hardy and
    ridiculous.

    The only conclusion that can be reached by this is that the majority of
    people living in that area of the world are rather dim-witted, foolish, and
    wasteful.
     
    Henry Olson, Jun 13, 2010
    #13
  14. Peter

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 02:26:37 GMT, "Dudley Hanks" <>
    wrote:
    :
    : "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    : news:...
    : > On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:07:16 -0400, "Peter"
    : > <> wrote:
    : >
    : >>OK. Yes, I just got confused between the two. I am down to three
    : >>candidates.
    : >>I must get it done within the next few days as we have a planned trip to
    : >>shoot puffins, next weekend.
    : >
    : > Is a hunting permit required? Is there a bag limit? Any recipes?
    : >
    : Do they go "poof" when they're shot?
    :
    : Take Care,
    : Dudley

    It's more of a "pop". Like a balloon.

    Of course you won't hear it unless you use a bow and arrow.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 13, 2010
    #14
  15. Peter

    Tim Conway Guest

    Re: Thought for Food

    "Henry Olson" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 05:23:35 -0400, "Tim Conway" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Allen" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> Tim Conway wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Interesting about the Green Herons. I never really considered eating
    >>>> them. hmmm
    >>>> My guess about the vultures is that someone tried them sometime and
    >>>> they
    >>>> tasted so bad that it was quickly forgotten and hushed up. LOL. The
    >>>> idea
    >>>> itself is kinda repulsive - except for the ones like you said that eat
    >>>> the live fish. You'd think they would taste fishy, like some ducks
    >>>> that
    >>>> eat mostly fish.

    >
    > What you state is based on speculation and unfounded stories. Until
    > someone
    > actually tries vulture, has others compare the flavor in a blind
    > taste-test, you're just passing on more stories. What I don't get is how
    > people can look at a turkey and perceive it as wonderful food; yet see a
    > turkey-vulture appearing just as odd as a turkey, actually less odd
    > looking, and be disgusted by it.
    >
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> In my part of the world they would probably taste like armadillos. For
    >>> appetizers, some could be selected that taste like squirrel. Bur who
    >>> wants
    >>> anything that tastes like squirrel or (especially) armadillo?

    >>
    >>In PA some people eat squirrel pot pie. Not me. I never tasted it but
    >>they're like rats to me, not appetizing at all.

    >
    > It's just social conditioning that makes you choose some foods and reject
    > others.
    >
    > Roasted squirrel on a barbeque is actually quite good. People also relish
    > frog's-legs in fine dining establishments. I too have eaten frog's-legs on
    > quite a few occasions, they make for an excellent meal. Alligator is also
    > delicious when cooked properly. I liken it to the best scallops I've ever
    > had, without that sickly-sweet flavor that scallops can sometimes have.
    > Alligators eat carrion as well for a large part of their diet.
    >
    > Now take Ling Cod for a good example of how social conditioning changes
    > people's perceptions. Considered one of the best food-fishes in most every
    > area where it is found. But in portions of the north-central USA it is
    > called the "Eel-pout" and is considered a trash fish. They even have
    > winter
    > fishing contests to see who can catch the biggest one so they can destroy
    > them all. Anyone in that region who eats it is considered fool-hardy and
    > ridiculous.
    >
    > The only conclusion that can be reached by this is that the majority of
    > people living in that area of the world are rather dim-witted, foolish,
    > and
    > wasteful.
    >

    I agree that we are conditioned by our culture as to what we like or find
    distasteful. Take gorgonzola cheese for example, I like it but I've heard
    the Chinese find it offensive - even cheese in general. Why one person will
    eat oysters, shrimp, clams, etc. but avoid eel in sushi is another example.
    I've eaten alligator in a stew at Flo's Place in Murrell's Inlet, SC. It
    was really good. (I wish I could get back there again sometime...)
     
    Tim Conway, Jun 13, 2010
    #15
  16. Peter

    Robert Coe Guest

    Re: Thought for Food

    On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 23:10:12 -0500, Henry Olson <> wrote:
    : On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:49:16 -0400, tony cooper
    : <> wrote:
    :
    : >On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:07:16 -0400, "Peter"
    : ><> wrote:
    : >
    : >>OK. Yes, I just got confused between the two. I am down to three candidates.
    : >>I must get it done within the next few days as we have a planned trip to
    : >>shoot puffins, next weekend.
    : >
    : >Is a hunting permit required? Is there a bag limit? Any recipes?
    :
    : When living in remote areas of the Everglades for many months I often
    : wondered why there's no recipes for Vultures. Some of them would browse not
    : more than a few feet from where I would sit at my campsite. It would be
    : easy to just reach out and grab their necks. Locals claimed the reason was
    : that vultures only eat carrion and this would make them unfit for human
    : consumption. Yet I have photographic proof that they eat live fish most of
    : the morning. Catching them just like any crane or other wading bird.
    : There's lots of animals that we use for food that only eat dead things. In
    : fact humans themselves are mostly carrion eaters (aside from the few that
    : relish sashimi, sushi, and tartare recipes). Why are Vultures off the
    : table? When back in civilization I searched the net for Vulture recipes,
    : but the only thing I found was joke recipes. Has nobody ever tried them?
    : Where they are plentiful I'd think they'd be a better source of holiday
    : dinners than turkeys. They're about the same size with huge flight-muscles.

    Possibly the huge flight muscles are the key. My guess is that vultures aren't
    hunted for food because they're tough as rawhide and taste like what they eat.
    BYW, I don't think you'd want to reach out and grab them unless you were
    wearing heavy leather gloves.

    Here in Massachusetts we've been inundated by an exploding population of
    Canada geese, ever since the Government banned DDT. They're everywhere, and
    they multiply so fast that we can't breed enough Labrador retrievers to chase
    them away. Their crap makes athletic fields unusable, and so many of them have
    grown too fat to migrate that some biologists now consider them a distinct
    sub-species. So people began to ask, "Why don't we organize goose shoots?
    There must be enough wild geese to provide Christmas dinner for every person
    in the state." The answer from the state biologists was that they're loaded
    with fat and don't taste very good, so most people wouldn't want to eat them.

    : p.s. For the record, when I asked locals what unusual odd green colored
    : wading birds were (Green Herons in breeding plumage, which I never saw that
    : brightly colored before) they told me they called them "Steak Birds",
    : because they taste just like steak.

    So you're "Ben Dover". I'm a bit surprised you were willing to expose that
    fact. Did you think we wouldn't notice?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 13, 2010
    #16
  17. Peter

    tony cooper Guest

    Re: Thought for Food

    On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 11:11:26 -0400, "Tim Conway"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Henry Olson" <> wrote in message
    >news:p...
    >> On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 05:23:35 -0400, "Tim Conway" <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"Allen" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>> Tim Conway wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Interesting about the Green Herons. I never really considered eating
    >>>>> them. hmmm
    >>>>> My guess about the vultures is that someone tried them sometime and
    >>>>> they
    >>>>> tasted so bad that it was quickly forgotten and hushed up. LOL. The
    >>>>> idea
    >>>>> itself is kinda repulsive - except for the ones like you said that eat
    >>>>> the live fish. You'd think they would taste fishy, like some ducks
    >>>>> that
    >>>>> eat mostly fish.

    >>
    >> What you state is based on speculation and unfounded stories. Until
    >> someone
    >> actually tries vulture, has others compare the flavor in a blind
    >> taste-test, you're just passing on more stories. What I don't get is how
    >> people can look at a turkey and perceive it as wonderful food; yet see a
    >> turkey-vulture appearing just as odd as a turkey, actually less odd
    >> looking, and be disgusted by it.
    >>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> In my part of the world they would probably taste like armadillos. For
    >>>> appetizers, some could be selected that taste like squirrel. Bur who
    >>>> wants
    >>>> anything that tastes like squirrel or (especially) armadillo?
    >>>
    >>>In PA some people eat squirrel pot pie. Not me. I never tasted it but
    >>>they're like rats to me, not appetizing at all.

    >>
    >> It's just social conditioning that makes you choose some foods and reject
    >> others.
    >>
    >> Roasted squirrel on a barbeque is actually quite good. People also relish
    >> frog's-legs in fine dining establishments. I too have eaten frog's-legs on
    >> quite a few occasions, they make for an excellent meal. Alligator is also
    >> delicious when cooked properly. I liken it to the best scallops I've ever
    >> had, without that sickly-sweet flavor that scallops can sometimes have.
    >> Alligators eat carrion as well for a large part of their diet.
    >>
    >> Now take Ling Cod for a good example of how social conditioning changes
    >> people's perceptions. Considered one of the best food-fishes in most every
    >> area where it is found. But in portions of the north-central USA it is
    >> called the "Eel-pout" and is considered a trash fish. They even have
    >> winter
    >> fishing contests to see who can catch the biggest one so they can destroy
    >> them all. Anyone in that region who eats it is considered fool-hardy and
    >> ridiculous.
    >>
    >> The only conclusion that can be reached by this is that the majority of
    >> people living in that area of the world are rather dim-witted, foolish,
    >> and
    >> wasteful.
    >>

    >I agree that we are conditioned by our culture as to what we like or find
    >distasteful. Take gorgonzola cheese for example, I like it but I've heard
    >the Chinese find it offensive - even cheese in general. Why one person will
    >eat oysters, shrimp, clams, etc. but avoid eel in sushi is another example.
    >I've eaten alligator in a stew at Flo's Place in Murrell's Inlet, SC. It
    >was really good. (I wish I could get back there again sometime...)
    >
    >

    Gator, which is on the menu in many places around here, is not
    particularly tasty. What makes it tasty is the way that it is
    prepared. What you liked were the breading, the spices, or something
    else about the way it was prepared.

    Unlike beef, you can't just slap a cut of gator on the bbq and expect
    it to be good without some seasoning.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jun 13, 2010
    #17
  18. Peter

    Tim Conway Guest

    Re: Thought for Food

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 11:11:26 -0400, "Tim Conway"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Henry Olson" <> wrote in message
    >>news:p...
    >>> On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 05:23:35 -0400, "Tim Conway"
    >>> <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>"Allen" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:...
    >>>>> Tim Conway wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Interesting about the Green Herons. I never really considered eating
    >>>>>> them. hmmm
    >>>>>> My guess about the vultures is that someone tried them sometime and
    >>>>>> they
    >>>>>> tasted so bad that it was quickly forgotten and hushed up. LOL. The
    >>>>>> idea
    >>>>>> itself is kinda repulsive - except for the ones like you said that
    >>>>>> eat
    >>>>>> the live fish. You'd think they would taste fishy, like some ducks
    >>>>>> that
    >>>>>> eat mostly fish.
    >>>
    >>> What you state is based on speculation and unfounded stories. Until
    >>> someone
    >>> actually tries vulture, has others compare the flavor in a blind
    >>> taste-test, you're just passing on more stories. What I don't get is how
    >>> people can look at a turkey and perceive it as wonderful food; yet see a
    >>> turkey-vulture appearing just as odd as a turkey, actually less odd
    >>> looking, and be disgusted by it.
    >>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> In my part of the world they would probably taste like armadillos. For
    >>>>> appetizers, some could be selected that taste like squirrel. Bur who
    >>>>> wants
    >>>>> anything that tastes like squirrel or (especially) armadillo?
    >>>>
    >>>>In PA some people eat squirrel pot pie. Not me. I never tasted it but
    >>>>they're like rats to me, not appetizing at all.
    >>>
    >>> It's just social conditioning that makes you choose some foods and
    >>> reject
    >>> others.
    >>>
    >>> Roasted squirrel on a barbeque is actually quite good. People also
    >>> relish
    >>> frog's-legs in fine dining establishments. I too have eaten frog's-legs
    >>> on
    >>> quite a few occasions, they make for an excellent meal. Alligator is
    >>> also
    >>> delicious when cooked properly. I liken it to the best scallops I've
    >>> ever
    >>> had, without that sickly-sweet flavor that scallops can sometimes have.
    >>> Alligators eat carrion as well for a large part of their diet.
    >>>
    >>> Now take Ling Cod for a good example of how social conditioning changes
    >>> people's perceptions. Considered one of the best food-fishes in most
    >>> every
    >>> area where it is found. But in portions of the north-central USA it is
    >>> called the "Eel-pout" and is considered a trash fish. They even have
    >>> winter
    >>> fishing contests to see who can catch the biggest one so they can
    >>> destroy
    >>> them all. Anyone in that region who eats it is considered fool-hardy and
    >>> ridiculous.
    >>>
    >>> The only conclusion that can be reached by this is that the majority of
    >>> people living in that area of the world are rather dim-witted, foolish,
    >>> and
    >>> wasteful.
    >>>

    >>I agree that we are conditioned by our culture as to what we like or find
    >>distasteful. Take gorgonzola cheese for example, I like it but I've heard
    >>the Chinese find it offensive - even cheese in general. Why one person
    >>will
    >>eat oysters, shrimp, clams, etc. but avoid eel in sushi is another
    >>example.
    >>I've eaten alligator in a stew at Flo's Place in Murrell's Inlet, SC. It
    >>was really good. (I wish I could get back there again sometime...)
    >>
    >>

    > Gator, which is on the menu in many places around here, is not
    > particularly tasty. What makes it tasty is the way that it is
    > prepared. What you liked were the breading, the spices, or something
    > else about the way it was prepared.
    >
    > Unlike beef, you can't just slap a cut of gator on the bbq and expect
    > it to be good without some seasoning.
    >

    That's true. It was a highly seasoned dish with smoked sausage in it too.
    They had gator ribs there too, but it mostly was a novelty, for tourists, as
    there was very little meat on them. They had a delicious sauce on them
    though. It *is* a very mild flavored meat.
     
    Tim Conway, Jun 13, 2010
    #18
  19. Peter

    Tim Conway Guest

    "Robert Coe" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 02:26:37 GMT, "Dudley Hanks"
    > <>
    > wrote:
    > :
    > : "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    > : news:...
    > : > On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 21:07:16 -0400, "Peter"
    > : > <> wrote:
    > : >
    > : >>OK. Yes, I just got confused between the two. I am down to three
    > : >>candidates.
    > : >>I must get it done within the next few days as we have a planned trip
    > to
    > : >>shoot puffins, next weekend.
    > : >
    > : > Is a hunting permit required? Is there a bag limit? Any recipes?
    > : >
    > : Do they go "poof" when they're shot?
    > :
    > : Take Care,
    > : Dudley
    >
    > It's more of a "pop". Like a balloon.
    >
    > Of course you won't hear it unless you use a bow and arrow.


    Seriously, though, I think Peter had a camera in mind.
     
    Tim Conway, Jun 13, 2010
    #19
  20. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Re: Thought for Food

    "Henry Olson" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Locals claimed the reason was
    > that vultures only eat carrion


    I think bringing a vulture on an airline, would save money. At $50 per bag,
    I wonder how many they could eat.
    OTOH Maybe the airlines are run by vultures.

    --
    Peter
     
    Peter, Jun 13, 2010
    #20
    1. Advertising

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